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  • @llli*alysandrasmom's Avatar
    Today, 01:02 PM
    I just posted this on my other thread Now, with it possibly being a medical condition, should I do as the doctor has asked? Not nurse and give him just the formula? I believe this is a trial to see if my baby is able to gain weight and if not, then they are going to look and see what else it could be. Maybe its not my milk but something else that is wrong with him physically?
    14 replies | 334 view(s)
  • @llli*alysandrasmom's Avatar
    Today, 01:01 PM
    Now, with it possibly being a medical condition, should I do as the doctor has asked? Not nurse and give him just the formula? I believe this is a trial to see if my baby is able to gain weight and if not, then they are going to look and see what else it could be. Maybe its not my milk but something else that is wrong with him physically?
    4 replies | 164 view(s)
  • @llli*alysandrasmom's Avatar
    Today, 12:54 PM
    My supply dropped when I started back at work. I pump at work 3 times a day for about 15 minutes. That is when the issue started. Baby had his check up at 2 months the end of December and weighed 10 pounds. I had just started back at work then. From his 1 month check up to his 2nd month, he gained a whole pound. Baby is eating 7-8 times a day and he gets no more than 4-5 oz in one feeding and it holds him over 3-4 hours usually. He usually has 3 bottles when Im at work. I usually only get 1.5-2 oz at one pumping session. My family is concerned as I have been nursing him a few times on top of giving him the formula (my mother mainly). This alone is causing stress because they are saying that my milk could pretty much be doing more damage than good? Even brought up the possible issue of Failure to Thrive, which only symptom of that is the lack of weight gain. This is just super frustrating and I keep getting mixed emotions about this whole situation!
    14 replies | 334 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 12:38 PM
    This sounds not only normal but as if your child eats quite a bit. Not in my opinion. I am sure you do not mean it this way, but in practice wouldn't that be a bit like punishing your child for not eating? That is never a good idea. Breastmilk is the healthiest and most nutritionally complete single food a child can eat. There is nothing wrong with your child choosing it over other foods, even if that is what is happening. If your child prefers your milk while also starting to eat a variety of solids, as it sounds like what is happening, I suggest there is absolutely nothing wrong with that. Again I suggest the book My Child Won't Eat. Trust me you will find it eye opening. As parents we live in a world obsessed with how much, how often, and what children eat and this leads to a desire to both minutely control and increase intake, and this is usually totally unnecessary. This obsession has coincided with a society-wide steady slide into more eating disorders and obesity, not less. Assuming it is offered to them, healthy children know what they need and will eat as much and what they need.
    7 replies | 151 view(s)
  • @llli*chivislh's Avatar
    Today, 12:35 PM
    :hello no lo se, nunca logre la LME, lo q a mi me ayudo fue ponerme a mi bebe mas seguido, es decir, cada hora, otra opción sería que si no quiere mamar cada hora, pues te saques la leche cuando no quiera, y inmediatamente después de que tome también sácala. Date masajes antes de que le des leche, hay unos videos en el foro del idioma inglés, no se si también este en el de español que te dicen como masajear. Por cierto, 3 onzas de leche cada tres horas es mucha leche, yo cuando me la sacaba solo salían 2 cada 3 horas pero vi que si me la sacaba cada hora sacaba 1.5 cada hora x 3 horas en total eran 4.5, si tu te la sacas cada hora, entonces seria algo así: 2X3=6 mucha leche o + ..., quizás solo necesitas ponerla mas seguido y te ahorras todo lo que implica el sacarte la leche.
    1 replies | 108 view(s)
  • @llli*mamawin's Avatar
    Today, 11:45 AM
    My daughter, 9 months, is very similar. Before we started her on solids at 6 months she would often take only 9 or 10 ozs during the day. She's an enthusiastic solids eater, so she now only takes around 6 oz (on a good day). I know the common advice is to reduce solids in order to "force" more milk intake but in her case, it doesn't work. She just eats less overall. Her weight gain was slow during the first 6 months when she was EBF and it has totally rebounded now that she's on solids. It's frustrating knowing she "should" be taking more milk but I am doing my best just to relax and follow her lead. We've started giving her breast milk in a sippy in hopes that she'll take more if she's in control of it. We also make sure that the solids we give her are "substantial" - avocado, sweet potatoes mashed with breast milk, squash roasted in coconut oil, etc. I have every intention to continue breastfeeding until the one-year mark, but I feel like it's going to be a struggle. I envy you that you've almost made it!
    2 replies | 101 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 11:24 AM
    Often moms will experience something we call "the 10 second sizzle" when the baby first latches on. It's something of a misnomer because the pain can last longer than 10 seconds. The important thing is that the pain subsides after the baby has been nursing for a while. What is usually happening in a sizzle situation is that the baby's initial latch is shallow, and the nipple is landing too far forward on the tongue, and is getting compressed between hard palate and tongue, which causes pain. After the baby has been nursing for a while, the nipple is pulled into the ideal position on the back of the tongue under the soft palate, at which point the pain ceases. As long as the shallow latch is not causing nipple damage, this is not an urgent problem, and mom can work on it with the expectation that the baby will grow out of it. As the baby gets bigger, and her mouth gets bigger, she will be able to achieve a deeper latch right from the start. Now, compression from a shallow latch would explain the crease you're seeing when baby comes off the breast. But it sounds like you currently have a lot of milk, so it's possible that in addition to having a shallow initial latch, baby is also purposefully shallowing her latch at different points during the feeding in order to control rapid milk flow. I personally think that you can operate under the assumption that things will improve even if you do nothing. However, I would also like to have you go back and see a...
    2 replies | 40 view(s)
  • @llli*midnightsangel's Avatar
    Today, 10:49 AM
    This might not be helpful but when my son was a few weeks old I also had the same problem. My issue was when I was breaking the seal to get him off of my breast. I wasn't doing that right and I had similar pain to what you're describing. He would clamp down as I tired to get my nipple out and it hurt
    2 replies | 40 view(s)
  • @llli*jessica.holiga's Avatar
    Today, 09:56 AM
    I currently have about 2 oz, but have also struggled with pumping output. One week I might have 3.5 oz extra, and the next be 2 bottles short. I feel like I'm living dangerously every week not knowing if I'll get enough for her normal bottles. ;) But, i think a 10 oz. freezer stash would be ideal.
    2 replies | 83 view(s)
  • @llli*modernmom's Avatar
    Today, 09:36 AM
    I'm hoping someone might be able to give me some advice...my little one is 3 1/2 weeks and I'm still dealing with a pretty painful latch on experience. Normally the pain subsides within the first 20 seconds but it's pretty dreadful knowing I have to go through the initial pain every single time. Here is some other info...when she pulls off, I have a white line through my nipple and I'm pretty sure it's due to her clamping down due to my milk flow (she normally chokes at least once during a feed). Could my pain be due to my nipples being bruised from this? Also, when the air hits my nipples after she pulls off, they sting. She has plenty of wet diapers, seems to be full after nursing, and has been gaining weight with no problems. I did meet with a LC at one week and there were no latch problems. I'll take any suggestions on how to get over this bruised nipple pain/feeling! Thanks so much!
    2 replies | 40 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 09:05 AM
    @llli*mommal replied to a thread Breast pain in Too Much Milk!
    Well, the most likely explanation for the pain/redness is that you have some sort of plugged duct/mastitis/inflammation going on. As long as baby is continuing to drain the breast well and you aren't seeing additional symptoms, this is something to watch but not to worry much about, as it should go away in not too long. If the pain gets worse, or you start seeing additional symptoms (burning, increased pain, baby has evidence of yeast, fever, chills, aches and pains, etc.,) then it's probably time to see the doc.
    1 replies | 58 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 09:02 AM
    That's just how my kids were at 13 months! They didn't start picking up their solid food intake until around 15 months, and even after they started eating more solids they continued to nurse very frequently. Luckily my pediatrician had told me that kids could subsist on breastmilk (or formula) exclusively until 12 months, so I wasn't worried when they were still 99% breastfed at 13 months. It's not like a baby goes from needing only breastmilk on day 364 of life to needing a ton of solids on day 365! Denying your baby the opportunity to nurse until she has consumed some solids is not necessary unless you are very eager to hasten the weaning process. If you are comfortable continuing to nurse, there's no reason to limit your baby's access to nursing. She will pick up on her solid food intake, I promise! I know it's a bit discomfiting when you see other kids chowing down on solids like there is no tomorrow, but remember that your baby is like a lot of other completely normal, healthy breastfed babies- you just happen not to know too many of them!
    7 replies | 151 view(s)
  • @llli*lllkaren's Avatar
    Today, 08:05 AM
    I'm so sorry, alicec1985, we seem to have missed this one! I can imagine how stressful and discouraging it is to have your baby push away when you try to nurse. And I'm sorry the LC wasn't helpful. Did she suggest trying an at-breast supplementer (SNS or Lact-Aid)? I'm wondering if that could be a way to help your baby transition to associating milk with the breast instead of the bottle. Do you know if you have a La Leche League Group near you? There's a map of the Groups in NY here: http://www.lllny.org/local-support.html . I'd definitely recommend getting in touch with the local LLL Leaders for some support. They may also be able to recommend some other LCs who could help you better. Hang in there! You're doing a wonderful thing for your baby by pumping. Exclusive pumping is pretty much the worse of both worlds. :huh I'm in awe of moms who can stick with it as long as you have. Your baby is lucky to have such a dedicated mom!
    1 replies | 136 view(s)
  • @llli*bsua65's Avatar
    Today, 07:19 AM
    I don't have any advice, but my 15 month old nurses day and night and eats 3-5 times a day. Thankfully I have friends whose kids are the same so I haven't worried about it. I just wanted to say you aren't alone :)
    7 replies | 151 view(s)
  • @llli*bsua65's Avatar
    Today, 06:39 AM
    With dom I could still only pump about an ounce per breast but have never managed to be good at pumping. The dom allowed me to ebf and wean off supplements with my daughter regaining her 'lost centiles'. I agree with Alphawoman that it's worth reaching out to Jack Newman. I can only imagine the frustration of 5 specialists and still not knowing what the issue is :(
    4 replies | 139 view(s)
  • @llli*djs.mom's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:34 PM
    I would just always have the food out. So if she doesn't eat much leave the plate out. And I guess I didn't say it but my plate with 5 different things on it obviously isn't a grown up size plate. We used small dessert plates for snacks and those kids size plates with all the little sections in them for meals. And still nurse her the appropriate number of times a day. I don't know about sleep patterns because at that age I was still dealing with 1st year molars, so I wasn't looking for any sleep regularity, but I do specifically remember a huge growth spurt at around 16 months. And the amount of solids he put away considering we still nursed on demand while together, just made me think "Holy crap! Thank god it's not JUST ME." If you haven't started on snacks as well as meals, I would. I would basically make it so that she always had access to solid food during the day and you. So that she could choose solids more often.
    7 replies | 151 view(s)
  • @llli*mollyg.mom's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:51 PM
    Thank you very much for your reply! Ive been sitting her in her high chair and giving her table foods 3 times a day since she was 10 months old. She eats yogurt, cheese, chicken, and broccoli pretty well already. Recently she's been really into fruit, loves apples, grapes, and strawberries. I try not to nurse her until she has at least tried to eat some solid foods. I guess my question is should i avoid offering her the breast all together if she doesn't eat the solids I give her?
    7 replies | 151 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:47 PM
    My experience has been a little different than djsmom. I have nursed three kids well past this age. The oldest started solids at about 5.5 months. The youngest at about 7 months. They ate little at first but then gradually more and more, although solids intake went more slowly with my youngest because they were introduced to solids very differently. (Oldest started with regular meals of spoon fed purees, the youngest we did baby-led solids (aka baby led weaning- there is a book and website if you are interested in what this entails.) They both probably ate small solid meals about three times a day by about a year. My middle son ate almost no solid food until he was 14 months old, although we offered as often and everything we could think of. He was also by far my biggest and fastest growing baby. After 14 months he started eating some, but it still took a while for it to get to be much. I did not experience any differences in their nursing or sleep patterns I could link to solid intake or lack thereof. In fact my oldest child, who started solids the earliest and ate the 'most' solids the most consistently, nursed far more frequently at night as a toddler than the other two. Now my oldest two are 11 and 8. The 8 year old who refused to eat as a baby now puts away close to twice what his older brother does. He is also a child who is in near constant motion so he really needs more. My youngest is 2.5, still nurses, and eats like a typical 2.5 year old which, in my...
    7 replies | 151 view(s)
  • @llli*alphawoman's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:21 PM
    In addition to the excellent advice from the PPs, I'd ask if the same scale was used for all the recent weighings. Scale difference alone at that age can be enough to cause significant error in growth charts. The drop may, in fact, be non-existent!
    3 replies | 485 view(s)
  • @llli*mamaoflittleroo's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:55 PM
    I have been block feeding my 1 month old for three weeks. We have been doing pretty good, thanks to support from a few lovely ladies on the forums. I have a new question. I have been having extreme tenderness in one of my breasts (the one that produces more) and have developed redness on the skin. The color and pain feel similar to a clogged duct and/or mastitis, however my baby has been completely relieving the breast during her feedings. Can anyone give any tips or explanation for the pain and redness that is not accompanied by a clogged duct?
    1 replies | 58 view(s)
  • @llli*mamaoflittleroo's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:47 PM
    I have asked my husband to try and relieve a clogged duct. It did work one time. He wasn't thrilled at the idea, but was more than willing to help due to the amount of pain I was in!
    5 replies | 169 view(s)
  • @llli*djs.mom's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:43 PM
    I would definitely work on more table food. I have a really good eater who I breast fed until he was 4. But he was eating 3 solid meals a day plus 2 snack a day by the year point and that really took a lot of pressure off of me and allowed us to continue. Trying to support a growth spurt with JUST breastmilk after a year is no fun. Plus, the longer you let the solids thing drag out, the longer it takes them to associate solid food with hunger. If you are still providing %75 of her nutrients with your breast than means your child is still in the experimental phase with food. She is exploring it but she doesn't associate it with actually quelling her hunger. I did 100% BLS but we started right at the 6month point. It took him almost 3 months just to swallow and he didn't realize he could "taste" with him tongue until about 10 months old. And even with the 3 meals plus snacks he still didn't associate solids with relieving hunger until between 14 & 15 months old. Things I did to not get into a rut or get a picky eater: I always made a point of putting at least 5 things on his plate at that age. So it felt like he had lots of choices. And even if he rejected stuff he would still be getting 2-3 good healthy foods per meal. Things we liked and used as staples we made on Sunday and then just pulled out of the fridge and warmed up. These staples in my house at that age included Brown Rice, Whole pinto beans and whole wheat pasta. We shopped the perimeter of the store. So he...
    7 replies | 151 view(s)
  • @llli*djs.mom's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:08 PM
    You are OK. The year point is when weaning is supposed to begin. And a lot of mothers at this point actually pump wean or begin to right now. I would definitely ad in 2 snack of you haven't already. And try to give him some high fat foods like avacado and cheese. But a one year old that is still getting 4-5 oz during the day AND feeds on demand while together? Is getting enough milk. Work on adding in healthy fat snacks and cooking with oils like coconut to maximize the amount of calories you are getting during solid meal times.
    2 replies | 101 view(s)
  • @llli*glovitiies's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:50 PM
    My son will be 1 in less than a week. For the past few months he will only drink one 4-5 ounce bottle during his 8 hours at the sitters while I am at work. It is often not an easy task to get him to finish that much. He also will not nurse during that day on the weekends anymore, he will bite and is too distracted. He does nurse before bed and wakes 2-3 times a night to nurse. He eats solids 3 meals a day as well. He has fallen off the weight charts, he currently weighs 18lbs 4oz. I don't know what to do, I can't force him to drink more breastmilk during the day while I am at work. I have always thought that he must just be getting what he needs during the night, but there is obviously no way to tell how many ounces is drinking total. Anyone gone through something similar?
    2 replies | 101 view(s)
  • @llli*mollyg.mom's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:33 PM
    Hi all, I'm new to LLLI and wanted to get some advice and see if anyone has ever been in a similar situation. I have a 13 month old daughter who was EBF until she was almost 9 months old because she just didn't have any interest in solid foods. Now she is 13 months old and she still breast feeds a lot. I'd say probably 75% of her nutrition is from breastmilk still and she still wakes 3 or 4 times a night to nurse. I have been toying with the idea of beginning to night wean her but I worry because she still isn't eating a lot of solids and I don't want to cut down on any nutrition that she's getting. We co-sleep most of the time so it's not a huge issue for me to nurse her throughout the night but I just see so many other babies her age who are sleeping through the night and pack away table food like its nothing and I worry that I'm doing something wrong that she still nurses so much. Any advice or stories would be greatly appreciated! Thanks in advance!!!
    7 replies | 151 view(s)
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