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  • @llli*canne's Avatar
    Today, 02:35 PM
    Great! Thank you all for replying! You all had great info and points to make. I will try with some different ideas at night to keep baby happy during fussy time. And I'm glad to hear the on, off, on, off (and some tugging) is normal during that fussy night time. (Thank goodness when she finally goes to sleep she rests well and when she wakes every 2-4 hrs she eats well and is very willing to nod off to sleep) I'm also glad to read that this typically will not cause any problems as it is not true "breast refusal". I am really trying to drain a breast before I offer the second.... IF I even need to offer the second. Sometimes she will take the second, sometimes not.... and that has been fine with me and her. I do see that she is having plenty of dirty diapers (which are yellow and look like they have the "curd" in them), gaining very well.... so I have been fine with that. I have also been hand expressing a little to give some relief when needed and to try and help with OALD. maddieb: That is correct, no bottles, pacifiers and not pumping at all. I would not be opposed to some of this later if I need to run out and leave some breast milk to give by bottle, etc... but I want that to be down the road. I do not want to cause any nipple confusion... which is what happened with my second baby. :)
    4 replies | 75 view(s)
  • @llli*littlebabyh's Avatar
    Today, 02:21 PM
    Hi Ladies! Thanks for the responses. When she is with the nanny during the day. She is given 5 oz of my expressed milk. For the last month she has been drinking all of it without any spit ups. As an update, when I nursed her this morning before I left for work, she did spit up quite a bit. To me that is weird since she hasn't been fed for almost 12 hours, there is no way she's not hungry! During the day today she had 2 bottles so far and she hasn't spit up at either one of those. We feed her on a schedule as thats what our pediatrician suggested and from all the numerous books. Schedules = happy baby = happy parents? Am I wrong here? I'm a first time mom and all the suggestions from my friends say to stay on a schedule so everyone is sane. I would love some input here as well. Thanks mommies!
    5 replies | 120 view(s)
  • @llli*leemami's Avatar
    Today, 12:48 PM
    Hola! Me alegro que haya ayudado! Si el pezon tiene forma de lapiz labial nuevo, y por los chasquidos, seguramente tienes que corregir el acople. Hay muchos videos en linea que puedes ver si lo necesitas o si la asesora de lactancia puede ayudarte, seria muy bueno! Lo importante es que apenas el bebe abra la boca para el acople, introduzcas el pezon lo mas que puedas, de manera que la boca del bebe cubra casi toda la areola, sobre todo la parte del labio inferior, si es posible. Hay mamas que tienen pechos grandes, asi que puede variar. Tambien es importante que no queden "labios de pez" en el bebe. Siempre recomiendo los videos de Dr. Newman http://www.breastfeedinginc.ca/content.php?pagename=videos-spanish Aqui mas o menos se ve... http://www.breastfeedinginc.ca/content.php?pagename=vid-28hrassist-span
    4 replies | 134 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 12:35 PM
    Try not to be paranoid. I assume your paranoia is that your baby will start refusing to nurse and you have to EP and bottle feed again. This is unlikely! Breastfed babies nurse a lot of the time. In general they feed much longer and more often than bottle fed babies, even babies who are bottle fed breastmilk. so fussiness during a feeding is normal. They have to fuss sometimes, being babies, and since breastfed babies are at the breast so much, it happens at the breast too. It is also entirely normal for baby to cluster nurse part of the day and not want to nurse as much other times. In other words if baby is super fussy and not wanting to nurse, don't worry as baby will nurse again soon. When it comes down to it, there are two breastfeeding issues that tend to require breastfeeding assessment. And even these do not necessarily require much intervention, it depends. Those issues are, Nursing is painful for mom and/or baby is not gaining well nursing. Way down the list in terms of frequency would be severe overproduction that is causing issues for mom and baby like breast REFUSAL (not fussiness or pulling off, but out and out refusal to nurse) and painful engorgement. Everything else usually requires only fine tuning, patience, and learning each other. Yes. I suggest, Nurse as frequently as baby will, fine to offer if its been an hour or two or you are starting to feel at all "full". If baby will not nurse and you are getting very full, try a little hand expression...
    4 replies | 75 view(s)
  • @llli*mazeejay's Avatar
    Today, 12:21 PM
    We're back! He gained 3 oz. I am so happy! They've extended our weight checks to every 2 weeks now. Thank you Ladies for the tips and encouragement!
    7 replies | 356 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Today, 11:30 AM
    All generally sounds very normal. Now I don't personally have any experience with OALD. However, My LO had posterior tongue tie and lip tie and the weakness in his mouth, tongue, and jaw meant that even with my slow flow he would sometimes choke/splutter. So if the problem seems to be anything more than just OALD, get baby evaluated for tongue tie and disorganized suck since problems or weakness there can make it hard for baby to protect the airway and therefore they may have more issues with choking and swallowing even if the flow isn't really powerful. We not only needed to get the tonuge and lip ties corrected but we also needed oral motor therapy to allow DS to transfer milk effectively. That said, the evening fussy time is REALLY NORMAL. It can often be a combo of many things at the end of the day, being over tired, over stimulated, wanting to cluster feed, etc. Mine would fight sleep like it was trying to kill him generally right around dinner time.
    4 replies | 75 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 11:05 AM
    For fast letdowns: - Keep using reclined positions but experiment with different positions; you never know what might help. - If you have a true oversupply, let us know and we'll talk you through block feeding (if necessary). - Avoid pumping, as it will only increase/perpetuate oversupply. - Use the "finish the first breast first" approach to nursing. With FTFBF, you allow baby unrestricted time on side A, offering side B only when pulls off side A on her own. If she doesn't want side B after finishing side A, don't sweat it. Just offer B first at the next feeding. - Don't worry too much about baby developing fussiness at the breast. Some fussiness is normal and the best way to treat it is usually to let the baby learn how to control your milk flow. It can be a frustrating process for her, but in time she will master the art of generating the flow she wants. Nighttime fussiness is 100% normal! The thing where the baby nurses and then gets mad because she got more milk than she wanted is also very typical. Try the following: - Nurse, nurse, nurse, and nurse some more. Baby can't fuss when there's a breast in her mouth. - Calm house. Lights, TV, and stereo turned down or preferably off.
    4 replies | 75 view(s)
  • @llli*wiggle.bug's Avatar
    Today, 10:55 AM
    I had a couple work trips away from my first, once when he was just over 2 for 3 days, and then almost a week when he was 2.5. My experience is much the same as maddieb's: both times, I brought a pump and pumped in the morning, around 5 pm, and then at bedtime (those were the times he'd nurse, and I was also pretty full those times). In both cases, he went back to nursing just fine when we were together again. He nursed until he was over 3 years old.
    5 replies | 157 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Today, 10:54 AM
    With the oversupply and probable OALD, Unlatching baby and letting the spray from OALD flow into a towel before putting baby back to the breast is probably a good idea to help with the spit up/fussy issue. Sounds like a major over supply but since you are going back to work soon you probably want to be very careful about reducing the supply too much with block feeding right before going back to work (since supply can suddenly drop when going back to work) so definitely come back for links to articles about the Dos and don'ts of block feeding.
    8 replies | 74 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Today, 10:42 AM
    You can likely order the adapters, and disks along with any other items you need (like extra rings and the sealing rings) online and get them quickly. I found (if I must use bottles at all) I really like the Lanisnoh mOmma nipples which fit the Avent bottles, seems to more accurately match the latch for my breasts than the nipples with a long narrow teet meeting a wide base.
    8 replies | 177 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Today, 10:35 AM
    Does she seem satisfied when she falls to sleep? Or exhausted from effort and hunger? Most young babies take longer to feed but if you have a very ample supply and active letdown, then it is quite possible baby is getting plenty of milk in a short time. If in doubt you can see an LC (preferably an IBCLC http://www.ilca.org/i4a/pages/index.cfm?pageid=3901) and have her do a weighted feeding (that is weight right before feeding and then again right after feeding in the same clothing/diaper) to find out how much baby manages to take in during that one feeding. I agree that bottles and pumping are not a good indication since babies can very easily be over fed with a bottle and pumping is not a good way to judge supply. How has baby's weight gain been so far? Any concerns with weight gain or health? Any concerns with your health or supply? How does nursing FEEL to you? Do you make efforts to wake baby, switch breasts etc when feeding? Can you get baby to wake and feed sooner if you feel the need? Remember that demand feeding or scheduling should always err on the side of feeding sooner and that mom gets a say about when it's been long enough not just baby. Granted mom can only offer to nurse since you can't force breastfeed a baby.
    3 replies | 81 view(s)
  • @llli*hayashi's Avatar
    Today, 10:07 AM
    Perhaps you can ask the cafe staff for a quiet spot to pump? I am always told that Europe is a friendlier place for breastfeeding moms. Medela Pump-In-Style backpack or tote looks like a normal bag if you want to carry it around. Hope this works out for you!
    8 replies | 253 view(s)
  • @llli*hayashi's Avatar
    Today, 10:05 AM
    I don't have the luxury to transfer to Avent bottle right after pumping because I pump at work and I don't have bag space to carry 10 bottles of two different brands. The Medela-Avent adapters is great idea! I found them in Babies R Us for US$10. I wish I knew about them sooner! Although, with the adapters, I also have to order Avent bottle sealing disks online because Avent bottles with nipples don't fit in Medela handheld cooler bag that came with the pump. Thanks for all the suggestions!
    8 replies | 177 view(s)
  • @llli*alyssa.martin.ab's Avatar
    Today, 09:43 AM
    as far as equal time on each breast i do not know. i do switch side to side but it seems like my right breast produces a lot more milk. i have noticed he seems happier when he nurses from the left breast. so i have squeezed a little milk out of the right until the flow slows down and then nurse him. then he spits up a ton then he cries then he gives hunger cues so i put him back on the breast (right side) and then hes fussy and then i can eventually calm him down to sleep. but when he nurses on the left side its like heaven!
    8 replies | 74 view(s)
  • @llli*alyssa.martin.ab's Avatar
    Today, 09:40 AM
    i just feed him on 1 breast...he usually falls asleep. i have tried block feeding as well and let him nurse 2 or 3 times on 1 breast (althought the other one becomes so large and engorged i pump the other breast, i might be taking too much out). i figured i had an oversupply. when we went to his 3 week check up he had already gained 2 1/5 pounds. he's now almost 5 weeks and is about 10 pounds. hoping the block feeding helps. thanks again for the advice
    8 replies | 74 view(s)
  • @llli*canne's Avatar
    Today, 09:23 AM
    Hi - It's been a couple of years since I have had to post any questions. I have two children and for various reasons I couldn't nurse them (nipple shield, bad LC advice, etc). I EP'd with my first for 8 months and my second child for 14 months. I recently had my third baby... who is three weeks old. I had a home birth and she nursed right away. So far things have been going great this time around (thank goodness). She is gaining weight very well, plenty of wet/dirties a day, I no longer am sore and her latch has only improved over these three weeks. My concern is this.... for the past three days or so, while she is nursing and I have a let down, I have noticed she is starting to choke some and gets somewhat frustrated. I do NOT want to create a situation where she is fussy at the breast.... I'm paranoid to have that happen again, especially since I am finally BF'ing a baby. I have tried to pull her off until my let down stops, recline and lay back while nursing, etc. I haven't seen any of these things really help. I DO know I have plenty of milk. I have with my other two and so I am not surprised I do this time around too. Does anyone have any experience with this and any tips on how to keep her happy at the breast and manage this flow? Also, as she ages, will she get better with controlling the flow herself?? My other question is about night time fussiness. I do believe she is doing her night time cluster feeding anywhere from 8-10 or 8-11 PM every night....
    4 replies | 75 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 09:21 AM
    Whoa, that's a lot of milk! A more typical pumping amount, when pumping instead of nursing, would be just 2-4 oz total. Combine the large pump amount with the leaking and discomfort, and it sounds like you have some significant oversupply going on. How about working on getting that to back off a bit? Then both you and baby will be more comfortable! Here's how I would start: next time you are going to pump, take 2-4 oz and then stop. Take more only if you are extremely uncomfortable. But try to leave some milk sitting in the breast, as that will signal your body to reduce production. If that doesn't lead to a reduced supply, it might be a good idea to do some block feeding. So throttle back on the pumping for a few days and see if there's any change. If not, we'll talk you through block feeding. Okay? Oh- are you doing things like trying to offer both breasts at each feeding, or trying to get baby to spend equal time on each breast?
    8 replies | 74 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 09:15 AM
    :ita with Maddieb. If it was MRSA that caused the mastitis, there's an extremely good likelihood that both mom and baby are colonized and therefore the milk would not be introducing new bacteria into the baby's system. Still, if that was the case and mom was concerned, scalding the mastitis milk would be an option, as it would kill the bacteria.
    2 replies | 82 view(s)
  • @llli*alyssa.martin.ab's Avatar
    Today, 09:15 AM
    THANK YOU for the replies and encouragement. i return to work in a little less than 2 weeks. so he will be taking a bottle for most of the day but when im home i plan on nursing him..especially through the night. i do pump 2x a day now because if i dont feed him or pump every 2 hours i have very large painful breasts and they leak through my bra and shirt. this morning i pumped 10 0z total about 5 from each breast.
    8 replies | 74 view(s)
  • @llli*erin.in.middletown's Avatar
    Today, 09:14 AM
    The above response covers everything really well. I too encourage you to reach out for help if PPD may be something you're experiencing. Both from professionals, but also from the folk who love you. Is there a partner in the picture who can take over many of the household things, cook you some nourishing meals, run the vacuum, do the laundry, etc? Are there neighbors that can swing by to walk the dogs, mom or mother in law that could swing by to hold a baby, bounce a baby, after you have nursed and bring baby to you when baby wants to nurse again so that you can get a nap or take a bath or just have a moment to yourself to do whatever? You are not a failure, mama. This is something that takes time and practice to learn. It is a biological and physiological norm, yes, but it still is a very coordinated act between two people-- one of Whom's digestive system is still maturing and who has only been on this earth for a very short time, and one of Whom's milk supply is still regulating and adjusting and getting fine tuned until about twelve weeks or so, and who is recovering from a big physical feat (birth!) that comes with a whole host of hormone-shenanigans. I would so encourage you to don't give up on nursing yet. It does get easier with practice and support.
    8 replies | 74 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 09:12 AM
    My pediatrician tested my kids for iron at around 9-10 months.
    7 replies | 185 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 09:10 AM
    Excellent advice from Erin.in.Middletown. Even from the very earliest ages, babies have variable feeding speeds. Some get all they need in just 5-10 minutes at the breast, others take closer to an hour. So judge her intake by her nappies and weight gain, not by the bottle and not by the amount of time she spends at the breast. If your baby is difficult to wind, remember that it is not always necessary to wind a breastfed baby. I personally never bothered, since my kids preferred to let gas out at the bottoms of their digestive systems. Pretty funny to see a little baby fart like a grown man, complete with facial expressions of effort and pleasurable relief, but much easier than trying to get a burp out of them!
    3 replies | 81 view(s)
  • @llli*canne's Avatar
    Today, 09:07 AM
    In my opinion, and from personal experience.... pumping is HARD work and if you can nurse and work through any issues you have.... it is SO WORTH IT! I EP'd with my first two (could not nurse due to various issues) and it was exhausting. I pumped 8 months with my first and 14 months with my second. I ALWAYS wished I could nurse them. So much faster, easier, LESS exhausting, and healthier. Now, I have a third baby (three weeks old) and we are exclusively NURSING.... and I am so thankful. Honestly.... I do NOT think you should go to bottles.... keep up the nursing!
    8 replies | 74 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 09:05 AM
    I agree with the PPs. Spit-up is generally nothing to be concerned about. Schedules- unless they are ones designed by the baby him/herself- are generally a lot more problematic, since they are associated with supply failure and inadequate milk intake. The exception to this general rule is schedules which result in the baby being nursed more than he/she would otherwise demand. My guess is that your baby is spitting up at night because she is going a really long time without eating. When she finally nurses, the breast is full and flowing fast, and baby is really hungry, leading to her taking in a very large meal. And a very large meal is more likely to result in spit-up; when the baby's tummy is very full, it's more likely that some milk will slip past the weak sphincter at the top of the stomach.
    5 replies | 120 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    18 replies | 8955 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 08:53 AM
    Most babies do. It's so easy to get milk out of a bottle. The flow is constant, never too fsat or too slow for baby's preference. It takes almost no skill to get milk out of a bottle- in fact, a bottle will just drip milk into baby's mouth when he's not even sucking. So the fact that your baby enjoyed his bottle isn't a special sign that you should switch to bottles. I would do this ONLY if you have absolutely no other option. Bottles deliver easy meals, but easier does not mean healthier!!! Bottle-feeding is associated with increased risk of overfeeding, premature loss of milk supply, and dental problems, both tooth decay and improper tooth alignment. Exclusive pumping (EP) is exponentially harder than nursing, for the following reasons: - It is harder to maintain/increase supply when pumping. Many EP moms struggle with supply.
    8 replies | 74 view(s)
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