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  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 06:04 PM
    Hi! There are many options to consider when a nursing mom is returning to work. So it would help to have a few more details. Do you want to keep nursing when you are home, and have caregiver give baby formula when at work? Or do you prefer to wean baby entirely from the breast, and formula feed exclusively? Is it your decision that it will be too hard to pump, or would you prefer to pump but work is not cooperating? Would you be interested in trouble shooting any anticipated issues with pumping? If you needed to for your own health and comfort, could you pump or hand express milk at work for any amount of time or frequency, even if it wasn't enough to make enough milk to leave for baby? It would also help to know how old baby is, if you seem to make more than enough or just enough or a little less than enough for baby at this point, how many times in 24 hours baby nurses, and about what the separation times each day will be once you are back at work.
    1 replies | 5 view(s)
  • @llli*npahl's Avatar
    Today, 05:45 PM
    I have to start back to work in 4 weeks and I would like to start weaning my baby to formula because it's going to be too hard to pump at work. Any suggestions on how I do that? She will take a bottle if I pump. Just not sure if I should use supplement formula or just the regular that I'm going to use.
    1 replies | 5 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 04:22 PM
    Hi! 7 ounces per side certainly is a lot to pump, but how long had it been since baby nursed? If a mom has a large breast storage capacity and it has been some time since baby nursed, then she is going to pump out much more milk than average. This output certainly suggests you make plenty of milk, probably more than baby needs, but whether this means you have problematic overproduction is not clear from the info provided- possible, yes, but not certain. Is baby gaining with a well above average rate? You want to be sure that reducing production is safe. Did you ever try just regular block nursing (without the "full drainage" part) and was that not effective? Now that you have already done a "full drainage" then you do not need to do it again, necessarily, correct? Now you just block nurse. The problem with the full drainage part is that fully draining the breast regularly (even once a day) -or pumping at all if baby is exclusively nursed- is that pumping tends to increase production. My understanding is that the full drainage part of FDBF is for moms who are having difficulty reducing production using just block feeding, especially when the OP is leading to serious health issues (ie- breast infections, painful plugs) for mom. A baby being uncomfortable, very gassy, and having mucousy, explosive poops- or even blood in poops- is usually not indicative of a serious health issue even if the lactose overload is the cause. This does not mean do not block nurse, if it is...
    1 replies | 26 view(s)
  • @llli*gold86en's Avatar
    Today, 04:01 PM
    I just wanted to say thanks to stw for coming back to this thread and letting us know how everything turned out! It's good to hear the dilemma was worked out! Thanks for the update!
    5 replies | 1002 view(s)
  • @llli*luckyduck28's Avatar
    Today, 12:24 PM
    I'm looking for some advice regarding oversupply, lactose overload in baby and full drainage and block feeding. My lb is four months old. From very young he started to show the following symptoms: congestion; mucus explosive nappies; sleeplessness; fussing at the breast; arching; terrible wind and tummy cramps etc etc. He had a 90% tongue tie cut at five weeks old. From early on I realised I had oversupply. Milk would leak constantly and would spray out all over the place. I would go through tons of breast pads a day. Through my own research online I decided that his symptoms may be due to food allergies. I subsequently cut out dairy (told my doc about this, she agreed but didn't know much about bf, just let me get on with it) I thought I saw some improvement but not much. Over the coming months is cut out more and more foods in the constant search for what he was allergic too. Symptoms might appear to get better but then would get worse. Culminated in blood in his stool and a trip to accident and emergency. Paediatrician there told me she didn't think it was allergies as I had already cut out all major ones and more. She told me to go back on normal food too see what happened. I did that and there was no change. So through more research I finally came upon the lactose overload oversupply information. This seems to perfectly describe his symptoms and confirmed that I did have oversupply. So long story short I have decided to go down the full drainage block feeding method. I...
    1 replies | 26 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 12:01 PM
    A normal nursing frequency for a young baby is anywhere between 8x per day and 10-12x, or even more, per day. The feeding pattern is unlikely to be clockwork. Sometimes the baby is going to take a long nap, so feedings may be a little more widely spaced. And sometimes the baby is going to be in cluster feeding mode, so feedings are going to be almost non-stop. The baby will nurse, and you'll put him down, and then he will want to nurse again almost immediately. When babies are taking smaller amounts, they are likely to nurse more frequently, so if the scale indicates that baby got 2 oz or less, it would be completely normal for him to want to feed 10 minutes later, or an hour later, or 2 hours later. The more often you put him to the breast, the better, because more nursing = better supply. It sounds like you got advice somewhere along the way that babies "should" have regular eat/play/sleep routines. There's a lot of this sort of stuff floating out there in the baby advice biz- it sells a ton of books because it promises a predictable life and a happy baby, though neither of those things are anything any responsible person would promise you. Am I correct? If so, I would suggest changing your mindset about what is normal and what babies actually need. Normal: feeding frequently, erratically, being hungry right after "finishing" a feeding. Normal: not being interested in play at just 8 weeks old. "Play" for an 8 week-old baby can occur at the breast- baby...
    9 replies | 224 view(s)
  • @llli*mamanoah's Avatar
    Today, 11:32 AM
    I joined LLLI because this is exactly what my little is going through (turned 16w yesterday) and I am at a loss. He was a very punctual eater -- every two hours -- and now can go 4-6 hours without eating much at all. This morning I fed him on all fours and realized I need help! I don't have suggestions but wanted you to know you are certainly not alone.
    2 replies | 133 view(s)
  • @llli*dormir41's Avatar
    Today, 07:32 AM
    Morning! It sounds like you have done a lot of work already. Kudos to you! It sounds like you are doing most of the things recommended to get baby back to the breast. What stands out to me is your comment about her wanting an instant reward. Have you tried expressing a bit of breastmilk and leaving it on your nipple when you try to latch on baby? When my little one was a newborn and wanted milk instantly, that helped to coax her to nurse. No idea if you've seen this kellymom article, but linking it in case you haven't and might find it helpful. It's written for newborns, but there are techniques in there that could work for older babies too: http://kellymom.com/ages/newborn/nb-challenges/back-to-breast/
    1 replies | 110 view(s)
  • @llli*jessie90's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:44 PM
    Definitely makes sense! I am willing to try anything to skip supplementing! When you say nursing more frequently, with 2 oz feed, how often would you say that is. Every 2 hours? Because I can't quite get my head around the timing of it all. If we nurse for 30 mins, then playtime for 15-30 mins, there is only 1 h left for putting to sleep and actual nap (which would be around 30-40 mins then) Is that enough?!? With the pumping - if the ml consumed start to drop meaning my supply is dwindling down again, wouldn't it be extremely hard to get it back up? The stress of losing my milk is almost unbearable to me after endless nights of pumping. Also he still squashes my nipples. It's no longer painful but they do come out with a crease line across them. Is that an indicative sign that he is not nursing effectively? I don't think he does empty the breast well because there is so much more milk pumped after the feed but maybe he actually nurses fine and its normal to have that much milk left?
    9 replies | 224 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:08 PM
    This is a great question! It really speaks to the heart of the concerns of a lot of moms: how do you KNOW when you can safely skip the supplemental bottle and just nurse? Part of the reason this is a great question is that it is a tricky one. On the one hand, if the baby is able to transfer milk well, then you can just put him back on the breast and trust that if he wants to eat, he will find a way to get milk out because even a breast that feels empty still has milk in it. But if you have a baby who has difficulty transferring milk, putting him back on the breast may mean a lot of effort for little gain. I think the way to sort this dilemma out is with time, and the scale. You have a healthy, growing baby, right? That means you have time to play with your baby's feeding pattern, because it's not like he's a scrawny baby who is in danger of failing to thrive. He can withstand a couple of days of you trying something new, even if it means his intake is a bit lower than ideal for that couple of days. So if this were my baby, I would try to skip the supplement any time the scale indicated that the baby got 60-70 ml at the breast. This may mean that he will want to nurse again very soon after he last nursed, and that's fine- unless it makes you too sore, in which case you might want to take a break, and give him a small bottle while you pump. But that's just one approach! You could also give very small supplemental bottles after he nurses- let's say 30-50 ml....
    9 replies | 224 view(s)
  • @llli*isabelofmtl's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:02 PM
    I have a3.5 yo DD and a 6 mo DS. I also dislike resorting to TV or iPad but I will use those tools if needed. My DS is at that distracted stage, maybe at the tail end? Crossing my fingers... Anyway, another thing I find I can do to nurse him with DD around is to do side lying in my bed with dd on my other side. The baby can't see his sister and she is quiet because we're lying down, putting the baby to sleep or whatever the explanation needs to be. If dd gets bored, she can go play by herself in another room. Or she can bring books and "read" quietly behind me while I nurse. I also use a sound machine, which helps smooth out startling noises.
    7 replies | 491 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:59 PM
    Hi insimom. It is rarely a good idea to pump and bottle feed rather than breastfeed. It is something that can be done if baby cannot nurse for some reason, of course. But more typically, assuming baby actually needs supplements, (breastmilk or formula in bottles) they can be given while mom and baby continue to nurse and work on improving milk transfer or milk production, or both, whichever is required. Additionally, a newborn being sleepy at the breast, nursing for long periods, and drinking a bottle after nursing are not reliable indicators that baby is not getting enough milk at the breast. We have very little info here. We would need to know baby's age and complete weight check history, how much baby is given in bottles daily, poop output, etc to even begin to advise you with much specificity. Since you are bottle feeding and thinking that is required, that indicates breastfeeding is in trouble or soon will be. My best suggestion in that case would be to seek in person help asap- a board cert. Lactation consultant (IBCLC) or volunteer breastfeeding helper like a LLL leader. Generally for a sleepy baby, you want to try to make sure latch is good. Breast compressions and/or switching sides can help baby stay more awake. Stroking baby, pumping the hand or foot, verbally encouraging baby, jiggling baby's chin etc to "rev up" baby again can also help. If baby needs supplements, giving baby a very small amount of supplement prior to nursing may give baby the...
    1 replies | 129 view(s)
  • @llli*jessie90's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:21 PM
    Thank you for all the help! The only problem I have with putting him back on the breast after he acts hungry post feed is that my breasts have so little milk in them that he just suckles on them. He doesn't swallow anything. If that's the case is there really a point of making him sit at the breast? Last question. If we keep going at this rate and he finally eats enough of the breast if I stop pumping will my supply significantly decrease? I would love to ditch the pump sooner rather than later but I'm scared I'm "over supplying" now (been pumping since he was 2 weeks) and if I stop pumping my milk will decrease and he won't be able to get the oz he needs out of the breast. I feel he goes for the easy milk and is not willing to work for the harder one.
    9 replies | 224 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:35 PM
    Thanks for bumping- I meant to get back to you but then life/kids/stuff got in the way. Baby not taking the bottle: this is a tough issue. The only thing you can do is too keep trying different approaches. Different milk temperatures, different bottles, baby held more upright, worn in a sling, etc. something should click, if you give it enough time. Increased supplements at night: if baby is truly not taking enough during the day, it may be a good idea to feed him more at night. I would watch his behavior and diaper output very carefully- if he still seems hungry after feedings at night, or his diaper output drops below adequate, you may need to up the supplements. But I wouldn't worry about this yet! It's not an emergency situation, and hopefully he's going to get the hang of daytime bottles soon. Regarding pumping enough for supplemeting and for the next day's separation: you are right, this may not be possible! Do what you can with the pump, and use formula to cover any gaps. That's what it's for! Here's how you minimize milk wastage: - Do not mix breastmilk and formula in the same bottle unless baby refuses plain formula. Unfinished formula must be discarded after about 1 hour, but unfinished breastmilk can go back in the fridge.
    28 replies | 1357 view(s)
  • @llli*cas.tex's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:30 PM
    Hi! Yes, same scale and nude. Nurses. 10-12 times a day Wet diapers around 6-8, dirty diapers that aren't just streaks are about 2-3 Before formula her 'scoopable' poops where maybe one and they where yellowish/brown Nursing feels good, I can tell that she is emptying them pretty fully. She starts off gulping, then dozes off some and does some soft sucking until I believe I get another let down and I hear more gulping. I usually have to mess with her a few times during feeding and wake her with burping between breasts. She spends about 20-35 minutes nursing. Thanks
    2 replies | 106 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:24 PM
    Welcome to the forum! Questions for you: - Has the baby always been weighed on the same scale, and in the nude? Or has she been weighed on a variety of scales, and states of dress/undress? - How often does baby nurse, in a 24 hour period? - What is the baby's wet/poop diaper output? - What were the baby's poops like before you started supplementing with formula? Were they yellow or green? When she pooped, was the amount "scoopable"- that is, could you scoop the poop up in a teaspoon, or did it soak right into the diaper? - How does nursing feel? - Does the baby fall asleep while nursing? If so, does she seem to start dozing relatively early in the feeding?
    2 replies | 106 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:19 PM
    Your measurements weren't wrong- what's wrong is the fact that the rest of the world uses metric, and the US is still stubbornly mired in pounds and ounces and acres and feet! :lol If this were my baby, and he ate 2 oz and then still seems hungry, I think I would just keep switching him from breast to breast until he seemed satisfied. Even if that resulted in very short intervals between feedings. The caveat is that if he truly cannot transfer milk well enough, or nursing is really hurting you, then it may be advisable to stop the feed at a certain point and give a bottle so that you can go pump. This is what makes the scale such a useful tool; using it, you can determine whether the baby is really flagging at the breast and needs a supplement, or whether he's doing pretty well and you can just tough it out and keep nursing. Remember, the breast is never really empty- milk is being made even as it is being removed. At 8 weeks, falling asleep after feeding is something you probably can't expect to happen after every feeding. Baby's old enough to have some alert time between feedings. It's textbook normal to have smaller feedings occurring at shorter intervals during the evening- that's what cluster feeding is. A 1.35 oz feeding is fine, as long as baby has another one a short while later. If you offer both breasts, you're feeling sore, and baby has only take 40 ml, I would give him a small supplement- 30 ml is fine- and then offer the breast again. If he...
    9 replies | 224 view(s)
  • @llli*cas.tex's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:14 PM
    My daughter is 2 1/2 weeks & latches great. Birth 6.4lbs-1 week 5.11lbs- 2 weeks 5.11lbs. The Dr is concerned because she hasn't gained & is still jaundice but since she has a great latch she was going to give her one more week before we start needing to supplement and worry. It's been 5 days and she still hasn't gained and has started acting hungry after I feed her and is eating way more often 2-2 1/2hrs instead of 3 and she is also very lethargic and wakes up crying frantically for food. Yesterday I started giving her an ounce of formula on top of what she is getting from me during two feedings and it was like she was a different baby. Happy, content and stayed awake happy for once. I've pumped a few times and at most I get 1 1/2 ounces, but usually get only an ounce. I didn't make enough for my first baby by 2 months so Im worried the same thing is happening. I want to do the best for my baby and hate the idea that I'm starving her. Help please
    2 replies | 106 view(s)
  • @llli*zachary.smommy's Avatar
    28 replies | 1357 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:02 PM
    Awesome! Thanks for the update.
    14 replies | 392 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:02 PM
    As long as you are feeding on demand, and you are willing to offer the second breast if the baby comes off the first still seeming hungry, and the baby is having adequate wet/poop diaper output and weight gain, there is absolutely no need to monkey with the pump or worry about losing supply. The doctor's advice would be good if the baby was having trouble gaining weight and you were struggling with supply. But under normal circumstances, there is just no need for a mom to pump as long as she is home with her baby!
    1 replies | 116 view(s)
  • @llli*insimom's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:21 PM
    Use madela nipple shield .. It helped me a lot .. I havebeenthrough ur situation
    3 replies | 326 view(s)
  • @llli*insimom's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:19 PM
    My baby latches on and sucks for couple of mins and falls asleep when I put her down she awakes and again wants to be on my breast, this way I keep on nursing her for hours and she still remain hungry .. If I give her bottle she eats immediately easily 2-4 oz. How do I make her nurse effectively? Should I pump n give her bottle ? My body does not respond to pump well too
    1 replies | 129 view(s)
  • @llli*insimom's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:10 PM
    I have gone through same. I started using madela nipple shield and in a day started feeling better. I have been nursing my new born since last 3 weeks with nipple shield
    3 replies | 206 view(s)
  • @llli*mehouseholder2's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:07 PM
    First, thanks so much for the advice! Its good to know that there are some answers! He is at daycare from about 7am, till about 4pm. Sometimes he is there until 4:30, depending on when my husband can pick him up. He gets nursed typically between 3-5 am, and then between 6-6:30am before he goes, depending on his mood/fussiness. He hates having to get up in the morning (who can blame him really) I have been thinking he is being overfed for about a month now...I had been sending bags with 5 oz in them...but have (this week) switched to 4 oz bags, or 3.5 oz bags. I did notice that yesterday when I nursed him all day ( I stayed home to try and boost supply), he was perfectly content with nursing every 2 hours, and getting what I thought was 3-4 oz at each feeding. I do believe that I have communicated effectively that they are not to get rid of breastmilk. Sending the bottles might be the next step, as opposed to letting them warm up the bags and place in bottles. I'm also going to request that they only use the small bottle I sent with him, not the 8 oz larger one. Good idea! Today, I have successfully pumped 3-4 oz at each pumping (having pumped 3 times).
    7 replies | 308 view(s)
  • @llli*mackeroo2013's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:21 PM
    Hi. Today at my 6-week postpartum check-up, after telling Dr. that my 6 week old baby feeds off one breast every 2 hours(she pulls off or falls asleep), Dr. advised me to pump the other breast that she didn't feed off of. Then two hours after pumping, offer Babe that same pumped breast. I told Dr. I was leery of the pump since I don't want to make more milk than my baby needs. My doctor was concerned that I would start losing my milk. Is this true? Should I be pumping my other breast?
    1 replies | 116 view(s)
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