Happy Mothers Breastfed Babies

Activity Stream

Filter
Sort By Time Show
Recent Recent Popular Popular Anytime Anytime Last 7 Days Last 7 Days Last 30 Days Last 30 Days All All Photos Photos Forum Forums
  • @llli*zambomommy's Avatar
    Today, 04:00 PM
    Hi, My baby will be starting daycare next week (when she turns 8 months) and is currently being looked after by my parents. She does not drink a lot of milk during the day, and typically my mom and dad are pretty hands on and force feed her at least a couple of ounces (around 6oz) while I am at work. I pump around 6-8 oz at work (2-3 pumping sessions, and I nurse my baby during lunch. This is our schedule: nurse at 6:00am, nurse at 8:00am, solids at 9:30am, bottle (1.5-2oz) at 11am, nurse at 12:30pm, solids at 1:30pm, bottle (1.5-2 oz) at 2:30pm, bottle (2oz) at 4:30pm,
    0 replies | 0 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 02:08 PM
    Ok yes that sounds similar to what I experienced. I also had OP/OALD with first child, but I still think there must be a connection between that and let down pain at least some of the time because the things that helped with the fast letdown and OP (time and encouraging frequent nursing) helped with the let down pain as well. I kept feeling it for quite awhile, but as time went in it became more and more clearly linked to a longer time lapse between nursing sessions.
    3 replies | 50 view(s)
  • @llli*arin-dn's Avatar
    Today, 11:42 AM
    It is like the letdown I felt with my other kids just quite a bit more painful. I lasts just a few minutes, if that. I do definitely have an overactive let down. I don't feel like I have as much OP as I did with my daughter, but I do have plenty of milk. He's already learned to handle the letdown pretty well, has a great latch, ext. This is the only issue we've had so far and it just kinda caught me off guard as I haven't dealt with it before.
    3 replies | 50 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 11:21 AM
    I had very painful letdown with my 2nd after not feeling anything at all at letdown with my first. In all other ways nursing was entirely painless and going great. I also had pain with letdown with my third, but we were having so many other issues (Super engorged, massive plug and mastitis) that let down pain was the least of my worries. Anyway, I always suspected overproduction contributed to the let down pain. I also found it hurt way worse if baby was not nursing and I let down. So when I felt a letdown I would grab baby and try to get him to nurse. I also encouraged baby to nurse often in general to tame the fast flow and I think this helped with letdown pain as well. I would also hand express a little if he would not nurse when I started letting down. I found the pain definitely lessened over time, after the OP began calming down. But I felt let downs for a long time...they just no longer were painful. Can you describe the pain and how long it lasts?
    3 replies | 50 view(s)
  • @llli*arin-dn's Avatar
    Today, 10:32 AM
    Hi everyone! I am nursing my 3rd baby who is 4 weeks old. This time around letdown has been way more painful than I remember it being with either of my other 2 kids. It is especially painful when it happens when he isn't eating. Does anyone know why this would happen or ways to help it be less painful? Thanks!
    3 replies | 50 view(s)
  • @llli*lina.in.la's Avatar
    Today, 10:04 AM
    Hi there. My daughter was also a 30-weeker and I exclusively breastfed her once she came home at 35 weeks. I had to pump a little to relieve pressure for about 2 weeks before my supply decreased to match her intake. She is 5.5 months old now and has gained EXTREMELY well on just my milk. So it can be done!
    4 replies | 588 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:29 PM
    Hi aranel. When a situation is this complicated (baby completely bottle fed and apparently having difficulty nursing) I truly think the best course is to see a board certified lactation consultant (IBCLC) for a complete, private consult. Have you done this already or is this possible for you? I am not saying there is nothing you can do on your own. Of course there is- but an in person consult with someone experienced with getting a baby back to the breast is likely to save you a ton of time and trouble and very much increase your chances for success. The short answer is gradually. Once you can encourage baby to nurse with more vigor or interest, you can start slowly reducing supplements while watching weight gain and output- poops and pees. (Some breastfed babies stop pooping with much frequency at this age and in that case you would watch pees.) Once you can reduce supplements or as you do so, you can reduce the pumping. Nipple shields can actually be helpful tools if used properly. The same thing happened to me with my oldest- sent home with a nipple shield no one had even shown me how to put on! Ugh it drives me crazy. But if baby is apparently capable of latching without it, no need for a shield and best to avoid them. It is pretty unusual for a 7 week old who is gaining normally to be so sleepy at the breast. I wonder if baby is not nursing with much interest because baby is simply not hungry? To advise further, it would help to know how baby is gaining...
    1 replies | 94 view(s)
  • @llli*kirab's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:29 PM
    I'm in the same boat as you with my 6 month old. Since she was 4 months she has been waking every hour to two all night long, and will only settle back to sleep if I nurse her. It's been rough and I find myself constantly searching for a way to curb the wakings without a harsh method but have come to just accept that it's just a faze and someday I will forget how exhausted I was and miss the cuddles and how much she needed me. The last two nights she has given me a couple three hour stretches of sleep so fingers crossed this is the beginning of better sleep!
    7 replies | 526 view(s)
  • @llli*aranel's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:37 PM
    When my baby was born she had some breathing trouble and was on a Cpap for the first week of her life. Because of this I was unable to breast feed her and she got nipple confused. The hospital was -not- very helpful once I was discharged and didn't really help figure out how best help her nurse. They sent me home with a nipple shield and very little instruction. :cry At her first weigh in she hadn't gained enough weight I had total melt down at the doctors office. I had been trying to nurse her for hours at time with the nipple shield on and I had no idea she wasn't getting enough and passing out from exhaustion from trying. Her doctor told me to throw away the nipple shields and start pumping but keep offering her the breast... Shes 7 weeks old now and she will latch but she breaks suction and/or falls asleep very quickly at the breast. I hate pumping I am doing it every 2-3 hours round the clock and its killing me. I am scared to death to stop pumping because I worry she won't be getting enough milk. How do I safely transition her to the breast?
    1 replies | 94 view(s)
  • @llli*hhof0407's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:12 PM
    Also, I'm praying this is the culprit because this seems way more treatable than yeast. I have also been pumping and saving milk. I have not had the heart to throw it out even though I was told that due to my thrush diagnosis the milk should not be saved. Let's hope I can save my freezer stash for when I return to work!
    4 replies | 162 view(s)
  • @llli*hhof0407's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:06 PM
    The nipples do change color a little bit. Is it possible that one breast is worse than the other? Could it be possible that the trauma from the first few weeks of breastfeeding disaster is still causing the pain? He was really bad about creasing my nipples the first month or so. I had a line of scabs down the middle of the crease. The past few weeks they come out very minimally creased. I'm looking into this vasospasm a little more and using a heating pad right now to see if that helps.
    4 replies | 162 view(s)
  • @llli*peanutbutter7's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:06 PM
    Thanks, mommal. You are right that is exactly what has been going on. I am seeking support in all the wrong places, and trying to explain myself to people who aren't listening. It's sad but it is what it is. I'll definitely be using your response when asked about sleep. Last night was actually better, he isn't sleeping much longer stretches but he nursed back to sleep faster and was okay being put down again in his cosleeper (husband vetoed the bedsharing idea long ago, so a cosleeper was our compromise). I also tried offering the breast constantly in the evening, that may have helped too. Thanks for all the responses.
    10 replies | 236 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:40 AM
    :ita I would also want to take the "meet the need, the need goes away" approach. As MaddieB said, a lot of the resistance is in our heads, not the kid's head.
    2 replies | 176 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:38 AM
    :ita The foods that make adults gassy are not the ones that trouble babies, and babies are rarely troubled by gas, because it's normal for all babies. I think a lot of the idea that fussiness is caused by gas is simply due to the fact that infants are generally fussy and gassy- but that's correlation, not causality!
    7 replies | 314 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:35 AM
    Do you ever notice any of the following: - Nipples blanching (turning white, or bluish purple, before returning to a normal color) - Nipple appearing pinched/wedged/ridged/creased/asymmetrical/shaped like a new lipstick after baby comes off the breast?
    4 replies | 162 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:32 AM
    Hang in there, mama! I know it's particularly hard when you need sympathy from your friends/family and their response to "I haven't been getting much sleep" is "Here are the things you need to change in the way you parent in order to fix your life, and you'd better do them because what you are doing is wrong and will make things worse". I think that when you are in a situation in which your people aren't giving back what you need to hear, you do better if you tailor your message to them. What I mean is, don't waste your breath seeking support or sympathy or even empathy from people who can't or won't give it. Don't talk about sleep issues with hardcore sleep training advocates, because their only advice will be to start sleep training. Don't talk breastfeeding issues with people who think formula is the greatest, because all you will get from them is a recommendation to try some formula. If someone asks you about your baby's sleep, go with "Oh, he's sleeping well- for a baby. But you know what really interests me right now?" That way you can switch topics to something where your friends/family can give back, instead of needlessly hurting your feelings or undermining your convictions about how you want to parent. FTR, both my kids woke frequently at 4 months and I nursed them back to sleep every time. DD1 was a terrible sleeper until around 10 months, DD2 was much better- probably because I was a more relaxed mom and didn't care so much about wake-ups or...
    10 replies | 236 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    May 29th, 2016, 11:03 PM
    So you think the pain you are having is a reoccurrence of the thrush or something else? Do you have any symptoms of vasospasm? Since your baby was never treated, re-occurrence of thrush is quite likely. Also I am pretty sure that thrush causing nipple pain is much more common than the inner ductal pain you were having previous to treatment with the diflucan. So it would make sense for thrush to reoccur as nipple pain I would think. There are many other things to treat thrush in both you and baby. It is truly stupid that your pediatrician will not prescribe medication to threat thrush in your baby, truly, truly stupid and personally I would not trust a pediatrician who is that stupid. But if that is the way it is, what about gentian violet? You can get that easily as an otc treatment. Haven't your LCs mentioned that? I mean it is right in the Newman protocol how to do it and everything. He invented the APNO you have been using and even he says that if it is not working you have to try something else! Not too long ago gv was pretty much the only option for effective thrush treatment - no one was giving baby OR mom diflucan, unfortunately, back then, and gv cured many a case of thrush in mom and baby. Yes it is a pain to use and stains skin (temporarily) and clothing. But it really works, lots of the time. Some moms with ongoing nipple pain of undiagnosed cause report success after using coconut oil topically. I disagree with this. Entirely. Back pain...
    4 replies | 162 view(s)
  • @llli*hhof0407's Avatar
    May 29th, 2016, 07:06 PM
    I had ductal thrush and it was a burning pain that went all the way back to my shoulder blades and would linger for about an hour after nursing. I didn't know what was going on at the time and had similar thoughts as you; I thought about how natural childbirth was not a bad as that pain. Talk to your OB or Midwife and they can assess and treat you if that's the case. I would never have guessed that I needed to call my midwife for that since I didn't think that was their area, but luckily a lactation counselor I talked to suggested it.
    6 replies | 409 view(s)
  • @llli*hhof0407's Avatar
    May 29th, 2016, 06:54 PM
    My LO is 10 weeks now and we have had a rough start nursing to say the least. He wouldn't latch by the time we left the hospital, or well was barely latching with a shield. We stopped using the shield by the end of week one, but he still didn't latch well. After seeing a Lactation Counselor and a few pointers he did a little better but I was still in pretty serious pain. Turns out I had ductal thrush. I was put on diflucan for one month and that cleared the internal pain I was experiencing. I am still having pretty terrible nipple pain. My LO was never treated for thrush. The pediatrician said that since he showed no signs of thrush there was no need to treat. However the IBCLC and Lactation Counselor both wanted him treated, but unfortunately don't have that ability. I have also been using a prescribed all purpose nipple cream with a steroid, antifungal, and antibiotic in it I think. I have used that cream for about 1.5 months. I've been taking probiotics and doing a grapeseed extract rinse after every feeding. I have seen two different IBCLCs and a lactation counselor but they don't have any other suggestions for me. The don't believe that he is tongue tied and he has a good latch these days. I feel like the thrush is still there on the nipple, otherwise I feel crazy! My midwife said that the pain is just a learning curve, that the thrush is gone now since I don't have the shooting back pain. The pain feels like a raw scab being irritated. I also can feel my letdown...
    4 replies | 162 view(s)
  • @llli*peanutbutter7's Avatar
    May 29th, 2016, 04:40 PM
    Thanks. My husband hasn't been very involved in the baby's day to day care since the first 2 weeks. He also travels a lot. Our baby can't really be soothed by him nor anyone else. My mom watched him during my dr. appt last week and he cried the entire time. She has raised 4 kids, so I know she did her best to soothe but he was inconsolable until I picked him up. He must be experiencing separation anxiety early on top of Everythjng else. So I really can't leave him with anyone and expect to relax or sleep knowing he's suffering. But I plan to visit my mom more regularly in hopes that baby will grow to love/trust her. I'll just have to make it through somehow without much sleep.
    10 replies | 236 view(s)
  • @llli*jessiesmum's Avatar
    May 29th, 2016, 04:37 PM
    Don't apologise, we've all been there! First thing to do is go back to nursing on demand if you haven't already. it really is the fastest way to get baby back to sleep, and additionally the Oxytocin released during breastfeeding will help you get back to sleep more quickly after each waking. Following that I agree with all of Maddieb's suggestions outlined above. Any help you can get with housework etc will really go a long way to helping you relax. If someone can make you a sandwich or a salad that you can just grab for example, these are extra precious minutes saved, minutes which you can spend napping with the baby. If you aren't already bedsharing with baby then it is really worth considering making your sleep surface safe and reading up on safe practices. Maddie's reccommendation of Sweet Sleep is a brilliant book which would help you with bedsharing.
    10 replies | 236 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    May 29th, 2016, 04:26 PM
    When I would get super sleep deprived it really helped to put together one decent stretch of sleep. Not every night, just every few nights. 4- 6 hours would usually be enough to help me feel like a new woman for at least a couple days. How to do this when baby is waking hourly? Get help if you can! It actually is true that your baby does not NEED to eat that often. So if it will help you, have someone else care for baby so you can put together a longer sleep stretch. They probably will not even need to feed baby although that is ok too if it helps. Just know you are doing this for your sake - to get enough sleep to function- and not because it is somehow harming your baby to nurse baby to sleep. It isn't, I promise. Oh sorry posted before you finished... It has always flabbergasted me when people would be concerned that a baby might become "too attached" or "too needy" or "overly dependent!" I feel sorry for mothers who are made to feel this way about their babies. Of course a helpless baby is utterly and completely dependent on their mom. This is true no matter how the mother parents. Babies are babies and their needs do not change based on how they are parented. If you understand anything about normal human brain development, the last thing we need to be worrying about is TOO MUCH attachment. Is there any LLL or Attachment parenting group around you? Can you maybe look up parents who share your philosophy on meetup or yahoo groups? It really does help to...
    10 replies | 236 view(s)
  • @llli*peanutbutter7's Avatar
    May 29th, 2016, 04:25 PM
    Did it again! Anyway, from day one I felt good about nursing to sleep and I planned to do it always, but lately my mommy and me group has gotten their ideas (which I scoffed at at first) into my head. I am just so tired. I have had to defend my parenting choices and dodge questions about what I do (or don't do is more like it) from the beginning and I think I'm starting to lose confidence and wonder if they are right and I'll raise a needy, overly dependent child who will never do anything on his own. I am always being told by family and friends that my baby is too attached and after so much of this and not having anyone who parents the way I do to talk to, it got to me. I will do my best to continue following my baby's lead by feeding on demand and for comfort if need be.
    10 replies | 236 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    May 29th, 2016, 04:15 PM
    Gas is a normal byproduct of digestion and everyone has gas multiple times per day. Stomach sounds are also a normal part of digestion. Adults don't usually think about it or notice as we have lived with it forever. A newborn baby is trying out an entirely new digestive system and so gas is very new and sometimes upsetting. I honestly do not know if anything a mother might eat might make her baby gassy. People claim this all the time, but it actually makes little sense. It is not as if mom eating beans = baby eating beans. The baby is eating breastmilk, and species specific breastmilk is the only natural food for a mammalian infant. If it was so easy to make breastmilk somehow not pleasant or palatable with diet, humans and indeed all mammals would have died out long ago. Prehistoric humans populated most of the globe and so humans in particular have long eaten a very variable diet while being a very successful species. A very small minority of babies will react to certain food proteins that they get from mom's diet very indirectly via breastmilk. Usually dairy, which is interesting because of course dairy products are made from breastmilk- but the wrong kind for a human baby! But the reaction caused by a dairy protein allergy is NOT gas, or only gas, typically.
    7 replies | 314 view(s)
  • @llli*peanutbutter7's Avatar
    May 29th, 2016, 04:08 PM
    Sorry im pretty sleep deprived
    10 replies | 236 view(s)
  • @llli*peanutbutter7's Avatar
    May 29th, 2016, 04:03 PM
    Thank you for knocking some sense into me. I am so lost right now and desperate that
    10 replies | 236 view(s)
More Activity