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  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 08:06 PM
    No one is comfortable nursing in public...at first. Like anything else, it takes doing it over and over to get more comfortable with it. Also I am not sure what percentage of moms are comfortable with public nursing in all situations. A pretty small amount, I suspect. I always felt differently about it depending on where I was. In other words, no need to feel comfortable nursing in public to nurse in public. In my experience airplanes are actually one of the easier places to nurse in public. Most people on airplanes are trying in one way or another to put a bubble of privacy around themselves and return the favor to others. Also the way you are positioned makes your seatmate the person who is least likely to "see anything" unless they really try. And trust me, everyone around you will appreciate the (usually) more comfortable and thus, more quiet nursing baby over the baby who is screaming due to ear pain.
    4 replies | 128 view(s)
  • @llli*parakeet's Avatar
    Today, 07:51 PM
    I have a three week old who was born at 36.5 weeks, due date is in a couple of days. We have had to supplement but I got my supply up from herbs and pumping so now he is supplemented using EBM. He has a weak suck and is sleepy at the breast. I put him to my breast for 30-40 minutes and he will take approx 50% of his feed (I have rented a scale so I know), and the remaining 50% of his feed he will take via the bottle while I pump. His weight gain now is looking good. I have help to bottlefeed but I am getting fed up of pumping after every feed. Most of my 30-40 minutes at the breast is spent in breast compressions, tickling him, moving him from side to side to get him to wake up. In that 30-40 minutes, he might suck well for maybe 8-10 minutes, rest he is just sleepy. Is there an end to the supplementation and pumping? How long will it take? I'd rather just breastfeed than breastfeed + pump. Thanks!
    0 replies | 1 view(s)
  • @llli*zam.sc2017's Avatar
    Today, 05:50 PM
    I've been using the nipple shield since day one, I thought this was very helpful since her latch wasn't so great. Recently, I've been trying to wean her off of the shield because her latch has been improving but I feel like it's to late, I feel discouraged, disappointed and frustrated. I latch her on with the shield, 10 minutes later I pick her up to burp and try feeding her without the shield, at first she would latch on for 5 minutes and then fall asleep or simple latch off, I didn't try this daily, since I thought she was doing good but today she cried so loud, you can see her frustration she wanted to latch on but there was no shield, I tried and tried and tried but we were both frustrated, I gave in and I put on the shield and she latched on with no problem. She just turned 2 months, is it to late for me? Am I doing something wrong? Am I tramatizing her by letting her cry and basically forcing her on my boob when clearly she is not interested? How can I wean her off without feeling guilty? I would love to feed her without having to worry about a shield, it's a hassle (cleaning, sanitizing, remembering to pack, putting it on, taking it off) I don't feel comfortable going places because I know I'm going to have to put it on to feed her, I'm just getting to the point of giving up. Do you ladies have any tips? Should I just keep trying regardless if she cries?
    0 replies | 14 view(s)
  • @llli*zam.sc2017's Avatar
    Today, 05:44 PM
    I've been using the nipple shield since day one, I thought this was very helpful since her latch wasn't so great. Recently, I've been trying to wean her off of the shield because her latch has been improving but I feel like it's to late, I feel discouraged, disappointed and frustrated. I latch her on with the shield, 10 minutes later I pick her up to burp and try feeding her without the shield, at first she would latch on for 5 minutes and then fall asleep or simple latch off, I didn't try this daily, since I thought she was doing good but today she cried so loud, you can see her frustration she wanted to latch on but there was no shield, I tried and tried and tried but we were both frustrated, I gave in and I put on the shield and she latched on with no problem. She just turned 2 months, is it to late for me? Am I doing something wrong? Am I tramatizing her by letting her cry and basically forcing her on my boob when clearly she is not interested? How can I wean her off without feeling guilty? I would love to feed her without having to worry about a shield, it's a hassle (cleaning, sanitizing, remembering to pack, putting it on, taking it off) I don't feel comfortable going places because I know I'm going to have to put it on to feed her, I'm just getting to the point of giving up. Do you ladies have any tips? Should I just keep trying regardless if she cries?
    0 replies | 12 view(s)
  • @llli*carm3's Avatar
    Today, 04:55 PM
    Your doctor is not giving you very good advice! You should not have to wean because of thrush! There are many other things you can use to treat thrush. I encourage you to check out Dr. Newman's candida protocol http://ibconline.ca/information-sheets/candida-protocol/ and follow the steps. Gentian violet can be very effective for treating both mother and nursling. As for the diflucan, Dr. Newman has an information sheet on that as well, though he recommends trying the other measures in the protocol first. One dose of diflucan is enough for a vaginal yeast infection, but not for nipple thrush. Treatment should last at least a week after symptoms are gone, and for healthy moms it's considered fairly safe. There's also no reason why she shouldn't be feeding at night if that's an arrangement that's working well for you. Probably not even something you'd need to discuss with your baby's doctor! Best of luck!
    1 replies | 26 view(s)
  • @llli*sarahfv's Avatar
    Today, 04:14 PM
    Thank you guys- I'll pick up that book. I'm just anxious about all these changes, and looking ahead, because at 2 months I was thinking, "she has plenty of time to learn to take a bottle before I go back to work in a month," but nothing changed and she still hasn't improved much. I know waiting for me doesn't always mean she didn't have enough to eat, but she will start getting cranky/crying an hour or two before I get home and won't stop, so it seems like she must be hungry. No she can't sit independently. The sign I read was that she can hold up her head well when held in a sitting position. But I will wait. Yes nursing all summer seems like the easiest thing to do, but will also be a hassle if she still wants to nurse every hour. I'm not comfortable bf in public, so I have to be able to find a private spot wherever I am.. every hour. Traveling will be especially hard- I will be taking at least 2 flights this summer with her (to visit family) that will be 6-8 hours. So I'll have to nurse 5-6 times right next to a stranger or in the plane's bathroom. But you're right, I shouldn't worry about it right now and I don't want her to wean early.
    4 replies | 128 view(s)
  • @llli*beautybecomes's Avatar
    Today, 02:18 PM
    Hello everyone... I'm currently nursing my 18 month old daughter. We have battled thrush repeatedly in our nursing relationship. The DOC has given her nystatin and Daktrin gel. Numerous times. I've insisted as the nursing mother... I should be treated with diflucan, which he prescribed one dose. After the last treatment her thrush went away for a month and has come back. Now the DOC has said well at this point you should wean her bc nothing else can be done to stop the thrush. I'm very stressed over it as she has a strong emotional attachment to nursing, and she is a terrible eater. I'd say most of her nutrition comes from me. The comment has also been made that she shouldn't be getting any night feeds at her age.(we breastfed on demand and co sleep) Any advice to save our nursing relationship???
    1 replies | 26 view(s)
  • @llli*ferrit82's Avatar
    Today, 01:40 PM
    Hi everyone, i am exclusively breastfeeding my 5 month old and have recently noticed that she is asking more often in the night. When I give her the last feed before bed I usually nurse on both sides and then put her to bed. Tonight I thought I'd try re-attaching again before putting her down to see if she's feed more. She latched on and became very fussy like she was trying to get the let down started but it just wasn't happening. I had expressed some milk earlier in the day so I thought I'd see if she took the expressed milk. She took an extra 40ml at this point. My question is, could it be possible that my breasts do not produce enough to make her full at night? Thanks
    0 replies | 36 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 10:05 AM
    Hi. Just to be clear, your baby is now 6 months old, correct? You say 6 week checkup but I know from your history baby is older than that! If baby is 6 months old, I am not sure what the concern is. "Drops" in percentile as well as "jumps" in percentile for both weight and height growth are common and usually entirely normal. Did your pediatrician express concern about your baby's gain? It would help to know how often overall baby nurses. A 6 month old baby is (hopefully) still getting all of their nutrition from breastmilk, even if the introduction to solids has begun. So most 6 month olds will still nurse (or have a bottle) 8-12 times in 24 hours. Since most foods do not contain as much fat and calories as breastmilk, it is probably not a good idea to encourage more of these in order to increase weight gain. Because what actually happens in that case is a baby fills up on the solids and not nurse as much, or not nurse as productively, or not take as much in the bottle, exacerbating slow gain rather than fixing the problem. If the problem really is low milk production, then high fat, high cal foods might make sense. But nothing is as nutritionally complete as breastmilk, and I do not think it is at all clear that there is anything wrong with your milk production. However if baby nurses less due to being fed solids more, that will eventually harm production. This is why the intro to solids is considered a dangerous time for milk production. expressing 3...
    1 replies | 36 view(s)
  • @llli*bfulmer's Avatar
    Today, 09:40 AM
    My LO is just over 6 months and up until last week I wasn't working not was she taking a bottle, so I was breastfeeding exclusively. I did pump every so often and have had a few clogged ducts and a small case of mastitis, so I do have a descent freezer stash (20+ 3-4 oz bags). Now that I'm back to work Dad has been giving her a sippy cup after 3 hours to which she only drinks about 1.5 oz. He then brings her to me 3.5 hours later to breastfeed before bed. We had her 6 week checkup on Monday and she dropped from the 25th percentile to the 15th. I've only been back to work for a week so obviously this lack of weight increase isn't because of our new schedule. I am, however, concerned now with her being apart from me that her weight may continue to struggle. I continue to feed on demand and keep it to 3 hours and no more if I can help it (if she's napping I won't wake her). She's getting more cereal and solids to help with the weight. I'm mostly concerned with my pumping. I feel like it's very inconsistent and the only time I get a descent amount is if I go 5-6 hours. When I pump at work it's usually around 4-5 hours from the last breastfeeding and I'll get 1.5 ounces on each side. That doesn't seem like a lot to me at all. Does this mean that's all my LO is getting when she eats? Could this be the issue of her weight gain problems? Am I not producing enough for her? I eat lactation smoothies almost every day and whenever LO is done eating if I squeeze my breast milk comes...
    1 replies | 36 view(s)
  • @llli*mum.mumbai's Avatar
    Today, 06:57 AM
    Hi all, From couple of weeks whenever my son nurses, I expirence a very strong aversion to it. I feel maybe it is my supply dipping or his latch altering, that is making my skin crawl, also want to run away from him. This used to happen sporadically when I was PMSing, now have become a regular thing. This is worst at.bedtime feeds when he switched sides for 100 times before finally conking off. Sometimes he comes away saying milk is over and I have to.rock.him to sleep. My.super busy day and really long winding bedtime does not gel well.leaving me very irritable, which normally am not. Morning feeds r worst as.he refuses to.unlatch. I have tried setting limits, boundaries by counting, singing which absolutely don't work. I wish there were more pleasant and amicable ways to end his nursing sessions,but am at loss to find them. I have always wanted him.to self wean. But this unpleasantness is not healthy for me or him. I wish he learns to sleep and get up without milk.Can you give me strategies to make this work??
    0 replies | 38 view(s)
  • @llli*mum.mumbai's Avatar
    Today, 06:49 AM
    Hi all, From couple of weeks whenever my son nurses, I expirence a very strong aversion to it. I feel maybe it is my supply dipping or his latch altering, that is making my skin crawl, also want to run away from him. This used to happen sporadically when I was PMSing, now have become a regular thing. This is worst at.bedtime feeds when he switched sides for 100 times before finally conking off. Sometimes he comes away saying milk is over and I have to.rock.him to sleep. My.super busy day and really long winding bedtime does not gel well.leaving me very irritable, which normally am not. Morning feeds r worst as.he refuses to.unlatch. I have tried setting limits, boundaries by counting, singing which absolutely don't work. I wish there were more pleasant and amicable ways to end his nursing sessions,but am at loss to find them. I have always wanted him.to self wean. But this unpleasantness is not healthy for me or him. I wish he learns to sleep and get up without milk.Can you give me strategies to make this work??
    0 replies | 35 view(s)
  • @llli*cerrajero02's Avatar
    Today, 06:38 AM
    Thanks for your article.
    4 replies | 5328 view(s)
  • @llli*gilismom's Avatar
    Today, 03:40 AM
    Thanks for responding! Today i used the 30mm and it wasn't painful and no red ring. Maybe bec I put coconut oil on. Is that normal to have to do that? I think the red ring is from friction when it happens; i never have the suction on high enough to cause a ring int hat way, since i'm very sensitive to over-suctioning! I never go above 4 on the Medela. So the point is; don't angst about whether too much areola is going in the tube, and just think about how I feel? I wish I could post a photo or video so you could evaluate.... IN any case thanks so much for the advice!
    2 replies | 135 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:15 PM
    So baby is now, 4 months old, and in a couple months, you will be home for a couple months and can nurse your baby instead of pumping/bottles, and then she will not be going to daycare until she is about 9 months old? If I have the timeline right, I guess I am not understanding how starting solids "early" will help? I agree with djsmom. If you want to use real foods, not pureed, very liquidy baby foods, wait a bit to get to the time babies are typically ready for the introduction of solids, which is usually around 6 months old but may be considerably later for some babies. Also be prepared for your child to not take in anything significant as far as solids for many months. How much a child will eat as far as solids varies tremendously, and it is unpredictable. In any case, the recommendation is that a child's primary nutrition for the first year is breastmilk or formula. Primary in this case means approaching 100%, not a simple majority. Of course again, this will vary baby to baby. I also liked the baby led solids book, (called baby led weaning) I did not read it until our third baby and solid introduction certainly went smoothest with her. Another very good book that takes a fascinating look at the overall subject of food intake, growth and health in babies and young children is My Child Won't Eat. Here is a pretty good article about readiness. I will also say, my middle child had all the readiness signs before 6 months, and even so, and even though we...
    4 replies | 128 view(s)
  • @llli*djs.mom's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:43 PM
    Your 4 month old can sit unassisted? Because that is one of the KEY signs of readiness. And there is a book about Baby Led solids. Which is a method that feeds only whole real foods. But I would NOT try to up the timeline on when you start feeding your EBF baby solids. 4month olds for the most part are NOT ready and just because she waits for you doesn't mean she isn't getting enough to eat.
    4 replies | 128 view(s)
  • @llli*sarahfv's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:58 AM
    Hi all. My 4 month old is a snacker- she nurses every 1-2 hours during the day. She will empty one side in 5 minutes and be done. She is also a bottle hater and has given my stay at home husband a hard time for the last 6 weeks I've been back at work. We will both be off work for the summer but starting in September baby will go to daycare with a stay-at-home mom. I want that to go as smoothly as possible, so I have some questions about starting solids.. Should we start earlier than the recommended 6 months since we've had these issues and baby isn't getting enough to eat when I'm working? She displays all the readiness signs. Do you have a recommended book for introducing solids? We'd like to use real foods, not the baby food in jars.
    4 replies | 128 view(s)
  • @llli*sarahfv's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:45 AM
    I went through the same thing and have been back at work for 6 weeks now (baby is 19 weeks). Dad stays home with her and sometimes she will take the bottle no problem and still sometimes she will reject it and cry until I return home. She will never take more than 1-2 oz at a time. Some days she's happy all day and others are miserable. Remember when you leave her at 4 month it will be only 2 months until she can start solids and that will take some of the burden off. Perhaps she will be ready for a soppy cup too and prefer that. Some things that helped us- she prefers the Bare bottle brand with the shorter nipple that you have to work to get milk out of, and it can be held at any angle. So she doesn't choke. Then my husband has to have her propped in a boppy- bottle in one hand and shaking a distracting toy in the other. Good luck!
    4 replies | 349 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:45 AM
    If there is a supply issue, then the way you solve it is to remove more milk more often. The way you do this is: 1. Nurse the baby more frequently, aiming to use the tricks for waking a sleepy baby as consistently as possible. 2. Pump in addition to nursing, using a high-quality pump with properly sized shields. 3. See a lactation consultant, preferably an IBCLC, for in-person help.
    9 replies | 342 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:41 AM
    :ita A baby who is still hungry is going to fuss or cry for more food. A baby who wants to be held, or played with, or taken on a walk- that baby is going to look around, and act interested in her surroundings. Does the baby take a pacifier? Maybe that would be something to suggest to her caregivers. It's often an easy sell because daycare providers are generally more experienced with babies who take pacifiers than babies who are breastfed.
    4 replies | 201 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:38 AM
    I think the thing to do here is to try the larger flange and the smaller flange again, and see what happens. And when you do, focus on what you're feeling rather than what you're seeing. Sensation is far more relevant to whether or not the flange fit is good than what you see when you pump, or what you see in a video! That being said, a red ring at the end of a pump session is certainly an observation you should take seriously! Is it more like a ring cause by suction, or one caused by friction?
    2 replies | 135 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:34 AM
    :ita with MaddieB! The faster milk is taken out, the faster milk is made to replace what has been removed. So it's possible that a mom would continue to get droplets out forever while pumping, because the breast is always making more milk
    3 replies | 106 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    March 21st, 2017, 07:12 PM
    Hi asim1617. It would help to know who told you to pump "to the last drop" and why. Many moms are routinely told they have to be sure baby empties the breasts, or that they have to pump to the last drop. But in actual practice, this is neither necessary nor possible for many mothers. The breasts are always making milk and every mom responds differently to pumping, so some moms could pump for a very long time and still get some drops. This advice to empty the breasts possibly comes from a time when mothers and babies were routinely put on feeding schedules of (something like) 15 minutes a side every 3-4 hours, and these feeding schedules killed milk production. Of course what is really best for milk production is to make sure baby nurses frequently for as long as they want, and/or mom pumps frequently and with effective milk removal. If you are pumping because you need to increase your milk production, then yes you want to get the breast feeling as empty as possible when you pump. But that does not mean you have to pump until there is absolutely nothing coming out, as again, that might not be possible in a reasonable time and also, frequency of milk removal is just as important. If you are having issues with low milk production, let us know the details and perhaps we will have some ideas or resources to point you to.
    3 replies | 106 view(s)
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