Happy Mothers Breastfed Babies

Activity Stream

Filter
Sort By Time Show
Recent Recent Popular Popular Anytime Anytime Last 7 Days Last 7 Days Last 30 Days Last 30 Days All All Photos Photos Forum Forums
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 12:20 PM
    I agree with djs.mom.There are lots of myths out their about infant feeding, in particular when a child is breastfed. What you have been told are things that mothers of full term babies with perfectly normal gain and no diagnosed feeding issues are also (erroneously) told, over and over. In other words I wonder if this is specialized advice at all, as it sounds boilerplate- and incorrect. Huh? I would love to know what research this is based on. Did she provide any? I am pretty sure weight gain depends on total calories in vs. total calories expended. If all it took to lose weight was to eat more often, why do we have an obesity crisis in this country? You are right, nurse is wrong. My children this age (and by this age I mean well into toddlerhood) nursed several times overnight and there was never any concern about their gain. Or their sleep. Because both were normal. I am with your mom and sis. It sounds like your child's appetite is fine. Obviously your child being premature and having low muscle tone, and perhaps needing feeding therapy perhaps complicates the issues, but not so much you should be worrying yourself about advice that flies in the face of common sense. If there is any question about weight gain, obviously doing anything to reduce how often you child eats makes no sense! Premature or not, an 8 month old OR an 11 month old child either has normal appetite signals or they do not. If they do not, (and this would be very unusual but it...
    2 replies | 41 view(s)
  • @llli*djs.mom's Avatar
    Today, 10:33 AM
    I would relax. I had a bigger baby who wasn't a preemie. But he still from the 90th percentile down to the 75percentile at 6months. Specifically BECAUSE he started moving. So he went from gaining 14oz a week. Which he did right up until 4.5 months old when he started to roll, to 3.5oz a week. And then between 6&9months? Almost nothing. By 4.5 months? He weighed 17.5 lbs. By 9months? Only 19.5lbs. By a year? 21. He started walking at 10 months. And he ate thru the night until I nightweaned him at 3. But he FOR SURE woke up that whole 1st year because between 6months and year he was teething almost constantly so he nursed for pain comfort all the time. I wouldn't worry and would NOT stop feeding him on demand. Breastmilk is higher in calories than any solids you are going to feed him. But to that end? I would always make sure the solids you feed him are high in fat. Which is hard because what is there beside advacado for babies that they can eat that high in fat. Well cheese, and yogurt and I would fry his veggies in coconut oil as well.
    2 replies | 41 view(s)
  • @llli*pixiemama's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:34 PM
    Cross posted in the Breastfeeding Preemies forum. "Adjusted age" refers to how old he would be if he hadn't been premature, and it is what the docs use to measure his growth and development until age 2. I am exclusively breastfeeding my 26 weeker. He is 11 months now, but 8 months adjusted. We were supplementing until 2 months adjusted, but got the greenlight to exclusively breastfeed at 2 months adjusted. He has always been in the 35th percentile for height (adjusted age), but only the 10th percentile for weight (adjusted age) ever since we stopped supplementing. I'm going by the WHO guidelines, so it takes the breastfeeding babies into account, from what I understand. My very supportive mother keeps reminding me that I was always in the 10th percentile for weight, too, and I wasn't a preemie. My doctor kept wanting to supplement, but I followed my instincts and told her that I was always in the 10th percentile, so I really didn't see reason for concern. Plus, he is in the 35th for height, and growing consistently on both curves, and meeting or exceeding all milestones. We started solids 2 months ago, and it turns out he is going to have to get feeding therapy. His muscle tone is a little low, so they are concerned he isn't using his tongue correctly when eating solids. Right now, he only gets solids twice a day and then he breastfeeds after. I'm starting to get a lot of conflicting info from various healthcare workers as to how much he should eat and how often...
    2 replies | 41 view(s)
  • @llli*pixiemama's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:28 PM
    I am exclusively breastfeeding my 26 weeker. He is 11 months now, but 8 months adjusted. We were supplementing until 2 months adjusted, but got the greenlight to exclusively breastfeed at 2 months adjusted. He has always been in the 35th percentile for height (adjusted age), but only the 10th percentile for weight (adjusted age) ever since we stopped supplementing. I'm going by the WHO guidelines, so it takes the breastfeeding babies into account, from what I understand. My very supportive mother keeps reminding me that I was always in the 10th percentile for weight, too, and I wasn't a preemie. My doctor kept wanting to supplement, but I followed my instincts and told her that I was always in the 10th percentile, so I really didn't see reason for concern. Plus, he is in the 35th for height, and growing consistently on both curves, and meeting or exceeding all milestones. We started solids 2 months ago, and it turns out he is going to have to get feeding therapy. His muscle tone is a little low, so they are concerned he isn't using his tongue correctly when eating solids. Right now, he only gets solids twice a day and then he breastfeeds after. I'm starting to get a lot of conflicting info from various healthcare workers as to how much he should eat and how often and it's making me really anxious! Plus he seems to have dropped on the weight scale a bit (down to 6th percentile for adjusted age, but still at 35th for height) in the last 2 weeks. The nurse that came to...
    0 replies | 26 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:51 PM
    In my experience the needle think is painless or nearly so. The bleb is like a callous- the skin is relatively thick and dead and not very tender unless you probe too far with the needle. Keep doing the salt water soaks and try putting a cotton ball soaked in olive oil over the bleb, inside your bra. You probably also want to try picking at the spot with your fingernails (freshly washed, obviously!) or trying to squeeze out anything that might be blocking the white area. But if you find that no milk is coming out of that white spot, I wouldn't be afraid to try the needle. It's really not that bad!
    3 replies | 230 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:47 PM
    Fingers crossed that the daycare has an opening! You might also want to look into a temporary nanny... But you probably already thought of that, and it's probably going to be even more expensive than shipping milk home. Anyway, you asked about the downsides of mixed feeding. Formula has the same amount of calories as breastmilk, but it lacks the immunological support factors that breastmilk has. The primarily downside to formula is that your baby is getting less breastmilk. Formula can also cause issues with constipation, so you would want baby's caregivers to be alert to that possibility. If you do decide to use formula, it's very important to mix it according to the directions on the can. That means using water, not breastmilk, to mix with the powder. Once the formula is prepared, you can mix it with breastmilk, but you probably don't want to unless baby refuses to drink straight formula. The storage guidelines for formula and breastmilk are quite different. An unfinished bottle of formula needs to get dumped after 1 hour. Unfinished breastmilk bottles can be returned to the fridge and used at the next feeding. So ideally, you give the baby a bottle of straight breastmilk and then top her off with straight formula. That way, if she doesn't finish a bottle, it's only formula going down the sink.
    5 replies | 227 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    February 23rd, 2017, 03:08 PM
    Nursing 12 times a day or even a little more is within the range of normal. I am pretty sure all my kids nursed at least that often at this age, and I had no problems with low milk production. When you say baby sleeps through the night, how long is that usually? Are you pumping at night because you are feeling full, or to have expressed milk for a stash, or because you are concerned about milk production or some other reason? Has baby's gain been normal? Again that would be the most accurate measure to tell if something is wrong or not. Breast compressions may help with this. But it might be baby is getting all she wants from the one letdown. Search Jack Newman Breast Compressions for a good article on how and why to try these.
    3 replies | 178 view(s)
  • @llli*macymichelle's Avatar
    February 23rd, 2017, 02:10 PM
    Thanks for responding! She is eating pretty much every hour or hour and a half during the day. She sleeps through the night. I would say she eats about 12 times, plus a "snack" here and there. I usually pump once in the morning, and one long session at night. Some days I pump maybe once more in the morning after I feed her. I usually only get an ounce at a time. She doesn't eat for very long is the only thing I could think of. She nurses until I get a let down then when it slows down she gets agitated and latches and unlatches.
    3 replies | 178 view(s)
  • @llli*bfulmer's Avatar
    February 23rd, 2017, 11:40 AM
    I'd like in on this convo since I'm having the same issue! I had a pretty severe plugged duct a few weeks back and was able to massage it out. However, I noticed this white spot on the nipple (been having nipple pain for weeks now). I'm on antibiotics for mastitis (called the nurse last week) and I soak it in saline solution every night for a few minutes. Just this morning I looked up the white spot. It's been there for awhile but I didn't think it was related. Now I'm realizing it's probably a bleb. Wondering what measures I can take to work that out. Should I continue to soak and try the needle thing? God that sounds so awful... Thanks in advance!
    3 replies | 230 view(s)
  • @llli*bfulmer's Avatar
    February 23rd, 2017, 11:28 AM
    You are very welcome, thank you :) Yes... that is a lot of milk. I have a bit of storage right now just in case. Even though she hasn't taken a bottle since month 2... There is a SLIGHT chance I may be able to take her with. Finding a caregiver would be pretty difficult. I would have to check the on base daycare although they're typically very full and it takes awhile to get in. Shipping milk would be pretty expensive... What are the downfalls to using a mix of formula and breast milk?
    5 replies | 227 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    February 22nd, 2017, 06:34 PM
    Hi and welcome! Is your baby gaining weight normally? Since nursing behavior can normally vary a great deal, the most accurate measure of whether or not baby is getting enough to eat is weight gain. When you say baby is eating every hour, do you mean day and night? Or is there a longer stretch of time that she sleeps here and there? How many times total in 24 hours would you say baby nurses? How many times a day do you pump and about how much do you get each time you pump? What kind of a pump is it? If baby is not able to get enough milk, one reason might be low production, but another is that baby is not nursing efficiently. Have you ever had breastfeeding assessed by a board certified lactation consultant (IBCLC)? Thanks
    3 replies | 178 view(s)
  • @llli*macymichelle's Avatar
    February 22nd, 2017, 03:27 PM
    My 3 month old has been a good nurser from the start. Typically she has always eaten every 2-2.5 hours. For the last month, she has been wanting to nurse every hour, and never really seems satisfied. I have been pumping in between feedings, taking supplements. I feel like I am trying everything, but she just seems fussy and agitated a lot of the time. I am worried that I am having a hard time keeping up with her. I would just like some advice on how to proceed from here, just power through or supplement?
    3 replies | 178 view(s)
  • @llli*tasha's Avatar
    February 22nd, 2017, 02:33 PM
    Thanks.* I'll try anything and yes I give ejr vitamin d during the winter.* We just got back from the dentists and we're told that this "spoilt" nursing must stop immediately and that we should be giving her cows milk. Then according the dentist she'll need fluoride varnish and eventually one of her front teeth pulled under a general anastheic.* I'm devestated, it went much worse than I expected.* I thought she may need a cap and to stop night nursing.* On top of this my husband and his family who have never supported me nursing for so long finally have their opportunity to critisize.** I would do anything for my little girl and this is awful.
    9 replies | 297 view(s)
  • @llli*laylas.momma's Avatar
    February 22nd, 2017, 11:28 AM
    Glad to hear it's normal...I'm constantly worried she's not getting enough milk. We had seen a lactation consultant early on (week 2) but I think another visit will be helpful. Thanks again for your quick and helpful responses!
    7 replies | 307 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    February 22nd, 2017, 11:10 AM
    Great news!
    9 replies | 314 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    February 22nd, 2017, 11:07 AM
    Great news doctor is happy with your baby's gain. This indicates as well that doctor is seeing an overall healthy baby he or she is not too worried about, and that is important too! So 2/16 baby weighed 8 lbs 15 and 5 days later on 2/21 baby had gained 5 ounces? So that would certainly indicate normal gain of an average 1 ounce a day over the last 5 days. I am a little concerned because getting an accurate picture from gain measured over a few days is hard. Overall gain is still slightly on the slow side. But your baby's behavior at the breast sounds entirely normal for this age. I am not sure why your baby is tugging, there are a few things you could try for this, including positioning changes and breast compressions. But fussing, long nursing sessions, frequent nursing sessions, wanting to nurse less than an hour after nursing really are all entirely normal and occur in fast gaining babies as well as slower gaining babies. Babies nurse for many reasons, hunger is only one reason. Nursing for comfort is just as important- in fact they are the same thing to an infant. Additionally of course a baby this age really is frequently very hungry and wants to nurse a great deal because baby is still gaining as rapidly as baby did the last several weeks in the womb when baby was fed constantly. I did not realize you are already under the care of an IBCLC. If you like her and think she is helpful, I do think it makes sense to see your IBCLC again, more for the gain...
    7 replies | 307 view(s)
  • @llli*laylas.momma's Avatar
    February 22nd, 2017, 07:54 AM
    Thank you for all of this! Not currently on birth control. We had a doc appt yesterday and she's up to 9lbs 4oz and doc feels this is good gain and doesn't think we need to supplement yet. However, I'm still concerned with the frequency of feeding and the tugging indication something is wrong. For example, this morning she was on the breast from 6:30-8:00. She ate well on the both breasts for about 15 mins and three fussed when I took her off, crying and acting as if she was still hungry (sucking in hands) put her back on and she got some milk and then resorted to the tugging and fussing. By 8:00 I was able to take her off and she moderately content until 8:40 and then wanted to eat again. It feels like the only time she's calm is on the breast or if she falls asleep on the breast and I'm able to break her off without waking her. This behavior had been going on for about two weeks. The weight gain is a relief but it seems problematic to me that she has to be in the breast this often to get there. I'm going to make another appt with our lactation consultant but would love any other thoughts you might have.
    7 replies | 307 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    February 22nd, 2017, 07:24 AM
    Babies under a year typically drink about 1.5 oz per hour of separation from mom. Daily total intake is typically around 20-30 oz. With an older baby who is eating solids, this amount often decreases a bit. But in your shoes, I think I would want to aim to have about 20-25 oz per day of separation. It's a lot of milk to produce and store by mid-May, especially if you're going to be using some of your expressed milk to train baby to take a bottle. Any chance of bringing baby and a caregiver with you on your trip? How about shipping milk back home- is that a possibility for you? Thank you for your service!
    5 replies | 227 view(s)
  • @llli*allirawlins's Avatar
    February 22nd, 2017, 07:21 AM
    Thanks for the book recommendations! I will definitely be checking both books out! Yesterday went better for both eating and sleeping! She ate 2oz from the bottle in one sitting and had 1oz of milk in her cereal and puree and had another whole oz from the bottle so she definitely got more milk than she has been getting during the day and not completely refusing the bottle like she has done most recently. She slept for 4 hours, woke to eat, and went right back to sleep for another 4 hours! Hopefully this is a start to better eating and sleeping! Thank you for all of your help! :)
    9 replies | 314 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    February 22nd, 2017, 07:18 AM
    What sort of scale are you using? And can you describe your baby-weighing procedure? Is baby always weighed in the nude?
    2 replies | 189 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    February 22nd, 2017, 07:15 AM
    Nothing to add to MaddieB's excellent advice, but I do have a question: what sort of birth control are you using? Sometimes hormonal contraception, even the "safe for breastfeeding" formulations, can interfere with milk supply. If you are trying to eliminate variables that might explain supply issues, it might make sense to temporarily switch to a barrier contraceptive if you are currently using a hormonal one.
    7 replies | 307 view(s)
More Activity