Happy Mothers Breastfed Babies

Activity Stream

Filter
Sort By Time Show
Recent Recent Popular Popular Anytime Anytime Last 7 Days Last 7 Days Last 30 Days Last 30 Days All All Photos Photos Forum Forums
  • @llli*minka's Avatar
    Today, 07:32 AM
    Thank you so much for all this information. If I begin pumping more frequently but for less time, in the future when my little one's need for milk increases, will my supply be responsive to this? That's been one of my concerns. I'd really like to steer clear of the need to supplement with formula if it's at all possible. Our little one has had issues latching from day one. She has a slight tongue tie but the ent we went to said that it most likely would not make a difference to have it released and our pediatrician agreed. They assured us that her range of motion of her tongue will not limit her speech wise or in any other way and the only reason to have it released would be the possible improvement in breast-feeding which could not be guaranteed, so my husband and I decided not to put her through the procedure at this time. (Although we understand that it is a simple, straightforward one.)
    2 replies | 13 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 06:56 AM
    Welcome to the forum and congratulations on the new baby and on making it through the first 3 weeks of breastfeeding! It sounds like you are making quite a lot of milk, which is absolutely typical for a mom who is just 3 weeks in; milk production often peaks in the 3-6 week window. If I were in your shoes, here is what I would do: 1. Pump or hand express a little more often. Babies generally nurse a minimum of 8x per day, and most 3 week olds are nursing more like 10-12 or more times per day. Removing milk a little more often would be a little more like the natural pattern of breastfeeding and would decrease your risk for things like plugged ducts, mastitis, feelings of engoregement/overfull breasts. 2. Pump or hand express less milk at each session. Instead of pumping until you feel completely empty, take 2-4 oz and then stop. If you end the day a few oz in advance of your child's average daily needs, fine. It's not that much milk to store, right? And if you are a few oz behind, still okay- you have plenty in storage to make up for the shortfall and you can pump a little more the next day. 3. Invest in a standalone chest freezer. If you plan to exclusively pump, it might be a good idea to create a larger frozen stash than you would have if you were nursing and just providing milk for daycare or sitters. This way you will have a cushion for pump slumps and busy days. Milk also lasts longer in a standalone freezer than in the freezer compartment of your...
    2 replies | 13 view(s)
  • @llli*minka's Avatar
    Today, 06:30 AM
    Hello. I am seeking advice regarding oversupply and storing breast milk options. My little on is 3 weeks old and for latching reasons, we have decided to exclusively bottle feed her breast milk. I am currently pumping 7 times a day, at 3-ish hour intervals which yields about 40 oz a day. She consumes less than half of this, which leaves me with a massive inventory of breastmilk that is taking over the fridge and freezer. Since I am exclusively pumping I want to be able to meet her feeding needs when she gets older, but the output at the end of the day seems quite excessive. Any advice?
    2 replies | 13 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    6 replies | 393 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 05:36 AM
    I think the best thing you can do is to take a deep breath and have faith that the nursery workers will find a way to get your child to take a nap. This is almost always what happens! Babies don't get why mom won't just nurse them to sleep, so when mom is there, they will kick up a huge fuss in order to get mom to deliver their favorite form of comfort. But when mom's not there, most babies don't expect anything other than cuddles. I think that if you don't want to be trapped in an hour-long PUPD battle with your LO, your choices are either to let dad take over all the nighttime comforting, or to completely reverse course and nurse him when he wants, maybe try co-sleeping (which doesn't necessarily mean bed sharing, it can also mean sleeping next to your baby in a separate bed), and have confidence that "if you meet the need, the need will go away". Maybe not as soon as you wish, but eventually!
    1 replies | 26 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 05:26 AM
    Does it help to hear that I would have committed crimes- misdemeanors for sure, felonies maybe!- for a kid who woke up just 3 times a night at 7 months? My kids were up 5-8 times at that age. :eye
    3 replies | 96 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 05:23 AM
    She might change her mind. But go easy on her- the last thing any mom needs is pressure on the subject of breastfeeding. If she does change her mind, I suggest celebrating her in every way possible. If she doesn't... Just keep your silence, right? You're absolutely right that there is no way to know if herbs and pumping will be enough to make you lactate, or how long you should wait before you declare the experiment a success or failure. Unfortunately, this is one area where responses to pumping and herbs and drugs are so incredibly variable that there's just no way to give people a good answer! What sort of pump do you have?
    3 replies | 145 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 05:19 AM
    :its with the PP.
    2 replies | 71 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 05:16 AM
    It's absolutely not true that a baby's latch can't be corrected "because the baby is too old". Most babies eventually outgrow their latch problems, because they get bigger and a bigger mouth is better at getting a deep latch, and because they become stronger, more coordinated, and more skillful at nursing. Babies have a deep motivation to get nursing right, so most of them do if you give them enough time. If this is my baby, I think I would go back to doing some expressing. Due to the compression you experience when the baby nurses, my guess is that he's having trouble achieving a deep latch, and that can result in lower milk transfer and lower supply. When this is the case, pumping can make up for some of what the baby is not yet able to do, in terms of maintaining supply. Pumping can also give your sore nipples a much-needed break! The problem with pumping, of course, is that it can be labor-intensive and time-consuming. But it sounds to me like your baby still needs some help in maintaining your supply, and the pump is one way to do that. Please don't let this get you down! I completely understand why you are feeling depressed. But you are doing an amazing job. There are moms who have very easy breastfeeding journeys and yet they complain about them all the time and switch to formula just because they feel like it. You are having a difficult journey and you are working so much harder than the average mom. It's something to be very proud of!
    8 replies | 223 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 04:59 AM
    When you have mastitis, my understanding is that you want to remove as much milk as possible as often as possible from the infected breast regardless of how old the baby is or what keeping your milk supply high does to your weaning goals. Think of it as an infection-control measure, no more. If you want, you can stick to your plan of removing milk just once a day on the uninflected breast. For the record, most of the antibiotics prescribed for mastitis are completely safe for nursing. So if you want to continue to nurse through the course of antibiotics, you almost surely can. If you have questions about medication safety, I suggest calling Infant Risk, http://www.infantrisk.com
    1 replies | 20 view(s)
  • @llli*helbk's Avatar
    Today, 04:08 AM
    I have enjoyed breastfeeding my baby boy since he was born, and hope to continue BF once in the morning and evening when I return to work in a month's time. He currently sleeps well (7.30am-5am, after husband consistently saw to him during the night) and once down for naps in his cot he can sleep for over an hour, though not always! My challenge is he will only settle if I nurse him to sleep. This can take quite a long time (sometimes over an hour), particularly during the day, with him wailing every time I stand up to put him in his cot. Though initially upset, my husband is able to get him to sleep in about 10-20mins at night with cuddles and singing, then sitting with him next to the cot. It means that no one else is able to put him down for naps/night which is really constraining, but also concerning for when he starts nursery. My husband is the only one who can go into him to settle him if we wakes at night, as I'd just be trapped in the BF cycle for an hour if I go in. I would like to be able to comfort him too! In the past we did some sleep training using PUPD/Shh/pat due to him waking every hour, and this worked well. Typically this slipped when he became ill and was teething so I've been nursing him to sleep for quite a few months now but it's becoming less and less effective. I've read so many sleep training approaches, the gentle ones such as the Pantley method, to gradual withdrawal, but I just don't know what would be better for an older baby who does...
    1 replies | 26 view(s)
  • @llli*rainbowgoblin's Avatar
    Today, 03:24 AM
    I have a 15-month-old who I've been nursing mornings and some evenings. I haven't actively been trying to wean, but I skip evening feeds if he's more interested in playing. This has been our routine for a few weeks without incident, until yesterday, when I developed mastitis (I've had mastitis a few times, so I seem to just be prone to it, and I had an injured nipple from distracted feeding, and my kids are in daycare, so we get a lot of viruses, hence weakened immune system). Anyway, I hadn't planned to wean before 18 to 24 months, but now I'm thinking I should do it now. I don't want to nurse while I'm taking antibiotics (7 days). The alternative is to express enough to keep my supply up for the next week, which seems like more trouble than it's worth (I work full time, and at the moment pumping is very painful). The advice I've read on weaning says that it's OK to express just enough to keep your breasts from feeling uncomfortably full. But the advice on mastitis is to express frequently. I assume this is targeted at mastitis in early breastfeeding. I don't really have much milk anymore, so I'm not sure expressing is very helpful in terms of flushing the infection. I'd prefer to express once a day or so, whenever my uninfected breast feels a bit full. Is this a bad idea?
    1 replies | 20 view(s)
  • @llli*kmrs's Avatar
    Today, 03:06 AM
    Last week (he was 3 weeks old) was the worst as far as cluster feeding goes. It was all day every day. I was trying to read about it online bc it felt crazy to be sitting there for 8 hrs or more. I kept seeing people writing about the 3 week mark.. how its notorious for clustering. This week, he has (on his own) been eating more 'normally'. Every 2-3 hrs or so for about an hr. I think this kind of confirms to me that I need to follow his lead. He knows what he needs? I really never thought breast feeding would be so complicated, but when I get frustrated bc I feel like I'm doing something wrong, I just dumb it down to 'on demand' and err on the side of him being fed and not hungry. I just hope things naturally even out before he goes to daycare. Thanks again for you replies!
    7 replies | 267 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:35 PM
    Wow that is great baby is gaining so well! Ignore parenting advice from doctors? I really do not know what else to say about what your ped said. You are not a human pacifier, a pacifier is a plastic replacement breast. Since baby is gaining so well, if and when you need a break, feel free to have someone else take baby and get a break. (No need for baby to be fed by anyone else necessarily, there are many ways to comfort a baby- I will attach some articles about that) If you think a pacifier is a good idea, ok, but just as with bottles they can cause issues, so use it sparingly and never let it take the place of a feeding. But taking a break or using a pacifier are parenting choices you may or may not choose to make. You are doing fine as you are. Babies love to nurse and will do so a lot. It is their job. fussy baby tips: http://www.llli.org/docs/0000000000000001WAB/WAB_Tear_sheet_Toolkit/09_fussybabyideas.pdf and http://www.llli.org/docs/0000000000000001WAB/WAB_Tear_sheet_Toolkit/10_what_about_partners.pdf
    7 replies | 267 view(s)
  • @llli*kmrs's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:18 PM
    Thanks! We tried a bottle today. Just did an oz when he cued and finished on the breast. He did ok enough that I won't worry about him taking one. We'll probably just throw one in here and there like that or in the rare circumstances that I'm not there to feed him. He had his one month Dr appt today and he gained 1 lb 3 oz in just about 2 weeks! So that encourages me! Pediatrician says that the 8 hr feeds are too long and that I am a human pacifier. That I should cut feed times down, space time between feedings and consider using a pacifier. Anyone have any thoughts on this?
    7 replies | 267 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:16 PM
    I would just say it is a matter of the four month fussies and leave it at that, except the poop changes actually sound like baby perhaps has a little virus moving through his system causing mild diarrhea. This would of course also explain frequent waking and discomfort. I am not sure what you mean by baby "gets milk and reacts badly to it" but if you think eating is painful, supposedly that can indicate reflux. However reflux is a very tricky diagnoses and way over-diagnosed. I suppose a virus might make baby actually feel slightly nauseous, now that I think about it.
    2 replies | 71 view(s)
  • @llli*momof3tobe's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:15 PM
    Thank you! My partner is not planning to breastfeed, but she would pump while she is home after the birth. I keep telling her she might change her mind once instinct kicks in. So we can supplement with her milk in the Lact Aid device. She doesn't want to pump when she goes back to work though. How would I know, I guess there is no way to, if the herbs and pumping would work without having to use the drugs. We wouldn't know until the babies were here and started feeding I guess? How long of pumping and herbs would it take to actually produce milk so I could know if I need the drugs?
    3 replies | 145 view(s)
  • @llli*peanutbutter7's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:13 PM
    My baby is 4.5 months and after a 3+ weeks of pooping once a day or every other day, (none at night) he started going a lot more last week. He poops around the clock now, the largest ones being early morning and late afternoon with several small ones in between. It's watery and almost always green. He also pulls on my nipples, repeatedly latches/unlatches and sometimes cries or fusses during this. He seems to get some milk, react badly to it then immediately go back for more, over And over. At first I thought he wanted the other breast but he does thus with both. I ebf, rarely have dairy and haven't changed anything in my diet. He's going through a sleep regression and WW19 so I've been stressed and eating/drinking less but that's it. Any idea what could be going on?
    2 replies | 71 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:32 PM
    Do you notice baby nursing less often since this started? My guess would be that it is more likely that your pump output, not your production, is decreasing, due to either the pump needing some troubleshooting or just because you are hitting the dreaded 'pump slump." one more 'meal" of solids is not likely to impact milk production but it depends on what we mean by a "meal." Some of those baby food jars are enormous. How much fruit are we talking? Is it in a puree? (so contains lots of water as well) etc. I do not think it is appropriate to send less milk. If baby was older and eating lots and lots of solids that would be one thing, but for a 7-8 year old, 8 ounces seems perfectly reasonable for a 7 hour separation. Of course if you just do not have that much to send, you will need to decide whether to pump more often, consider formula, or yes send less milk which may mean you have to ask them to increase solids. From who and why? If you mean just from the daycare, I would suggest, do not let them pressure you. On the other hand, I do not think that 3 "meals" a day plus 8 ounces for an 8 month old is unreasonable- again, it depends what they mean by "meals"-it may help to know- how much exactly is baby being offered? Is baby given a bowl of food and allowed to eat with hands, or spoon fed? Is eating more self directed (this can be done even if baby is spoon fed, but it takes time and patience and caregiver "communicating" with baby) or is baby "encouraged"...
    1 replies | 74 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:10 PM
    Impossible to say. A hospital grade pump is designed to be used multiple times a day by a mom who needs to pump that often to increase/promote normal milk production. A P&S and all others in that class are meant to be used 2-3 times a day 5 days a week by moms who have a normal milk production established and are only pumping because they are separated from baby. So in theory, yes a hospital grade pump would make a difference. However in practice it really depends on the situation. Some moms do best with hand expression or a manual pump. There is a wide variety of normal. So from lowest known weight of 7lbs 4 ounces at day (I am guessing) 3 or so, baby gained 20 ounces in 30 days to weigh 8lbs 9 oz on day 33. That is a bit slow, but sounds better and is more accurate than to say "baby only gained 5 ounces from birth weight." I am surprised no 2 week or thereabouts check was done given the concern early on. It would be nice to know if gain has been steady, was slow to get going, or is slower now. 20 ounces in 30 day averages to 2/3 ounce a day or about 4 and a half ounces a week. It is slow, but not that far off the normal range. Now that you are supplementing 2-4 ounces of formula a day, how is gain? Also how much of your own milk in bottles does baby get each day? You do not have to answer, IO am just saying, these are the questions to ask yourself as you figure out exactly what baby is needing to gain normally. When figuring out the puzzle of slow gain,...
    4 replies | 124 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:14 AM
    Basically I mean do not push her or insist or get upset if she does not nurse. I am guessing that your OP/FFLD is the root cause of baby resisting nursing. So it might take time to convince baby that the answer is more frequent nursing. You don't want to make things worse by getting stressed out about it. this is a good article about how to gently encourage nursing. http://kellymom.com/ages/newborn/nb-challenges/back-to-breast/ Usually the simplest way to gently offer the breast is to spend lots of time snuggling baby skin to skin or with easy access. If baby does not like being held, try different holds or positions, or relax (sitting) on the couch with baby kind of beside you etc. (I do not mean lay down and sleep with baby on couch- couch is not safe surface for this.
    5 replies | 144 view(s)
  • @llli*djs.mom's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:29 AM
    Oh! OK! So Karo syrup works. And also? All P fruits. So if you are giving her plenty of solids, Pears, Peaches, Plums also loosed things up. And besides Milk, feed her water and keep her away from foods like rice and bananas. Which actually also constipate.
    9 replies | 353 view(s)
  • @llli*goli79's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:36 AM
    thanks for the tips! she is definitely on the mend. what a rough 2-3 weeks that was. we've now generated a new problem: my daughter refuses to sleep unless it's next to me, in my bed, with my nipple in her mouth. and she seems to get up frequently as if to check to make sure i'm still there. it's always something.
    6 replies | 393 view(s)
More Activity