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  • @llli*dormir41's Avatar
    Today, 04:13 PM
    So glad to hear! Best wishes for his recovery.
    4 replies | 264 view(s)
  • @llli*dormir41's Avatar
    Today, 03:56 PM
    Interesting question! I wasn't told I had to pump, but I was told the every 2 hours crap as well. The every 2 hours is more what my daughter does now at 4 1/2 mths . . . .well, more or less. She changes things every time I think I've figured her out . . . .babies!:lol I started pumping maybe 2 or 3 days in bc baby refused the breast . . .my milk came in, she was fussy, who knows. I've since learned this is very common at that age. I continued pumping to build my stash once she was nursing again but mostly one breast while nursing the other, and usually only once a day. Now I pump at work to keep my supply and to ensure she has at least some milk while I'm away. I'm now wondering if I just need help with my pump since I get a lot at certain times but struggle at others. I'd love to see bf support that actually makes sense at the hospital. I have at least one friend who had an awful experience. She had inverted nipples and instead of working with her on it, they made her bottle feed formula and she lost weight until they switched her to special formula. I think it still haunts her today . . .her daughter is a fantastic 7 yr old that nonetheless has tons of health issues. It wasn't until I came on here and met with a good LC that I started figuring out what I really needed to do . . . and almost none of it coincided well with what I was told in the hospital.
    2 replies | 41 view(s)
  • @llli*dormir41's Avatar
    Today, 03:28 PM
    Maddieb is way more expert in this than I am, and my baby is 4 1/2 months, so I have a ways to go. I am, however, back at work so can speak to pumping at work and feeding while at home. If you aren't concerned about how much milk you get when you pump, you probably don't have to pump as often as I do, but I need to pump at least 3x and I try for 5. i guess it depends on your workday and what you are hoping to accomplish. I nurse before I leave home, as soon as I get home, and nurse her to sleep (plus overnight feedings, but it doesn't sound like you need to). Here are some good articles that may help you. http://kellymom.com/bf/pumpingmoms/pumping/milkcalc/ http://www.workandpump.com/firstday.htm http://www.llli.org/faq/pumpfreq.html
    3 replies | 74 view(s)
  • @llli*midnightsangel's Avatar
    Today, 03:14 PM
    I also wonder this! I'm a young mom and I have had a lot of people tell me to be prepared to lose my milk around a year and that I won't be able to nurse a toddler. What the heck? I tell them that is entirely possible to nurse for many years and that our Western culture is the reason why a lot of moms aren't successful with their long term breastfeeding goals. I think women have problems because they're told to get on a rigid schedule and all of that stupid baby wise stuff. I know I wasn't prepared for how much time nursing took in the early weeks. No one told me to expect to nurse more than 10 times an hour. Everyone told me they eat every 2 to 3 hours. That's not true at all. All of this misinformation has encouraged me to start on the path to be an IBCLC. I get so angry when people spread bad information and I want to do my part for future mothers to start on the right path with an advocate that will be on their side.
    2 replies | 41 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    Today, 01:42 PM
    I really wish someone had told me about the leaking before my first - I just had no idea! Lots of washing of bedding!
    4 replies | 91 view(s)
  • @llli*ngs215's Avatar
    Today, 01:42 PM
    Yes, I know it is a large stash. It was rather unintentional. I only had 25oz when I went back to work. I respond well to the pump, and DD doesn't take a whole lot at daycare. Even pumping once a day for 10 minutes, I pump more than she takes. She takes the frozen milk just fine. I am going to stop pumping when we move, so I can't exactly just make more. I know I could donate, but my first got to use up the freezer stash after I stopped pumping and he took expressed milk at daycare until 21 months. I feel like I should give DD the same opportunity. Mommy guilt is powerful. But it looks like styrofoam coolers in the car is going to be my best bet.
    4 replies | 170 view(s)
  • @llli*littlecavemomma's Avatar
    Today, 01:21 PM
    So I just have a general question. I had a baby in Nov 14 and was never given much advice about breastfeeding or pumping, even though I did see an LC just to make sure I was doing everything right. I never really pumped unless the baby and I overslept and I woke up engorged. I wanted to keep the outside interventions minimal so I could see what my body would do on its own. I didn't start pumping with any kind of regularity until a few weeks prior to returning to work. I've had several friends (or friends wives) give birth over the last few months and one of the first things they all mention is how exhausted they are with the pumping. They're "either nursing or pumping all day long." When I ask them why they're pumping they just say it's what they were told to do to boost supply. Where did this advice come from?!? I have a hard time believing that many people have such supply issues that they have all been told to begin a pumping routine immediately after birth. Am I wrong? It's not even logical if you consider what people would have done before pumps were invented! I know there are circumstances where mothers might have their milk delayed and need some extra stimulation, but is it THAT widespread that it has become blanket advice?
    2 replies | 41 view(s)
  • @llli*filmmommy's Avatar
    Today, 12:51 PM
    My babies had bad latches, and I knew it -- ouch! I am so happy to hear your daughters will be helping out. I just wanted to chime in on that part -- we have hired younger nannies for both of our kids for the first few years. My daughter started daycare at about 20 months and my son will likely start around 2. We like to have the kids at home when they're babies. Can I suggest that you encourage them to learn as much about breastfeeding and child care as possible for their sake? We have hired younger people so that they will not come deciding they know everything, and also because we cannot pay a lot -- we are not wealthy people, just really wanted to keep the kids at home while little (my husband works from home and I do one or two days a week). They could very easily make a good living while going to college as a nanny. We have done everything in our power to accommodate our current nanny's school schedule, so even with the lower wage we can pay it has worked out well for her. I spent my college time partying, but may have been better served doing some child care instead!
    7 replies | 197 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 12:13 PM
    Gosh I am so sorry I missed your reply and forgot to post those links about paced feeding. The overall amount baby is fed sounds reasonable for a 10+ hour separation, but since you nurse baby at lunch time that changes the expected total and I would in that case question baby getting more than 10 ounces a day from bottles as a regular thing, and I still think 4 ounces at a time, every time is a lot. FYI overall intake should not go up as baby ages, although meal size may, but 4 ounces would be the top. How are things going now? Here is that info I was going to post and forgot: http://www.llli.org/docs/0000000000000001WAB/WAB_Tear_sheet_Toolkit/22_bfabreastfedbaby.pdf Video with doll: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UH4T70OSzGs and with baby: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ykdFuEOIdeE
    3 replies | 142 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 11:57 AM
    Yes that kind of day care can be very frustrating! Glad you have your daughters to help this time around! I can point you to some good online videos etc. about paced bottle feeding if you like. Babies nursing a ton in the evening is 100% normal and very common. Not that knowing that is any help... Here are some nice ideas for comforting fussy baby. For mom AND her helpers. http://www.llli.org/docs/0000000000000001WAB/WAB_Tear_sheet_Toolkit/09_fussybabyideas.pdf and http://www.llli.org/docs/0000000000000001WAB/WAB_Tear_sheet_Toolkit/10_what_about_partners.pdf
    7 replies | 197 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 11:50 AM
    White or clear lip blister on center of top lip is normal. Blue- This can be normal when it is in an isolated area and faint, however, just to be safe, I would suggest call the doctor about blue skin. As far as chapped, the only possible issue there would be if baby is dehydrated. If baby is gaining normally and having normal output, (pees and poops) then there is no reason to suspect dehydration. The only thing I see in the picture is the 'milk blister' on the top lip, and again, that is normal. Breastfeeding going ok overall? Any issues?
    1 replies | 65 view(s)
  • @llli*jewell0405's Avatar
    Today, 09:53 AM
    My baby is one month today, and gradually over the last several days I noticed his lips appear chapped/white/and sometimes what looks like a hint of blue. Has anyone else experienced this? Hopefully the two pictures uploaded that I took of his lips. Thanks in advance!!
    1 replies | 65 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 09:26 AM
    I guess I do not understand why you need to get feedings down to twice a day. Even if you did, there is no guarantee you would not start to feel full and need to pump or hand express while at work. If your baby nurses 5 times a day, baby is relying on that milk as an important part of their nutrition. There is nothing unusual about this, and if baby's nursing sessions are cut in half, baby will need something else to make up that shortfall. Additionally, trying to wean baby down to 2 nursing sessions a day before baby is ready will quite possibly lead to a more rapid than otherwise complete weaning. If you want to breastfeed as long as possible, I would suggest, start pumping maybe once a day (it need not be every day) before you go back to work, and whatever you get, freeze to leave for husband to give baby for when you are separated. Don't worry about how much you get each pump session but DO make sure your pump is working properly. When you are back at work, pump at work at least once a day and save that milk for baby to have the next day. For the weekend away, pump when you can. There is no need to stay on the same 'schedule' baby nurses. Assuming your pump works well, you will probably be ok pumping 3-4 times each 24 hour day during that weekend. Will that work do you think?
    3 replies | 74 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 08:54 AM
    Hi. I will be perfectly honest, I am not a big believer in "slow flow." Rarely, some moms certainly have an issue of not being able to let down at all, or let downs taking a very long time, but as your baby is gaining fine and breastfeeding is otherwise going well I am not sure that fits... Where "slow" flow becomes a real problem is not because moms flow is literally slow, but rather that baby has been bottle fed in an improper (not breastfeeding supportive) way often or long enough that baby has become used to the unnaturally fast flow of the gravity method bottle and becomes unhappy with the normal effort and milk flow of nursing. Spray is nice to see when a mom is effectively hand expressing, but there are many reasons milk would 'just drip" when you do so. As far as when baby pulls off, if you were spraying at that point I would suspect baby was reacting to a too FAST flow, or fast letdown. Possibly related to, not indicative of, I would say. If baby is gaining normally when exclusively breastfed, no reason to suspect low milk production. Switching sides and breast compressions can be used when needed as long as needed. There is no drawback to them (well, switching sides frequently during a session increases milk production, so if that is not necessary, that is a possible drawback) but whether you HAVE to do them or for how long is unknowable. But it is not really a big deal if you did - Breast compressions sound complicated when they are described, but...
    1 replies | 65 view(s)
  • @llli*dormir41's Avatar
    Today, 08:25 AM
    I haven't used them either, but there are lots of reviews on Amazon as well that may help you decide. http://www.amazon.com/Milkies-Milk-Saver-Breast-Collector-Storage/dp/B001SMBRWO/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1432909301&sr=8-1&keywords=milkies They kind of sound similar to Freemie, except that is a pump attachment and much more expensive. http://www.amazon.com/Freemie-Collection-Cups-Concealable-Funnels/dp/B00UV6JDN8/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1432909614&sr=8-1&keywords=freemie+collection+cups+deluxe+set
    2 replies | 49 view(s)
  • @llli*dandelions's Avatar
    Today, 08:19 AM
    The DOL link maddieb mentioned has a good FAQ. Generally speaking, your employer has to provide you reasonable break time for expressing milk. This is not the same as the 15 min paid break / 4 hours worked that you're entitled to under Federal law (though I don't know of anything preventing their overlap). "Reasonable" is not explicitly defined to my knowledge, but most employers would grant somewhere in the range of 20-30 min every 4 hours, but that doesn't have to be paid. (Most of the pumping moms I work are at work for 9hr/day.) Less than that is arguably not reasonable time to go to a specific room, get your pump parts together, pump, wash parts, store milk & return to your desk/station. Maybe your employer / boss just isn't aware of how long things take? Probably a calm conversation with your manager or HR is a good way to start; explaining that you're breastfeeding & obviously the typical breaks everyone gets aren't sufficient, so you'd like help navigating the company's policy to provide you the breaks you need for pumping. Hopefully it's just an oversight & they work with you :)
    6 replies | 336 view(s)
  • @llli*soap.mom's Avatar
    Today, 08:18 AM
    Thank you both for your advice! I've tried the reclined positions a little, but haven't quite gotten them down yet. I'll try it out some more. bfwmomof3, I sleep with a towel too! I'm glad to hear that things will get easier...I was starting to wonder if it would be like this through the entire breastfeeding experience.
    4 replies | 91 view(s)
  • @llli*hayashi's Avatar
    Today, 07:46 AM
    I never used them, but there is a review at http://babyproducts.about.com/od/breastfeedingsupplies/gr/milk_saver.htm
    2 replies | 49 view(s)
  • @llli*tianasmum's Avatar
    3 replies | 74 view(s)
  • @llli*tianasmum's Avatar
    Today, 07:20 AM
    Hi Ladies, I am Mum to an 11th month old very healthy BF baby girl. She eats really well now but still BF five times per day (7am, 9am, 4pm, 7pm, 11pm). I really want to continue breastfeeding for as long as possible but I go back to work on July 1st and on July 17th I am away for a girls weekend for 2 nights leaving my husband in control. My question is, how do I get my baby down to 2 feeds a day (morning and night) so I can work, and in addition, when do I pump the milk needed to cover the missing feeds when I will be away for the weekend? I plan on taking the pump with me and pump and dump (as I will be drinking and don´t want to lose my supply either). I have not pumped for around 9 months so I have no idea how much milk I am producing either. I don´t know anyone that has breastfed this long so have nobody reliable to ask.
    3 replies | 74 view(s)
  • @llli*bxlgirl's Avatar
    Today, 06:50 AM
    Hi LLLadies, I just came across this while searching for a solution to my daily milk spot problem: nursing pads that collect milk, under the brand name Milkies. I have never heard of these. Has anyone used them? If they work I'd be happy to use them on my bike commute when maternity leave ends. Actually I would loooove to wear them like nursing pads because I have a shift job in emergency response and it's never possible to pump at the same time. But my letdowns are like clockwork. If our air conditioning is up to it I could wear a big, big scarf around my shoulders to drape over and hide any lumps. Do these things work?
    2 replies | 49 view(s)
  • @llli*bxlgirl's Avatar
    Today, 06:44 AM
    Psst--car commuters finally have an advantage. I can't pump en route to work as I'm a bike commuter :lol
    12 replies | 499 view(s)
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