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  • @llli*juleswc's Avatar
    Today, 10:59 AM
    Thank you for the input! I wouldn't say her latch is painful I guess maybe it's just different so I notice it...I will try some positioning adjustments.
    2 replies | 17 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 10:52 AM
    Ok so typical intake for that period of time would be about 10-15 ounces. But not all babies take in the typical amount! My best suggestion is to try to increase what baby will eat during the day but try not to get too hung up on the numbers, if that makes sense. 6-8 hours is a long sleep stretch ("Sleeping through the night" is actually defined as 5 consecutive hours) and many babies do not start sleeping that long consistently until they are well over a year old. Again when a baby does sleep that long early on, whether they do so on their own or due to some other reason, they often change that sleep pattern a few months later. More food into baby during the day may help baby sleep a bit longer at night, but you also may be many months away from baby consistently sleeping long stretches again. Actually the most common issue is something called "excess lipase" and it can make expressed milk smell and taste a bit soapy, some people say the smell is "metallic." The milk is not bad, it is perfectly safe to drink, and many babies will drink it fine. But some babies react to the smell and will not. This issue appears after expressed milk has been stored, usually when it has been frozen, but in some cases even after refrigeration. If baby is reacting the same way to "fresh" milk and there is no soapy smell, you can probably rule out lipase. Yes actually spoiled milk would smell spoiled. It is quite simple and common sense, really. I will link a video....
    5 replies | 175 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 10:31 AM
    Actually this does seem to be fairly common. But the same 'rules' apply- nursing should not hurt, if it does, something may need to be adjusted. Latch changes might be brought on by teething, baby getting "lazy" (just not careful) about latch, baby getting acrobatic at the breast, or due to positioning. Or all of the above. As a baby gets older, it is usually needed to adjust positioning so that baby has room to tilt their head back a bit when latching and nursing, so that the chin does not tuck. Of course another reason nursing might hurt at this age has to do with hormonal changes mom may be going through. Pregnancy can make nursing painful, and simply the return of fertility (ovulation, menstruating) might cause temporary sensitivity. Thrush is also a small possibility when nursing starts to hurt at this age. The teeth scraping part of this article might be helpful. http://kellymom.com/ages/older-infant/biting/
    2 replies | 17 view(s)
  • @llli*allirawlins's Avatar
    Today, 08:12 AM
    When I first went back to work when she was 4 months old she did refuse the bottle at first but after a couple days she was eating about 10-15oz spread out throughout the 10 hours I was gone. That went on until she hit 6 months and I was off for a week at Christmas. When she first went back in January she ate fine for a few days and then out of nowhere she pretty much stopped eating from the bottle and had about 4 to 6oz per day. Now she is having even less then that most days eating only about .5oz to maybe an oz about two times per day. I am having my caregiver give more oatmeal with more milk in it and also mixing milk into her purees. Some nights my baby is also up every hour. I have kind of ended up co-sleeping since I feed her laying on my side in bed so I can at least rest while she is eating and she has been just falling asleep in bad with me. Some nights she will sleep part of the night in her pack n play, which is where she used to sleep before the daytime hunger strike happened. I just want to make sure she is eating enough so if I have to feed her at night I will definitely continue to do that. The sippy cups we have tried so far are the nuk learner cup, munchkin 360 trainer cup, munchkin straw sippy cup, and I just got the Philips avent. I have not yet tried the tommee tippy but thank you for the suggestion! I was also thinking at this point it might be better to just give up on the bottles and just try cups since we will be heading that way soon...
    5 replies | 175 view(s)
  • @llli*juleswc's Avatar
    Today, 08:08 AM
    Hi all. My baby girl turns 6 months this week and for the past week I've noticed her latch feels different. Like she's taking more breast in her mouth and its borderline uncomfortable. Is it common for latches to change as baby gets older? She's EBF and doesn't take a soother or bottle. But she is teething hard.
    2 replies | 17 view(s)
  • @llli*allirawlins's Avatar
    Today, 07:58 AM
    Thank you so much for responding! To answer some of your questions, ,my baby is separated from me for about 10 hours. I will definitely not stop nursing at night especially since she is not eating much during the day during the week. On the weekends she sleeps much better only waking one or two times to eat. She used to sleep 6 to 8 hours at night sometimes more up until 6 months old. She did this by herself I never did any sleep training or anything like that and always fed her if she did wake in the night, but that was pretty rare up until she was 6 months old. I don't think there is a taste problem to the milk as I tried giving her milk that was just expressed when my mom watched her on a weekend and during the week she gets either defrosted frozen milk or milk from the previous days pumping that was refrigerated over night and she reacts the same to all of it. I smell the milk also and it always smells fine to me. I assume that if it was bad it would smell similar to bad cows milk? Am I right in that assumption? My caregiver is my husbands cousin and has been very sympathetic to our feeding issues and is up to trying anything to get my baby to take a bottle again. Since baby has taken less milk at a time, .5oz to maybe 2oz, I have her offer milk more frequently about every 2 hours (which is closer to how frequent she eats with me when breastfeeding) than before but baby is just refusing to eat most of the time and about twice in the 10 hours she has some milk...
    5 replies | 175 view(s)
  • @llli*tasha's Avatar
    Today, 07:04 AM
    Thank you.* It's very useful to have another point of view and I do agree that breast milk is not in itself damaging however my daughter has problems with her enamel, we do not know why and while I believe breast milk* is less damaging than other food at this point I think anything left on her teeth is creating decay. My daughter does not have anything except water to drink from her sippy cup and has a balanced diet.* I have always breastfed on demand and we brush her teeth at least 3 times a day a tooth paste that contains xylitol.* Again thank you so much for your input, I'm at my wits end watching her teeth get worse.* So far I've been told by 3 different dentists to stop breastfeeding completely as in their opinion breast milk is worse than food.
    6 replies | 113 view(s)
  • @llli*tralala.pom's Avatar
    Today, 03:28 AM
    The two things you have mentioned are not all the drawbacks of pacifiers. If interested in more, you may find this a good read: http://www.analyticalarmadillo.co.uk/search/label/Dummies%2FPacifiers Instead of a pacifier in the evening, two things come to my mind: 1) just use your pinky (of course, cut off the nail, wash properly with water without detergents) - that always did the trick for me when my son needed non-nutritive sucking and/or 2) put the baby into a baby wrap and take a walk in the evening (inside or maybe even better outside) - the motion and closeness will help him sleep. Do you have enough information/guidance on how to deal with OALD?
    2 replies | 117 view(s)
  • @llli*longtalltexan's Avatar
    Today, 01:19 AM
    Hi mommadaw! Sorry for the delayed reply! In those early weeks, I would sometimes hold him against my chest or on my shoulder and bounce on a yoga ball while singing to him until he calmed down or fell asleep. I'd also try walking him up and down the hall in the dark while singing, or putting him in a front carrier like an Ergo or sling and walking outside for a while until he fell asleep. DH also took him for some walks to get him to fall asleep so he could nurse more calmly.
    8 replies | 1635 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:45 PM
    I am sorry you are having this difficulty with your child's dental health. There are many reasons a child might be particularly prone to tooth decay- it may be genetic, due to in utero factors, or be more or less bad luck when it comes to what type of bacteria colonizes baby's oral cavity. So, it may have nothing to do with your child's diet. According to the Journal of the American Dental Association article I am linking below, there is no conclusive evidence that either nursing or night nursing is a contributive factor to a child being prone to decay. From what I understand, once a child has severe decay, ANY food left on the teeth might pose a problem as it breaks down. Obviously young children need to eat and drink frequently, so it then becomes a matter of keeping the teeth as clean as possible between meals. I am unaware of any studies that indicate that breastmilk is any worse than any other carbohydrate source that might coat teeth and cause decay. I am also not aware of any studies that indicate that preventing a child from nursing at night helps stem already existent tooth decay. If brushing your child's teeth overnight is too difficult, have you tried wiping the teeth instead?
    6 replies | 113 view(s)
  • @llli*tasha's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:06 PM
    That's really useful thank you.** My daughter does not use a pacifier and we did try to get her to at different stages but she has never been interested and only became irritated when we've insisted.** I think the biggest problem will be going to sleep and so far I have been nursing and then trying to brush her teeth as best as I can without waking her up which of course is not that successful.* I'm finding it really awful because like you mentioned it is horrible when they are asking you and you can't nurse them and I can see me daughter is more unsettled and insecure during the day as a result.** Thanks again
    6 replies | 113 view(s)
  • @llli*orangecat88's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:58 AM
    My daughter is 19 months old. We actually night weaned her for the first time when she was about 8 months old. That experience would be very different than with a toddler, however over the holidays she had a long illness and basically became completely un night-weaned for about a month (during which we were brushing her teeth like 3 times per night after she nursed) and we had to do it all over again when she was 17 months. I'll just tell you about the second time.... I nurse her before she goes to sleep, but then we have a snack and brush teeth after nursing. She does use a pacifier to go to sleep. Without the pacifier I honestly have no idea how she would sleep at all so if your daughter doesn't use one this will probably be more challenging. My daughter would then wake up around midnight, but instead of nursing we lay down with her on a mattress we have on the floor and cuddle her. She has a special stuffed animal that she holds and sometimes she likes to reach down my shirt and touch my breasts briefly just to make sure their still there. From there she usually sleeps for a for few more hours with minimal drama. 4 am is where the really struggle started. She would wake up then and decide she HAD to nurse, and she can say "mommy! nurse!" too, which is heartbreaking. We just had a conversation with her and explained that nursing at night would give her teeth boo-boos and they would hurt so we have to wait until the sun is up. Honestly she threw a full on temper...
    6 replies | 113 view(s)
  • @llli*rosesmum's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:54 AM
    I had this when I nursed my daughter and I asked here and a nursing consultant and no one had any answers for me...on the positive side it only lasted a few months and then went away. Also, it didn't effect my milk supply... Right now I'm nursing my son and the pain didn't return. Link to my old thread: http://forums.llli.org/showthread.php?121152-Breast-pain&p=1341575#post1341575
    2 replies | 219 view(s)
  • @llli*tasha's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:29 AM
    Hi and thanks so much for your reply. Put of interest how old is your daughter? How did you go about it? Did you just explain? I ended up giving up last night stereo a few hours we were both in tears. I'm pretty sure it is for comfort than being hungry and she loves breastfeeding. I feel terribly guilty stopping her and terribly guilty continuing. I think at this I will try again at the weekend as we all have to get up for work etc during the week.
    6 replies | 113 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    February 19th, 2017, 09:06 PM
    Without a complete weight history from birth I only have a limited understanding of what is going on, but if my math is correct, those specific numbers mean: That between the 12 and the 16th, 4 days, baby gained normally (very slightly over an ounce a day) and then in the 3 days between the 16th and the 19th, baby gained nothing. But we only know that because baby is being weighed very frequently. Another way to look at is that between the 12 and today, 7 days, baby gained 5 ounces, or an average of .71 ounces per day, which is below average but within normal parameters. One thing to consider is babies do not gain the same every day. The average total of gain of "about" 1 ounce a day is something that is measured over the first few months, not days. In other words, baby not gaining for 3 days may be entirely normal. But if you think your baby is not getting enough milk, there are several things to do. Another mom with a newborn about your baby's age is also having issues with slow gain. You might find that thread has some info you can use? Let me know if that is helpful at all. http://forums.llli.org/showthread.php?126759-Low-supply
    1 replies | 96 view(s)
  • @llli*ndw11717's Avatar
    February 19th, 2017, 08:33 PM
    LO will be 5 weeks old on Tuesday, he is ebf. We purchased a scale when he was 2 weeks old because weight gain was slow so we wanted to make sure he was transferring enough so we are able to weigh as much as we want. That being said he weighed 8lbs 5oz on the 12th, 8lbs 10oz the 16th and today he is still 8lbs 10oz. Starting the 16th we let him sleep as long as he would at night (only happened one night for 5 hours), the other two nights he woke every 2-3 hours. The max he has gone during the day is 3 hours, and always acts content after feeding and usually falls asleep at the breast when he is done. Has had 12+ wet and 3-4 big dirty diapers daily. My understanding is he is getting enough milk from what he is showing and his wet and dirty diapers. I though I was starting to get the hang of this :cry . What do I do? Get back on a tighter schedule?
    1 replies | 96 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    February 19th, 2017, 06:43 PM
    OK thanks for answering all those questions. So given what you report, I suspect that if there is a problem, it has more to do with baby not transferring milk well and not so much about milk production. Unfortunately, since baby not transferring milk well will LEAD to low milk production even if production starts out entirely normal (or with the potential to be normal) then it is possible that low production is starting to happen or is on the horizon unless interventions are taken. Since you had IV fluids during labor which is known to inflate birth weight, and birth weight was taken on a scale baby was never weighed on again, (as is typical) I think it makes sense to simply throw the recorded birth weight out of any consideration. Normally I would keep the next weight check, but since the next weight after that was only a day later and on the same scale used from then on, my suggestion is to measure gain from January 18. Please check my math, but here is what I have: From January 18th to February 16th, a period of 29 days, baby gained a total of 1 pound 6 ounces, or 22 ounces, or an average of .75 ounces per day. This is within normal gain specifications, but it certainly would be more reassuring if baby was gaining more like an average of an ounce a day. Also gain did not seem to get more rapid, as would be typical after about 2 weeks. Instead it seems to be slowing down. Given that you have also had nipple injury and continue to have pain when nursing, I...
    3 replies | 155 view(s)
  • @llli*orangecat88's Avatar
    February 19th, 2017, 04:43 PM
    Hi, I'm sorry your going through this. I night weaned my daughter a while ago because I was afraid of decay. It was only rough for a night or two. We just explained to her that we can only nurse when the sun is up and we gave her lots of cuddles. She cried for almost the whole first night, but the next night she was basically fine and has been fine every since. Children are very adaptable, and a few rough nights will not cause any long-term harm. To ward off any nighttime hunger, we always give my daughter a big snack before she goes to bed and this seems to help. Please just remember that you are doing the right thing. A 21 month old is perfectly capable of going all night without nursing. I assume you're going to continue nursing during the day? Even if not, remember that nursing at this age has only marginal benefits, but tooth decay is very painful and may cause problems in the adult teeth. You are absolutely doing the right thing.
    6 replies | 113 view(s)
  • @llli*tasha's Avatar
    February 19th, 2017, 03:12 PM
    Hi My toddler has always breastfed on demand. She has pretty bad tooth decay even if we have always brushed her teeth 3 times a day, she doesn't have juice or a bottle but she does nurse through the night. One of her teeth has almost completly disintegrated now and the three dentists we have consulted have all said that she has an enamel defect and I have to wean her ASAP, i really dont want to so i am cleaning her teeth during the day but during the night it's impossible without waking her I am currently trying to night wean her and to be honest it is breaking my heart. She is crying and miserable. I don't know how to help her with this. Can anyone give me some suggestions?
    6 replies | 113 view(s)
  • @llli*laylas.momma's Avatar
    February 19th, 2017, 01:20 PM
    Thank you for all the helpful info on supplementing! I'd love further thoughts :) ...see below for answers to your questions. *Please give an exact weight check history, with day of life and corresponding number on scale. Please note whenever a different scale was used. 1/15 (birth) 8lbs 4oz 1/17 (discharge) 7lbs 6oz 1/18 (first pedi visit, different scale, not digital) 7lbs 9oz 1/20 (same scale) 8lbs 3oz 1/25 (same scale) 8lbs 5oz 1/30 (same scale) 8lbs 8oz 2/16 (same scale) 8lbs 15oz
    3 replies | 155 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    February 19th, 2017, 11:45 AM
    Hi laylas.momma. The behavior you describe could mean many things and is usually simply normal. Slow weight gain could be an indication of low milk production. But it is also possible that the problem is with how well baby can transfer milk. Or slow gain is related to baby not nursing often enough or not nursing long enough when baby nurses. Very rarely, poor gain has nothing to do with intake and indicates there is a medical concern. Also, gain is tricky to measure especially in the first several weeks for multiple reasons. Since baby is pooping within normal parameters, that would seem to indicate that baby is getting enough milk and in fact what you are seeing with the gain is scale or human error with the weight checks. Since you are concerned, my best recommendation to you is to see a board certified lactation consultant (IBCLC) for a complete breastfeeding assessment. They should watch baby nurse, do a before and after nursing weight check, take a full history and discuss with you your baby's nursing patterns. They should be both trained and experienced. If you see a competent person, they should either be able to offer reassurance, or, if there is a problem, give you a common sense and breastfeeding supportive plan for addressing the problem. They should also provide follow up appointment(s) or at the very least follow up contact. Unfortunately, too often when there is a question of gain, many pediatricians turn to supplementing baby too quickly and...
    3 replies | 155 view(s)
  • @llli*laylas.momma's Avatar
    February 19th, 2017, 08:13 AM
    My one month old recently started tugging at my nipple and stretching her whole body when she feeds as if she's trying to get more milk but is frustrated. Last night she would cry when I pulled her off and fuss even on the boob. I should add that she quickly gained back to birth weight but since that weight gain has been slow (.5 ounces a day). We get plenty of pee diapers but poop frequency varies - some days multiple smaller poops and some days 1-2 larger poops. It seems as if she wants to nurse constantly during the day, but will go 4+ hours at night if I let her. I also had mastitis about two weeks ago and was treated with an antibiotic. Are these signs my supply is low? We have a weight check on Tuesday and doc may recommend supplementing. How can I supplement while also attempting to maintain my supply so she can still benefit from the health benefits of breast milk?
    3 replies | 155 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    February 18th, 2017, 07:50 PM
    :ita The first thing to try in a situation like this is nursing the baby a lot more often, including overnight. And the first thing to avoid is reducing production. Also, there is no such thing as "low calorie milk". Where in the world did your doctor come up with that absurd idea? When it comes to weight gain, what matters is the overall volume of milk, not the quality of that milk.
    2 replies | 86 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    February 18th, 2017, 04:34 PM
    Hi maddox. Has anyone suggested nursing/feeing your baby more often? It actually would be pretty unusual for a baby to get enough to eat to gain normally nursing only 5 times in 24 hours. Normal feeding patterns for this age is 6-12 times in 24 hours. So my best suggestion is to encourage your baby to nurse more often. This is likely to help with every issue you are having- the slow gain, your feeling of being overly full in the morning, and plugs. Additionally more frequent milk removal will ensure that you make enough milk going forward for your baby. And while your expressed milk looking "watery" is actually entirely normal and does NOT mean it is "low calorie," nursing overnight at least once or twice will also probably lead to your milk not being so watery looking when you pump in the morning. I would absolutely not suggest continuing to try to decrease your milk production. In the normal course of things, milk production gradually and safely decreases on its own when and if needed as long as baby is nursing with normal frequency of 6-12 times in 24 hours. I very much doubt the problem is that you make too much milk. It is that your baby is not eating often enough.
    2 replies | 86 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    February 18th, 2017, 04:00 PM
    Hi allirawlins. How many hours are you separated from baby? I have an alternate theory of what is going on or at least, what might be contributing to the night waking. It seems unlikely to me that one week without bottles would cause bottle refusal in a baby who has been eating from bottles just fine for two months. Maybe a period of adjustment, but not something ongoing. On the other hand, a baby waking more frequently overnight at this age then they did a few weeks or months prior is entirely normal. In particular it is very common that a baby who began to "sleep through the night" earlier than average as your baby did, would start having more frequent night wakings at some point down the line. Sleep consolidation does happen as a child gets older, of course, this means that as a person ages they gradually sleep fewer hours overall but more consecutive hours at a time. But in babyhood and toddlerhood, a frequent waking pattern is entirely normal, and a child may bounce around in their sleep patterns quite a few times. If your baby is eating more at night, then they need less during the day. So the night wakings may be contributing to baby's lack of interest during the day. I would not suggest limiting your child's ability to nurse at night, but would instead suggest finding alternate ways of getting more overall sleep yourself. If baby is truly becoming hungry during the day but refusing to drink your milk, there are some things to think about.
    5 replies | 175 view(s)
  • @llli*maddox's Avatar
    February 18th, 2017, 11:47 AM
    I'm engorged every morning and I'd like to reduce the amount of this morning feed without affecting my overall supply for the remainder of the day. My baby is 6 mo and she's been sleeping through the night for the last 4 mo, so I thought the milk supply would have corrected itself by now. My lo eats 5x a day; weekdays I pump 3x and bf 2x; weekends I bf all 5 feedings. She's getting plenty to eat but she's been in the small weight range and recently stopped gaining weight and my doctor determined my milk was low calorie so now I add a scoop of formula to her bottles at daycare. (her weight gain is now back in track with this method). I'm wondering if my engorgement in the morning is causing low calorie milk because the morning milk is pretty clear compared to the rest of the day. I started pumping for less time (was doing 20 min, now only 15) but that hasn't changed anything after several weeks. I'm also prone to clogged ducts, unfortunately, so that's why I've tried gradual solutions so far. Does anyone have any tips to reduce my morning engorgement? Or does anyone have experience with low calorie milk?
    2 replies | 86 view(s)
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