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  • @llli*danipetty's Avatar
    Today, 12:23 PM
    Hello All, My baby is nearly 6 months old and for the past two months has been eating every 2 hours all night and all day. I initially thought her night feedings were just for comfort, but I recently had surgery and have been giving her 6oz of pumped milk 5 times a day (in addition to two small stage 1 food servings) and she slept through the night. It has been so nice, I considered giving her formula, but I would really like to keep exclusively breastfeeding if possible. She normally feeds every 2 hours for 5 minutes at each breast. I tried to have her go longer, but she either pulls off or falls asleep. My breasts feel soft afterwards, so I am assuming she is emptying them quickly. So basically, is there a way I could up my production during the day so she will sleep? Thank you all for your input!
    0 replies | 13 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:49 PM
    laid back nursing position may help baby find the nipple and get a better latch. This is not a single position, but rather a range of positioning where mom is leaning back comfortably and well supported by pillows or a couch back or whatever, and baby is on top of mom, but coming to the breast from any direction if that makes sense. So mom can be in any amount of lean she is comfortable with, and baby can be in any position at all. So it is something to play around with to find the way it fits for you. I will attach some links that offer more info on this type of positioning. Articles: http://www.nancymohrbacher.com/articles/2010/7/18/laid-back-breastfeeding.html https://breastfeedingusa.org/content/article/some-ins-and-outs-laid-back-breastfeeding Youtube channel with several laid back nursing videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/NancyMohrbacher More info: http://www.biologicalnurturing.com/ Another position that may help is side lying, with you and baby lying beside each other, facing each other. First, be sure baby is not too high, have baby start out nose to where nipple naturally lies. If nose to nipple is too low for him, raise him a tiny bit. In this position, you can easily angle baby into you in a way that the chin comes in first by snuggling baby's bottom into you. This puts baby in the right alignment without engaging pressure on baby's head (You can try this is laid back position too, snuggling baby into you by pulling/pushing babies bottom or...
    5 replies | 135 view(s)
  • @llli*claireb7880's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:12 PM
    Thanks for the reply again. The pain when feeding does sometimes last a while but mostly settles as the breast empties. During the times when he is cluster feeding and on and off the breast, the pain goes away after the first feed really. I don't get any pain between feeds tbh. I do get the occasional burning feeling around the nipples when he's not feeding but not all of the time. As for the latch, in glad that even though it doesn't look picture prefect that it's probably ok. I'm hoping that as he grows, the latch will improve further. I find it really difficult to get him to tip his head back so that his his chin touches the breast first. His head is obviously very floppy yet and I know you aren't meant to push their head towards the breast. I also read to try and let your baby guide himself to the breast, well there's no chance of this! He has no clue where the nipple is until its right in his face!
    5 replies | 135 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:59 PM
    I hope that was the problem!
    7 replies | 332 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:55 PM
    I think this is a good example of why latch cannot be judged by how it looks. Over and over we hear of moms being told "latch looks great" who are having pain and injury or baby transferring milk poorly, indicating the latch is certainly not great. You perhaps have the opposite problem- a comfortable latch with baby transferring milk fine, but one that does not look like other babies you see in pictures. Remember that in many cases, those pictures were chosen to "teach" a mother what latch should look like. They might be helpful for offering tips when latch is a problem, but do not let pictures of other moms and babies worry you. Every baby and mom fit together differently, and of course breast anatomy differs a great deal among mothers. So how latch feels is much more important than how it looks. As long as latch is comfortable and baby is gaining normally, there is no problem with latch. You did mention nipple sensitivity, and that may indicate latch could be a little better. In that case, you can just keep working on it. Since you are not becoming injured and baby is gaining fine, there is no emergency. Latch often improves over time as baby gets bigger and both mom and baby become more comfortable with this whole nursing thing and learn what positions etc. work best for them. Ok that does sound like letdown pain, but just to rule out anything more serious- This is pretty short-lived pain? A few moments, or does it last longer than that? Does it lessen as...
    5 replies | 135 view(s)
  • @llli*claireb7880's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:10 PM
    The reason I doubt my latch is prefect is just by looking it his mouth when he is on the breast. It just doesn't look like he has enough of the breast in his mouth, especially the bottom lip. I've looked at many latch pictures and his mouth is not as wide as they show for a good latch. As for weight, he lost 4% after birth but was back to his birth weight by 10 days. At 2 weeks he was 8lb. He's definitely not frantic when I latch him because basically as soon as he shows any feeding cues then I put him straight on for a feed. He feeds every two hours during the night and every 2/3 during the day. As for the let down pain. It starts when he starts sucking properly. It's like sharp stabbing pains in my breast. It tends to ease the softer my breasts are. The last couple of days I get a burning pain in the other boob as soon as my let down starts with the boob he's feeding off. I don't feel engourged or anything that would affect how he latches. Maybe I'm worried for nothing. I just want to make sure everything is good so that I can continue breastfeeding for a long time :)
    5 replies | 135 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:34 PM
    I am confused. How do you know latch is not "perfect?" If there is no pain, is there a problem with weight gain? Since you do not give a lowest known weight or when that was, or a two week weight, it is hard to tell if gain at this point is normal or not. As long as baby is gaining normally when nursing 10-15 times in 24 hours, and nursing is not hurting you, then latch is probably fine. If it is hard getting baby to latch, that might be helped by changing nursing positions. Have you tried laid back positioning? Among other benefits, this type of positioning gives baby a better idea of his orientation on your body so he can find the nipple more easily. If you would like more info I can send some links. Also, if baby seems really hungry or a bit frantic when they are trying to nurse, you can try offering to nurse frequently, and also getting baby to the breast quickly when baby cues. Both are helpful in avoiding or lessening the problem of a hungry or frantic baby who becomes disordered at the breast and consequently has a hard time latching. Baby getting super hungry super fast is common at this age. Can you describe the letdown pain a little? This seems to be more common when mom makes lots of milk. When mom makes lots of milk, that is a situation that often can make it harder for baby to latch. Do you think that is going on at all?
    5 replies | 135 view(s)
  • @llli*claireb7880's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:55 PM
    Hi. My baby boy is 4 weeks old. He was 7lb 13 at birth and when weighed on tues (the day before he turned 4 weeks), he was 9lb. He is ebf. The issue I am having is with his latch. He just doesn't open his mouth wide enough. I start nose to nipple and and try to encourage him to reach up for the nipple, but he doesn't open enough so I end up having to lower my nipple and settle for the latch. It's so frustrating because he turns his head in every direction when trying to find my nipple but usually it's everywhere except where my nipple actually is! Midwives have said my latch looks fine and sometimes he does latch better than others. The thing is that apart from let down pain (diagnosed by hv and mw) I don't have any other pain. My nipples are sensitive but trauma free, no cracks or bleeding. The shape also looks fine after a feed. So my question is that is it ok that the latch isn't perfect? My boy is gaining weight and has loads of wet and dirty nappies.
    5 replies | 135 view(s)
  • @llli*mymilkmatters's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:21 AM
    I have mastitis but i am on antibiotics and i would like to kno since my flow has dropped increasingly - my blocked duct has a pus coming out of it now what do i do about this when i express ? Is this normal- as i dont read about this anyhwere?
    3 replies | 267 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    April 27th, 2017, 05:39 PM
    Hello raft. I am not sure exactly what you are asking, sorry. It is not at all normal for a mother to make no milk after baby is born. Colostrum is normally in the breasts long before baby is born. Expression of that first milk, colostrum, is activated by the complete delivery of the placenta. Colostrum is thicker than mature milk and often hand expression is more effective at milk removal than pumping. (If baby cannot nurse, I mean- the best method of milk extraction is baby.) Over the several days following birth, frequent and effective milk removal moves things to the next stage, the transition to mature milk. So mom making no milk at all would indicate that perhaps there is retained placenta or some other issue. I suggest baby's mom should be examined by a doctor to rule out some physiological issue and also that she see a board certified lactation consultant (IBCLC) for in person breastfeeding assistance without delay. Mom not making any milk at all is a very urgent issue. If you would like more help here, can you possibly start your own thread so there is no confusion? Let us know if you have trouble doing this. When you start your own thread, we would need much more information in order to try to offer any help. How was the birth, how is baby being fed, what mom is doing to extract milk, etc.
    5 replies | 304 view(s)
  • @llli*raft's Avatar
    April 27th, 2017, 03:41 PM
    I am a father. Baby 5 days. Mommy does not have milk. I do not know what to do
    5 replies | 304 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    April 27th, 2017, 09:50 AM
    Ok thanks for answering my questions. This is what baby takes in on bottles. Correct? Baby is also nursing, so presumably baby is taking in more when nursing? You are right, gain over the last month appears average, so there is no clear indication baby may be getting overfed. At this point I think it would really help to do some before and after nursing weight checks. I suggest talk to LC about that because it would be best if you did this with her guidance, it is tricky to do and you need the right kind of scale. This is the most accurate way to measure what baby is actually able to take in when baby nurses, but you need to do more than one as one only tells you what happened at that one nursing session. I would suggest, do at least 3, so you can get a better idea. If baby is capable of taking in about 2 ounces at the breast in 20-30 minutes, that would be a good indication baby is able to take in more when baby nurses. At this point, baby may not be nursing with enough effectiveness simply because baby is getting so much milk/formula in bottles and is simply not motivated. Measuring how much you pump, either without nursing, or before or after baby nurses, etc, is just not as accurate a measure. Also how much baby takes in a bottle is not a good measure of what baby actually needs, although if you are using paced feeding method and giving baby lots of pauses where baby can 'tell' you they are done, you might be able to get some accuracy there. but babies...
    5 replies | 304 view(s)
  • @llli*meliz's Avatar
    April 27th, 2017, 09:06 AM
    Q: baby is just now 2 months (8 or 9 weeks) old? Or older? At what age did baby regain to birth weight? How has your baby's weight gain been since age 2 weeks? Average gain is about a half pound a week, (6-8 ounces per week) starting at age 2 weeks (before that the average gain would normally be much less) So looking at gain for the last 6 weeks (or whatever it has been since 2 weeks) is baby gaining above, below, or at average? Yes, my baby is 8.5 weeks old. Below is the weight history: 2/26 birth: 7 lbs 14 oz 2/28 2d: 7 lbs 6 oz 3/1: 7 lbs 7 oz 3/3 5d: 7 lbs 1 oz 3/6 8d: 7 lbs 5 oz
    5 replies | 304 view(s)
  • @llli*julienne02's Avatar
    April 26th, 2017, 06:58 PM
    Today he ate like normal again, so now I am wondering if this all didn't have to do with him getting his top front teeth in--the second one finally broke through the gum yesterday. Perhaps this made it uncomfortable for him to eat from the bottle? Curious.
    7 replies | 332 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    April 26th, 2017, 05:47 PM
    Hi binu. Teething may cause fever, however only a very low fever. If your baby actually has a fever of more than F 100.5, your baby is most likely ill. An ill baby is going to be less likely to want to eat. Teething might cause a baby to not want to eat, in which case you probably just want to respect that they are not feeling well and do not want to eat! But at 7 months there are many other reasons a baby would be uninterested, the most common being they are simply not ready for solids yet, or would prefer to feed themselves. The recommendation for solids is that they are introduced at about 6 months. Not that baby actually eat anything. If someone is telling you it is a problem if your 7 month old is refusing to eat solids, they are incorrect. Unless there is some physiological issue, you probably have nothing to worry about, and any physiological issue with taking in food would probably have shown itself before this as a nursing problem. Has your baby been gaining slowly? Is baby currently breast or bottle fed and how is that going? An excellent book I strongly suggest is the book My Child Won't Eat by the pediatrician and breastfeedng expert Carlos Gonzalez. It is not going to give you ideas for making a child eat who does not want to, it explains normal growth patterns and eating habits for babies and young children, and helps parents understand that usually they are worrying over normal behavior as well explaining what actually might indicate a true...
    1 replies | 185 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    April 26th, 2017, 05:36 PM
    Short nursing sessions of just a couple minutes for a 7 month old are entirely normal. Long nursing sessions when baby wishes are also entirely normal. How much a baby actually takes in during each individual feeding is normally going to vary tremendously. Like anyone else sometimes babies prefer a smaller meal than other times. A "full" feeding is a feeding of any length that baby chooses to end because baby is done. They may wish to nurse again shortly, but that is again, normal behavior. Any baby past the first few months usually has a great deal of control over how much they take in when they nurse and how fast, so it may even be that the baby is not getting much more milk at the longer sessions than the shorter. Distractibility is also common at this age, but sometimes I wonder how much of that is true problematic distractibility where baby really needs help such as a dark room in order to get enough to eat, and how much is mom expecting baby to nurse some certain amount of time when they nurse, and worrying if they do not do that. In other words what you both are describing is usually normal and nothing to worry about. If a baby is not gaining normally, or nursing so infrequently it is unlikely they could be getting enough (Less than 6-8 times in 24 hours) then that is a problem. If baby is refusing to nurse at all for longish periods, that is a problem or may become one (because it might develop into a nursing strike) But snacking is normal and not a...
    2 replies | 180 view(s)
  • @llli*norajsmama's Avatar
    April 26th, 2017, 04:32 PM
    We are having the same problem! My daughter will be 7 months old in 2 days. The only thing that helps us is feeding in a quiet room. Like your son, she eats well when asleep. I think she does most of her eating at night. As long as he is gaining enough weight the short feeds are ok. Does he nurse a lot at night? In our case it's OK with me for now because we bedshare and she is very easy to sleep and nurse with. I have heard of some people nursing down for naps and then right upon waking up from naps when he will be drowsy.
    2 replies | 180 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    April 26th, 2017, 01:23 PM
    If it were me I would try nursing him down. If he is sleeping from 10-3 without waking, that may be all he can do at this age. 5 hours of unbroken sleep is sleeping "through the night" according to the official definition. What about snack or water? Sometimes kids this age really are just hungry overnight. I kept snacks by the bed when trying to night wean. Could it be, he has to pee or poop and is perhaps not wanting to go in the diaper? I would also suggest just look at what might cause general sleep disturbance. Is he too hot, too cold, not enough light, too much light, too much noise, too little noise, too much overall screen time, or screen time too close to bed time. My kids are all getting their seasonal allergies right now, and that can cause more restless sleep. As could just a cold or congestion. Very rarely, a food intolerance might cause very broken sleep.
    10 replies | 1018 view(s)
  • @llli*binu's Avatar
    April 26th, 2017, 12:00 PM
    So my baby is nearly 7 months and is exclusively breastfed. He refuses the bottle even if it's breast milk. When he is awake, he only drinks for approximately 3-5 minutes at a time before getting restless. He seems to want to snack all the time. However, he feeds really well when he is asleep but I can't keep making him sleep in order to feed him . He also does not want solids... How can I get him to drink a full feed instead of a few sips?
    2 replies | 180 view(s)
  • @llli*binu's Avatar
    April 26th, 2017, 11:56 AM
    My baby is nearly 7 months now. He is teething really badly and in constant pain, he also gets alot of fever... I started him on cereal at 6 months. He always clinches his jaw shut not wanting to eat, he also spits out whatever is in his mouth OR he just keeps it on without swallowing. I usually give up after a while as he starts to cry. He doesn't even end up having a Tablespoon. Any advise? It's so fraistrating and I'm worried about his growth...
    1 replies | 185 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    April 26th, 2017, 10:22 AM
    Hi and welcome. Yes it is possible to increase milk production at any point, generally speaking. But it depends on why mom has low milk production and also on what she is able to do. Before I try to get into your questions, I have a few... baby is just now 2 months (8 or 9 weeks) old? Or older? Are you working with an IBCLC? Or did you in the past? How did that go? Did they have you do any before and after nursing weight checks? If so, when was this and what were the numbers? Have you read the book Making More Milk? If so, are you using any ideas from it, and do you find them helpful? What kind of a pump are you using? Are you sure it fits properly and is in excellent working order? How many ounces of breastmilk and formula total does your baby consume each day, and how much breastmilk do you pump each day? How many times a day do you pump and what is the yield per session about (just give the range.) How many times a day does baby nurse? How many time a day does baby get a bottle and how much at a time (again give the range.)
    5 replies | 304 view(s)
  • @llli*angelreeve's Avatar
    April 26th, 2017, 10:17 AM
    Update: I started the nightweaning process a week ago. It has helped increase his first stretch to five hours relatively easily. The problem is he wakes up at around 3:00 AM and it takes 2 hours to get him back down!! He tries to go back to sleep, he flops around and switches beds (we have two queen beds on the floor) but he just can't settle. He asks for boov now and then but doesn't cry too much. I don't now what to do. Has anyone experienced this? If this continues I may just give him boov at 3:00 AM but I'm not convinced that will get him back down to sleep either.
    10 replies | 1018 view(s)
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