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  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:41 PM
    Wow honey this has not been your year. I am so sorry for your loss. So, you had a baby, you all got sick, you broke your ankle, your dad dies suddenly...and you moved house...all in the space of a few months? Wow. Well, if anyone looks at you cross-eyed about bottles you have my permission to pour it over their head! I think your plan sounds good. I think there are many things that may have caused the decrease, but usually there is really only two main ways to make it increase, and that is frequent and effective milk removal and galactagogues. (And do not forget hydration!) I do not know what a low carb diet does, I suppose that is for the PCOS? I once saw a talk on PCOS at a lactation conference and the person said fish oil (like you take as a supplement) is helpful, but I forget why. The thing about upping production with milk removal is to do it as often as you can, meaning, as often as you can that works for you. From what I have read about it, frequency of milk removal is more key in increasing production than is how "empty" the breast is made, but that is important too. That is why moms are told to pump after nursing. But that is just not a convenient time to pump for many moms, or mom does not have time to pump until no more milk is coming etc. So, that is not the only choice. In other words sometimes it is better to pump when most convenient so that you can pump more often, even if those sessions are short. The book Making More Milk has many tips for...
    5 replies | 84 view(s)
  • @llli*jhart's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:06 PM
    Yes, I think the stress from the ankle must have triggered the unusually long mastitis. Also the whole family was recovering from norovirus, so just generally I was feeling off my game. And then about two weeks after the mastitis, my father died unexpectedly. The baby and I went home for the funeral. I didn't take the pump with me but should've because that's when the formula supplementation really took off. It wasn't until I got home again, fully a month after the mastitis, that I was able to start trying to build my supply again. Talking to the IBCLC today, it sounded like it may have just been too long between when my supply first dropped and when I started pumping. No one is treating me for PCOS. We've recently moved. So my current plan is: - low carb diet - try to get hold of some domperidone, which the IBCLC suggested - continue pumping - try this approach for three or so weeks and then reevaluate
    5 replies | 84 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:54 PM
    Ha ha, yes, I get it. Ok you broke your ankle? Goodness. I cannot even imagine! I wonder if the stress of that could also have played a part? I only had mastitis with one of my kids, (but three times) the first time I also thought I got through it without antibiotics and then a few days later, wham. Sometimes to recover the body needs more help. If you feel fully recovered no reason to worry about it now, I am just thinking for the future. I get wanting to avoid abs of course. Who is treating you for the PCOS? maybe it would help to get tested now to see if the issue is likely to be hormone related. You would need a doctor to prescribe a pharmaceutical galactagogue. I think most moms get them from their ob but any doctor could prescribe. Unfortunately many will not. But it depends on where you live and on your doctor. If you want to learn more about this here is a little info, and you can research more as you like: http://www.breastfeedingonline.com/reglan.shtml#sthash.DvHtOaxN.dpbs
    5 replies | 84 view(s)
  • @llli*jhart's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:39 AM
    Hi Maddie, thanks so much for this response! I did see an LLLL a month ago and am seeing an IBCLC today. Regarding social circles, I guess I mean more the people who haven't heard my story but would see me with the bottle. I can't say to everyone I meet, "Let me tell you about my tuberous breasts and mastitis!" you know? I'm trying not to stress about it. Regarding the mastitis, I've gotten it once with each of my kids and never taken antibiotics. I take the baby to bed for three days and that's that. What happened this time is I broke my ankle, and had a day or two where I didn't eat. The mastitis started a few days after that. It cleared after three days as usual but the inflammation continued and migrated around my breast as I said. I massaged whatever area was inflamed in order to promote blood flow. It did hurt when I was massaging, but I didn't think I was doing damage. Aside from the duration of the inflammation, nothing seemed unusual at the time. The more I think about it, the more I think it may be hormonal related to PCOS. I do feel that my estrogen level is back up. I'm going to try low-carbing it. I don't even know who I would go to to get a pharmaceutical galactagogue.
    5 replies | 84 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:19 AM
    Ok thanks! Please keep us updated.
    10 replies | 260 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:24 AM
    deja I can tell you are very frustrated. Here are my thoughts. Moms are warned about nipple confusion because it is a real thing- bottles interfere with breastfeeding for several reasons. And some of these reasons are not about bottles at all but about the fact of baby getting supplements in any form. However, I think these warnings are causing you to think that because your baby got bottles, and baby is not nursing, this means bottles ruined everything and now your baby will never nurse. I would suggest there is no reason to think this. A baby this young who will not nurse has not forgotten how. Nursing- or at least the impulse to try to nurse, is instinctual, and your baby's instincts would not be erased this quickly. When a baby this young is not latching, or having an extremely hard time latching, or latches but will not nurse normally, while bottles/supplementing may be playing a part, most of the time the fact is baby CANNOT latch and nurse normally for some (usually entirely fixable) reason. In other words it is not that baby won't but that baby can't. This is consistent with the problem you were having in the first place, right? Baby could not latch normally so you had to start supplementing.
    4 replies | 174 view(s)
  • @llli*deja's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:26 AM
    At this point if she latches once a day after much struggle, it's a good day. It seems as if she's completely forgotten how to latch. She did root and open her mouth (not wide enough but still) and do the usual "steps", but now she doesn't do that anymore. She just opens her mouth a little bit and expects the bottle or something similarly firm and long without much effort on her part. Despite the preemie teat, the paced feeding, smaller portions and everything we've been doing, seems the bottle has done a lot of harm. As for nursing, most of the time she'll scream and complete refuse to even try, but on those times she is willing to give it a go, she'll try once or twice to latch and when it doesn't work, that's it. And on those rare occasions she will try and perhaps even catch the nipple, it'll be a struggle -my nipples are soft and just slip out of her mouth, she'll manage to suck in the nipple itself and not much more. I let down quite easily the first round now, so she'll suck something out that way too. And I let her, despite the bad latch, since that's the best I can get ATM. I tried a nipple shield but she can't even latch onto that. She doesn't know how to, what to do, the shield is quite large/wide, the "flaps" keep bending outward under the pressure of my breasts (not sure how to explain that) and it's just not going well. Trying a lactation aid is pretty much pointless at this point since she'll hardly latch at all, let alone getting a tube in through...
    4 replies | 174 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    June 24th, 2017, 10:10 PM
    Hi jhart, I am so sorry you are having this concern. Why do us women tend to feel shame over things we have no control over? Your friends surely understand that your baby needs nourishment and you are a wonderful mom for making sure your baby is nourished in a difficult and emotional situation. If they are shaming you, then perhaps you need a wider social circle. I suspect that most if not all of them may feel frustrated and unhappy FOR you because they know you would prefer to exclusively nurse your child, but are hopefully not judging of you. I am not sure if you can ever know exactly what happened to your "good breast," however, I think you may be able to get some answers if you read the book Making More Milk (if you have not already) and also I would suggest consulting with a board certified lactation consultant, if possible one who specializes in or is very experienced in low milk production. If you have already done so and not gotten the help or info you seek maybe you can see another. But here are some thoughts. When a mom gets mastitis, many times it indicates something was already not going quite right on the milk removal front. In other words the mastitis may not have been the origin of the problem that eventually caused low milk production, but instead a symptom of that problem. Mastitis itself is "just" an infection (albeit one that makes you feel like you have been hit by a truck) and is not likely to permanently damage a breast, anymore than a...
    5 replies | 84 view(s)
  • @llli*nivilovely's Avatar
    June 24th, 2017, 09:43 PM
    Oh I am sorry. I understood what you meant. Yes English is not my first language. But you are very clear. Thanks for your concern.
    10 replies | 260 view(s)
  • @llli*jhart's Avatar
    June 24th, 2017, 08:36 PM
    Hi, I am a SAHM and have EBFed three children. I have tuberous breasts and PCOS, although I am of normal weight. One breast produces very little milk but the other one is a decent producer. Two months ago I got mastitis and breast inflammation in the good breast that lasted about two weeks. I EBFed through it and for two weeks after it had cleared up. At that point, my supply still hadn't come back (as indicated by diapers, no let-down, no leaking, unhappy baby). I weighed my son and he was down a pound. A three-month old shouldn't be losing weight, so I started pumping and supplementing with formula. I've been pumping 4-6 times a day with a Medela Symphony (in addition to nursing) and supplementing for about six weeks now and the supply in my good breast is still down. It is producing no more than the bad one and together it's not enough. I'm producing about 0.6 oz per hour. With my first child, when I pumped after three hours, I would get 1 oz out of the bad breast and 3 oz out of the good one. Now I'm getting 1 oz out of each. I'm taking the galactalogues that have worked for me in the past but no galactologue is going to double my production. I'm wondering what happened to my good breast. Was it damaged by the mastitis? Did clogged ducts cause pressure involution in some parts of it? Will my supply ever come back? Will it come back with another child? I remember the inflammation migrated around my breast. As soon as one area of tenderness cleared up, another...
    5 replies | 84 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    June 24th, 2017, 05:29 PM
    I think it is very smart to be prepared and I am happy to answer your questions, but I fear there may be a language barrier or something at work here because I keep getting the feeling my words are being misunderstood. I would never say be sure to not pump. If you need to pump you should, and even if you really want to pump, it is usually fine to do so. It is just not needed if all is going normally. If English is not your first language, the Womanly Art of Breastfeeding is published in many languages, and you may be able to find a Leader or LC who speaks a language you are more comfortable with. If the problem is that I am not being clear, I am sorry for that. I know I tend to write overly long and probably more detailed than needed explanations!
    10 replies | 260 view(s)
  • @llli*nivilovely's Avatar
    June 24th, 2017, 05:06 PM
    Thanks a lot for your responses. I will make sure I don't pump and feed the baby on cue. Once the baby is born I will know about the surgery. I am just being prepared. Thank you
    10 replies | 260 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    June 23rd, 2017, 10:17 PM
    I looked those both up in lactmed https://toxnet.nlm.nih.gov/newtoxnet/lactmed.htm and am not seeing anything about them affecting milk production- in fact there is just very little info at all. I suggest that on Monday you call infantrisk http://www.infantrisk.com/ and talk to someone on the phone, they may have more complete info for you. Giving these treatments sounds a bit time consuming and stressful. Make sure you are taking care of yourself especially watch that you keep well hydrated at all times. Low production could also be caused by baby not nursing very often or not effectively. If that is the case, increasing your overall milk output either by getting baby to nurse more often or by pumping (or both) may help. Here is a good overall article on milk production if you have not seen this yet: http://kellymom.com/hot-topics/low-supply/
    1 replies | 77 view(s)
  • @llli*jabez's Avatar
    June 23rd, 2017, 09:08 PM
    @llli*jabez replied to a thread SNS in Increasing Your Milk
    Thanks again, maddieb. I don't really intend to let my breast get hard as a rock and i don't know how. I cannot even single out the circumstances that makes it like that. I pump regularly, like every 3 hours at the office. At home, whether I feel like I have milk or not, my baby is at my breast. If I am able to stand up after she nurse at my breast at the wee hours of the morning, I pump. The LC said probably stress which I tend to believe because I read somewhere stress causes milk not to come out. Thanks thanks a lot! :)
    4 replies | 124 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    June 23rd, 2017, 07:54 PM
    @llli*maddieb replied to a thread SNS in Increasing Your Milk
    Ok. I guess it does not matter but usually tantrum refers to episodes of extreme screaming, hitting, kicking, basically loosing control by toddlers and preschoolers because they are uncomfortable for some reason (hungry, thirsty, tired, need to use the restroom) and/or because they do not get their way over something. Like they wanted a toy or to not get in the car seat or not leave the park or whatever. When a baby cries and cannot be comforted no matter what you do, typically we say that baby is colicky, or it might be baby is in pain like from an earache or tummy pain or something. Colicky would be indicated if this happened once or more a day for more than a certain number of weeks (I forget how many,) If this happened one time, pain would be my best guess. I certainly understand being happy baby is satisfied! But unfortunately, letting your breasts get even a little full is not good for milk production. Letting breasts get rock hard or develop lumps is terrible for milk production and also puts mom in a situation where she may become very ill with a breast infection. So this is not a great state of affairs I fear. Your 5 month old baby should not need a hard breast to nurse effectively and get enough milk. Very few mothers ever experience hard, very full breasts at 5 months, yet their babies get plenty of milk and nurse fine. I think something else may be going on, but I have no idea what. I would strongly suggest having a consult with a lactation...
    4 replies | 124 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    June 23rd, 2017, 07:35 PM
    Ok. If your baby is with you and nursing, then you do not need to pump at all. Pumping is only needed if baby cannot nurse for some reason, or for some reason cannot nurse normally. If baby cannot nurse or is not with you, I think the recommendation is to start expressing milk within a couple hours of birth. Definitely do not wait until your milk comes in! You have to start expressing the milk soon after baby is born. Again hand expression usually works better, but you can also try pumping or do both. The point is to do what will work best for you. How long to pump? Probably longer than 10 minutes a side, more like 20 would be the ball park- but exactly how long is going to be totally dependent on how well your body responds to pumping or hand expression. Again no matter how you slice it, nursing is easier and more effective, so this is only for the situation of baby not being there to nurse or being unable to nurse normally. And again it is important to pump or hand express about 10 times in 24 hours, not that it necessarily be every 2 hours. A baby nurses in clusters, it is ok to cluster pump too. Again, it depends on what works best for you. As carm3 has explained, the first few days mom produces colostrum, and this substance can be thought of as the first milk or early milk. It is thicker than the later milk, this is one reason why hand expression often works better than a pump if milk expression is needed. It is a remarkable substance but there is not a lot of...
    10 replies | 260 view(s)
  • @llli*danielst15's Avatar
    June 23rd, 2017, 07:33 PM
    My 7 mo son has been needing nebuizing treatments of Albuterol and Budesonide multiple times a day for a couple months now. I have noticed a dramatic drop in supply around this same time. Can either of these drugs cause a drop in my supply? My son wont keep his mask on, so we hold it in front of his nose, so I inhale a lot of it.
    1 replies | 77 view(s)
  • @llli*carm3's Avatar
    June 23rd, 2017, 02:50 PM
    There won't be any milk in the very beginning - you'll have colostrum, a thick substance that gives baby all he needs at first. Your milk should, with adequate stimulation, come in between 3-5 days. Until then, it is 100% normal for baby to feed very often - this is what in fact gives the message to your body to produce milk. They have extremely tiny tummies, and colostrum and breastmilk are both digested very quickly. A common thing that's tossed around is 'my milk didn't come in so they made me give my baby formula right away,' but that's something that just sets you up for failure. Newborn babies should not need to be 'settled down with formula' unless mom is choosing not to breastfeed or mom/baby has medical issues that preclude them from nursing (in which case pumping as you're planning is often a do-able alternative).
    10 replies | 260 view(s)
  • @llli*nivilovely's Avatar
    June 23rd, 2017, 12:38 PM
    I have one other question. Once the baby is born. When I try to breastfeed and there is little or no milk? And the baby is crying because he is hungry. Would it be ok to give formula to settle the baby down? This happened to my friend. So I would like to know.
    10 replies | 260 view(s)
  • @llli*nivilovely's Avatar
    June 23rd, 2017, 12:31 PM
    Thanks for your fast reply. Doctor said he could do it even before we leave the hospital or it can even wait a month or so. Once the baby is born we will know. Say once the milk come in on 3rd day. Do you want me to pump all the milk every two hours? 10minutes both breasts every two hours should be good or no? I would like to be prepared. That's why I ask these questions. As far as I know there is no reason for immediate separation from baby once he is born. He may go for scans now and then, I think that is doable. I am just worried only about the surgery.if it's possible I will ask them to hold it until at least a month. Or 10days. About feeding with a open cup that's what I was thinking too. I will make sure that he is not given any bottle.
    10 replies | 260 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    June 23rd, 2017, 12:08 PM
    If there is no compelling medical reason for the surgery to happen in the days immediately following birth then I would strongly suggest wait as long as you possibly can medically speaking. The minutes hours days and weeks immediately following birth are vitally important for getting breast-feeding off to a good start any separation of mother and baby can throw a wrench into things. Not to mention the stress on both of you of surgery happening directly after birth. But sometimes life doesn't go as planned and it always helps to have a back up plan. If you and your baby are separated for any more than two hours then you should pump or hand express. In the early days when milk production is normally low and the breasts soft, many moms find hand expression more effective than pumping. You would want to pump or hand express at least as often as baby would nurse and that would be at least every two hours, or at least 10 times in 24 hours it does not always have to be every two hours exactly for example you can pump more frequently for a while and then take a four hour break to sleep. Talk to the doctor and make sure they understand you want as little separation from your baby as possible and also that you want your baby fed your expressed breastmilk should baby need to be fed not at the breast at anytime around the surgery. As long as you're able to express enough breastmilk that is all baby should need. Line up a hospital grade pump for pumping.
    10 replies | 260 view(s)
  • @llli*nivilovely's Avatar
    June 23rd, 2017, 10:59 AM
    He assured us that he is going to be ok once he's born and no one would know that he has an issue inside. Without these ultrasounds we wouldn't even know about this issue at all . I really want to exclusively breastfeed him. Please help me out.
    10 replies | 260 view(s)
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