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  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 12:43 PM
    Isn't it possible your child is just ill? It's been known to happen. I would suggest call infant risk http://www.infantrisk.com/ (call today, it can take time to get someone) and also you can look up your abs here. https://www.nlm.nih.gov/news/lactmed_announce_06.html I have no idea why you are on abs, or what you are on, or what dose. but here is the way I look at it. Sorry if this offends anti- ab people. There are very good reasons to keep taking abs for the required course if needed. 14 days seems a tad long, maybe discuss your physician whether it is really needed in your case to take them that long. What if they were making you feel sick? If your child were given an antibiotic directly for an infection or to avoid infection, as of course, toddlers routinely are, and had mild adverse reactions like occasional vomiting and 'sick looking' poop and as a result are not feeling awesome, would the abs be discontinued? I think that is a question to research, or ask yourself, or ask your child's pediatrician. Because I am not at all sure the answer would be "yes." Some adverse reaction like this to abs is normal and basically the recommendation for mild reactions is to live with it. In your case, you know that the very low exposure to the abs you are taking that your baby has had or will continue to have, may have caused this mild sounding reaction. Maybe. So, you may want to be extra careful if baby is ever directly given abs. But I am not sure it means all...
    1 replies | 23 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 12:19 PM
    @llli*maddieb replied to a thread SNS in Increasing Your Milk
    Hi jabezz! So, I have seen lactation aids used fine for babies this age and even much older. toddlers even. However, that is no guarantee it will work well for you and your child. It is simply too individual a thing to predict. But I am confused about something. In my experience, babies do not "throw tantrums"/ When a baby cannot get enough to eat at the breast, baby may get frustrated, push on the breast, knead the breast, pop on and off, cry, etc. Is that what you mean? Those things can all be caused by other things, or just be normal fussy baby behavior. Or they can be due to a slow flow/not enough milk. But the best way to tell if a baby is really getting enough at the breast is by weight gain. Especially at this age, many babies seem distracted or not entirely happy nursing. It is kind of a thing. LLL calls it the "four month fussies" of course it can happen anytime, usually between 2 and 6 months.
    1 replies | 26 view(s)
  • @llli*mackeroo2013's Avatar
    Today, 11:47 AM
    I'm on antibiotics that have been prescribed to prevent infection. After 8 days of the 14 day rx, my 17 month old vomited once and has had several sick poops. She is acting a little under the weather. Dr. Thinks it may be from the antibiotics and she's exposed from nursing. I nurse my daughter about 6-7 times a day. Dr. Wants me to quit nursing and just pump. Daughter has never taken cow's milk, but also she nurses more for comfort. I am considering going off the antibiotics and sticking to my probiotics because I can't fathom keeping her from nursing for 5 days. I can't handle the thought of being abruptly taken from nursing. Any thoughts on this. People keep telling me "she's old enough to wean", but that's not the point. I want her to decide that. Help I'm so discouraged.
    1 replies | 23 view(s)
  • @llli*djs.mom's Avatar
    Today, 09:57 AM
    Also, from when to when are you at work?
    12 replies | 465 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 09:45 AM
    Ok well that is infuriating. My husband works for the government of our state and I know how regimented everything can be. But sometimes it just takes getting to the right person with a perfectly reasonable request, and gradually reducing frequency and length of pump sessions so your body can adjust is reasonable. I do not know if you are union or have a HR person you could talk to or what but just a thought. Frankly in my opinion what they are doing with holding the key hostage is already inappropriate as it invades your privacy as well as obviously not aligning with the spirit of the law once again. Also, gotta say as a taxpayer it would bother me if my tax dollars are going to micromanaging of a mother's pumping schedule! Nutty. Anyway, if you cannot pump at work anymore (or soon) I suggest have a plan in place to deal with any discomfort at work, and that would probably mean hand expressing in the bathroom, hopefully no need for a key in that case. Even if you were not able to save that milk, this would help protect your health as well as protect you milk production going forward. Yes of course it is true that your milk production is long established, and as long as baby is nursing with high frequency your production is likely to continue to meet baby's needs. But there is no way removing 3 milk expressions a day from your routine is not going to reduce production somewhat. How much and how much it matters depends on the individual situation. But reducing the number...
    5 replies | 115 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 09:25 AM
    I should have added, if the shield helps baby get a better latch. Sometimes the issue is something a shield is not going to help, but often they can help with baby not being able to latch effectively.
    2 replies | 75 view(s)
  • @llli*djs.mom's Avatar
    Today, 09:25 AM
    I'll come back and address the schedule later but in terms of teeth-teething is pain for babies and it's pain they aren't accustomed to. They absolutely comfort nurse more when they are teething because they get pain relief from the ocytocin in your milk. And whenever the night nursing increase to the point that the mother is resentful it usually IS teeth. Now, it's still totally normal for a baby to feed every 3-2 hours at night. But in terms of being able to tell or figure it out? Dose her at bedtime with Motrin. Right now it looks like she is sleeping a 4hour stretch between 6 and 10pm.Any 4-5hour stretch of uninterrupted sleep in a baby this young IS considered STTN. So if that is true? That she sleeps straight thru from 6-10 every night, She may not be in pain. If what's really happening is you just don't feed her until 10, what you are looking for with pain meds is longer actual sleep times. Because she would be getting the pain relief from the motrin rather than waking up and looking to you for pain relief.
    12 replies | 465 view(s)
  • @llli*jabez's Avatar
    Today, 06:39 AM
    @llli*jabez started a thread SNS in Increasing Your Milk
    Hello, My baby is almost 5 months and still supplementing. I never got my milk to be sufficient. I work during weekdays and spent my weekends breastfeeding my baby. I pump in the office every 3 hours and breastfeed my baby throughout the night. Although my baby doesn't throw tantrums for being hungry, I always feel that the milk she's getting is not enough. The only time I feel she's happy with the milk quantity she's getting is when I have mild cases of clogged ducts or I was not able to pump for like 4 to 5 hours. So, I want to address the weekend breastfeeding effort by buying SNS. Do you think it will still work now that she's 5 months old - she's so active and can now 'manipulate' my (.)(.). Like she can hold it and put in her mouth, etc. Recently, she will latch and use her hands to push herself away - end result is that she's on my nipple rather than my whole (.)(.). I would take her back from time to time and hold her hand instead so that it cannot move.. Thanks in advance for your inputs and insights.
    1 replies | 26 view(s)
  • @llli*ostowe's Avatar
    Today, 01:30 AM
    What happened after this - did you get your supply back? I stopped taking Reglan after just a week and now my supply is gone, will it come back, or is the only option to start the medicine again? It would absolutely break my heart to not be able to breastfeed anymore.
    1 replies | 1931 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 01:10 AM
    I agree with carm3. Just wanted to make a couple suggestions This is such a good question! Wouldn't it seem that if a mom makes enough milk, then baby should be able to get what they need at the breast? Yet so often moms pump and supplement with what they pump. Well, there is a case where a baby would need this even if mom makes enough, and that is if baby cannot (or for some reason cannot always) transfer milk very well, and the other is if baby does not nurse often enough. The milk transfer your LC measured was not terrible, but it was not quite the number that would be reassuring either. A baby who can transfer 1.5 ounces nursing 12 times a day is getting 18 ounces total, while a baby who is transferring 2 ounces nursing 12 times a day is getting 24 ounces. That is enough of a daily difference to make an impact on weight gain. So it would be nice to know how much baby is capable of transferring now and if there would be some way to increase that, if needed. Unfortunately how a latch looks is simply not definitive, also there is more to effective milk transfer than latch. The problem with not fantastic milk transfer aside slow gain is that over time, the not fantastic milk transfer causes milk production to reduce, obviously this would compound the initial problem. But of course if baby would nurse more often, then maybe baby would be able to get more milk that way and mom not have to pump. Yes at this age, many babies can nurse less than 12 times a day and get...
    4 replies | 102 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:59 PM
    Hi. Sorry I do not have time to respond longer but actually I do not have much to add. If you are managing to pump 8 times in 24 hours and feeding baby primarily your milk, then you are on track. All the other things you are doing are great. You and baby now need hands on help, so it is good you are going to get it soon. I would suggest ask the LC about tubing. No need to wait for the consult to ask a simple question. You could also try contacting jack newman via facebook or e-mail. You might not be able to find the tube you need locally but it should be available online. I think a lactation aid is a good idea however obviously if you can get baby nursing with out it and not needing supplements then you will not need it. Nipple shield might also help, obviously there are drawbacks but if you cannot get baby to latch and nurse effectively that would at least improve that situation and a nipple shield is far cheaper than a lactation aid. Kellymom has a good article. http://kellymom.com/ages/newborn/nb-challenges/wean-shield/ Hang in there! it is early days and you have every reason to think this situation can get turned around. You have done amazing getting your production up with the issues you were/are having with letdown and engorgement. You are on the right track. the ideas here esp. for instant reward might help http://kellymom.com/ages/newborn/nb-challenges/back-to-breast/
    2 replies | 75 view(s)
  • @llli*carmenoct24's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:09 PM
    Hi DJs mom, I modified my schedule after maddieb indicated that I could have problems with supply with so many hours without feeding or pumping. A typical day looks like this (at night I don´t try to manage the time of feedings, I just think "ok, she just ate, she cannot be hungry or wow it´s been awhile she probably really is hungry)": 8am breastfeed 11am solids (if she doesn´t want it, then formula or expressed breastmilk) 2pm espressed breastmilk or formula. If I am able to come home I breastfeed. If not, I pump. 4:00pm snack 5:00pm breastfeed 6:00pm breastfeed/sleep 10pm breastfeed
    12 replies | 465 view(s)
  • @llli*deja's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:02 PM
    Hello everyone DD was born 10 days ago and we've been having breastfeeding problems from the start. After a horrible experience we both suffered through during birth, she latched and nursed, not a great latch but not as bad as it was with DS. After that it went downhill. The latch was bad no matter what I tried, she was hungry, nervous, I was in really bad shape and to fast forward a few days, she was being bottle fed formula with nursing in between. My breasts got engorged on the third day but no milk was coming out, no more than drops at a time. I massaged, jot showers, expressing, hand pump...no use. The were painful and firm but no milk was coming out. That day we were being released from hospital and because of other complications I won't get into after the morning I wasn't able to do anything about my breasts until evening, aside from some brief nursing sessions. When we got home I hooked up my electric pump and started pumping and massaging. Next day it was a better, the second day they were soft and pain free again. But through all that, no milk, still drops. So the next few days I concentrated on getting my breasts up and running and slowly, bit by bit was able to eliminate the formula and am now bottle feeding expressed milk. Supply is still not where I want it to be, but I"m getting there.
    2 replies | 75 view(s)
  • @llli*julienne02's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:36 PM
    Thanks for the replies. I work for the government, and they are very much about the letter of the law, so I do not see them being accommodating at all, unless I were to get a doctor's note demanding they let me...when I was pumping for my second child I was able to use a room for which I had a key, and I pumped for 14 months though I was given pressure from the management to pretty much quit as soon as possible after a year. He was also slow to eat solids. Now, with my third son, the designated room has its own special key that is kept in the supervisor's office and I have to get it every time I need to use the room and then return it. So they basically know every single time I pump. I don't think it is coincidence, either...it seems they think that pumping after a year is unnecessary and taking advantage, of what I do not know. All the supervisors are either older unmarried women, or men, so I wouldn't expect to garner much sympathy from any of them. I don't think it is a fight I want to pick with them. It is so ridiculous that it is amusing to me, but anyone who uses the "lactation room" has to keep an Excel spreadsheet log of what time of every day we use the room, and send this spreadsheet every quarter to one of the human resource people. My little one sits with us at every meal, I give him one or two things that he can eat, and he is willing to put his tongue on lots of things to taste them (while I hold it for him) but hasn't shown any interest in eating...
    5 replies | 115 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:54 AM
    Oh ok. got it, sorry. Yes, in most cases that would be too little. Please understand I am not saying your baby is getting too little to eat overall. Assuming baby is gaining normally that means she is getting enough- right now, or up to this point. And in some cases that would continue to be true, because some moms have a very high breast "storage capacity" and in those cases baby gets a large meal whenever baby nurses and mom does not get very full between nursing sessions (the full feeling tells the body to reduce production.) But it is still "better" overall if a baby nurses more often in almost every case...In fact cannot think of a reason it would not be. Here is why. A baby nursing more frequently prevents mom getting uncomfortably full, and promotes continued normal milk production longer term. Also the more a baby nurses for other reasons than food (nurses to sleep, nursing for comfort) the longer the breastfeeding relationship continues. When you hear about babies who stopped nursing against mom's wishes, especially when it happens before a year, in most cases those babies were nursing on the lower side of normal frequency before they started refusing to nurse. To look at it another way, your 3 month old is "eating" 6 times a day. So where are you going to go from there? The average 3 year old also eats 5 or 6 times a day. I think ONE 6 hour sleep stretch or even a little longer with no nursing in 24 hours is fine for many babies, as long as their...
    3 replies | 108 view(s)
  • @llli*djs.mom's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:48 AM
    I don't know if your schedule has changed since you originally posted? But I will say that I am worried about you only breastfeeding 6 times in a 24hour period if your goal is at least a year. I am a huge fan of supplementation when it's used to allow a dyad continue to breastfeed, but giving your breasts stimulation less than 8 times in a 24hour period seems it could end up being a huge problem even if it doesn't seem like it now. So to that end, I would encourage you to allow a little bit more night nursing than 3 sessions in the 12hour period between 6:30pm and 6:30 am. Especially since it sounds like your baby is either playing catch up, which you need her to do to maintain your supply or she is experiencing something that requires milk to relieve pain. Now, nothing you wrote in your schedule suggest that she is eating every hour or all night. But as someone who co-slept continually from birth, I can tell you that when that DID occur? Actual eating every 45minutes to an hour? There was a reason. It was either teething pain or ear pain. Anytime the baby wants to night nurse to the point of resentment on the part of the mother? It's usually teeth. However, earpain can also do it and the way you talk about her doing better when laying on you and on her stomach makes me wonder if she is experiencing ear pain when flat on her back. I would have her pedi look at her ears so you can rule that out. If you feel like 3night feedings is the absolute most you can manage, then please...
    12 replies | 465 view(s)
  • @llli*djs.mom's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:28 AM
    Mostly you can depend onyour body producing enough after the year point because your supply is established. And honestly most women are ready to begin pump weaning at the year point. And that usually can happen in as little as 3 weeks, by dropping one pumping session a week, or as long as three months if you want to go more slowly. When I went back to work at the 14 month point, I went from nursing on demand to no pumping at all and continuing to nurse on demand while together and continued to nurse my son until he was 4.5 yrs old. But a major difference was that my son WAS eating solids whole heartedly by the year point so when I went back to work? He just drank water for the hours he was away from me and ate solid food. I don't know what exactly you are doing around solids and solids exploration but I want to encourage you to be diligent about including your child in meal time every night and giving the baby lots of choices. I also agree eith Maddie that you should get a doctors not saying that going cold tukey during the day could result in Mastitus and you missing work and that you be allowed to take at the very least a an extra month to pump wean. A lot can happen in the way of solids in 2 months if you are diligent about the ritual of meal time and lots of interesting choices.
    5 replies | 115 view(s)
  • @llli*butterfly111's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:25 AM
    Thanks so much for your help. Yes I've spoken at length with my midwife (who is a LC) and she is also stumped. We have agreed that I'll keep trying to get baby on that side, and pump whenever she refuses - hopefully that will keep the stimulation up on that side and it'll come right. Fingers crossed as it doesn't seem I can do much more than what I'm already doing. Thanks again for your suggestions and support
    4 replies | 198 view(s)
  • @llli*juniper's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:42 AM
    thanks a lot - I enjoyed particularly your "evolutionary" perspective on breastfeeding! However, there are some misunderstandings - I apologize for not being clear enough. You write "12 hours is a very long time for baby to not nurse". I would agree, but this is not my case! :) There have never been 12 hours between nursing sessions!! Baby feeds more or less regularly every 3 hours during daytime, and every 4-6 in the night. In the evening she breastfeeds around 18:00 - often for quite a long time - and then again around 21:00. The problem is that in the last evening feed (at 21:00) my breast is often empty or not full enough, and therefore I have to give her also the milk that I hand expressed earlier in the morning (if not, she would cry for food). Then, we both go to sleep, and she eats again without any problems around 03:00, 09:00, 12:00, 15:00, 18:00.... until 21:00, when we enter in the same issues as the evening before. Note that I don't use any "seep lengthening techniques" - baby always decides when she's hungry, day and night. I do not use pacifiers, and she sleeps in "babybay original" cot attached to our bed in the night, and naps in a crib in the living room in the day. The bottle I give her in the evening is not aimed at making her sleep longer in the night, but only at giving her what she wants/needs, as by evening time (21:00) my breast does not provide the milk she wants/needs (by that time often I have only 40-50 ml left). I should mention that I...
    3 replies | 108 view(s)
  • @llli*carm3's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:46 AM
    Ok, so 8-12 sessions is probably in the normal range (it's usually 10-12 for newborns and then down to 8-10 after that, IIRC). Did you supplement 3 bottles on top of that though? It would seem to me that if you're only getting 3-4 oz combined when pumping but she transfers 1.5 oz or so per feed, that if you replaced those pump sessions with actually nursing it would work out to the same thing. I'm impressed that you find the time to pump 3x/day as it is! Have you considered talking to your doctor about a prescription for domperidone? Dr. Newman has a good page about it https://www.breastfeedinginc.ca/informations/domperidone-getting-started/ Just to make sure, are you using any hormonal birth control? That can affect supply too. In terms of weight...it is tricky when you've just got a tiny person on your hands, but I think you've got to look at the whole picture. Is she meeting milestones otherwise? Is she overall a happy baby? A constantly starving baby would logically not be very happy! Is she very active (I know at 3 months that's a relative term, lol). Alert? It certainly sounds like her poop output is pretty good - a baby that isn't even getting enough to grow certainly doesn't have extra to cluster poop like that! I think a visit to the LC to do a weighed feed might really help to put your mind at ease. Especially if she can help you come up with a plan for pumping/weaning from pumping that will ease things a bit for you. Good luck mama!
    4 replies | 102 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    June 20th, 2017, 11:58 PM
    Hi, I do have a couple suggestions. Can you talk to your employer about the fact that you will need to wean from pumping or risk discomfort or even possibly serious illness? It is a medical fact. If you are pumping 3 times a day at this point you cannot suddenly stop pumping at all on his birthday! Milk production does not work like that. You would want to gradually reduce the number and length of your pump sessions so that your milk production can gradually ramp down. How long exactly it would take to reduce your production safely is not knowable. You might also explain to your work that since your baby is not eating much in the way of solids, you need to continue to provide your milk for him in order to protect HIS health. No need to tell them you have milk in the freezer. Frankly you should be able to get doctors notes to back up both of the above, but that depends on the doctor. It sounds like you workplace is determined to stick to the letter of the law rather than the spirit. 1 year was written into the law because so rarely do mothers intend to pump beyond that and they pump wean earlier. But it is not like one year is some magic number.
    5 replies | 115 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    June 20th, 2017, 11:42 PM
    The No-Cry Sleep Solution is appropriate at any age. There is another volume called The No-Cry Sleep Solution For Toddlers and Preschoolers but the original should be fine for you. However it is not a sleep training book...it offers multiple suggestions for helping baby sleep longer and you can try the ones that sound good to you and leave the rest- and I am pretty sure nothing it suggests would be problematic in terms of baby being able to nurse enough. As far as what is normal for an 8 month old-unfortunately the range of normal for overnight nursing at this age and beyond is very wide, and actually what you are experiencing could be entirely normal, and just who your baby is, or who your baby is right now. But no, that does not mean your baby needs to nurse every hour to get enough to eat. If you want to learn more about what we know about infant sleep (including very clear and non-admonishing information on SIDS) I suggest the book Sweet Sleep. It also has many tips on getting more sleep for any age baby/young child. Not being comfortable lying flat on back is a sign of GERD as is wanting to nurse very often (because breastmilk is soothing.) Of course these do not necessarily mean GERD for sure but they are fairly common"symptoms." Spit up need not be present for baby to have GERD. Ask Dr. Sears has a pretty good article on GERD.
    12 replies | 465 view(s)
  • @llli*mohawkbaby's Avatar
    June 20th, 2017, 07:19 PM
    Yes, I answered all those questions in my lost post! So sad it disappeared, I was typing one handed, it took forever oh well... Sorry if this isn't too coherent I'm holding a baby at a stand up desk now. I counted yesterday and I nursed 12 times in 24 hours, a few of those were not real eating sessions just needed help falling asleep or a quick snack, but at least 8 of them were genuine feedings. She is not a good sleeper, although she has just started going 4 hours at night. I saw a LC around 6 weeks and the baby had transferred a little more than 1 and a half ounces during our visit. I was told to go home and power pump once a day and pump when I could on top of that. I did this for a week and went back and the baby transferred just under 1 and a half ounces. Tried Fenugreek and blessed milk thistle for about 6 weeks, but didn't feel like it was changing anything, so I gave up on it, also ate oatmeal and barley, and lots of other things claimed to help milk. About 2 weeks ago I tried goats rue and that was when my left breast started producing almost as much as my right, but I also started using a different pump a little before that, so I don't know which was helping. I was using a new madela pump in style advanced. My sister in law le me borrow an older madela lactina select, it is much more efficient, and way more comfortable. I didn't find anywhere that rents scales near me, the lady at the hospitals breastfeeding store looked at me crazy when I asked. It...
    4 replies | 102 view(s)
  • @llli*carmenoct24's Avatar
    June 20th, 2017, 06:40 PM
    Thanks for the replies! Things are going pretty well. I nurse on-demand when I am home (and exclusively on the weekends). During the week I pump at lunch, but am not stressing about how much I pump or don´t pump. Currently, she averages one 3oz feeding of formula per day. I am usually gone for two feedings. Today I didn´t have to give her formula, she had expressed breast milk and solids as her two meals. WRT food, sometimes she eats enough for a meal and sometimes she isn´t into it. I do a mix of baby food and baby led weaning and don´t ever give her more than one meal of baby food per day, with no plans to up that quantity anytime soon. I feel like that is a good compromise for me. I am not near as stressed, but I am also maintaining my supply for a long term breastfeeding relationship. WRT sleep... She goes down easily (I nurse her to sleep). It´s the waking up after that that is killing me. In terms of laying on top of me, this week she has been okay if I lay her on her stomach - sometimes, even though it only lasts maybe an hour and she is up again. I know I´m not supposed to do that, but she has no other SIDS risk factors and ever since she started waking up so much, she doesn´t like sleeping on her back. I don´t have a pediatrician appointment for another month, but when I go I will ask about GERD. I looked it up and she doesn´t seem to have any symptoms. She used to throw up alot, but at about 6 months, she stopped and even then she was never bothered by throwing...
    12 replies | 465 view(s)
  • @llli*carm3's Avatar
    June 20th, 2017, 06:02 PM
    How many times/day are you nursing? You say you're nursing all day long - by 3 months I think you should start being able to feel less like you're so tied down, you know? It makes me wonder if there's an issue with milk transfer like tongue tie or something. Have you seen a lactation consultant at all? Especially if you made enough milk in the past to nurse your previous children, I would think you'd be able to make enough now. Have you tried any herbal galatagogues? I don't have any experience with them personally, but I've heard of people having some success with Fenugreek. I suspect that there were probably some important details in the post the internet ate! Looks like her weight gain is a bit on the slower side, right? Is her doctor concerned? Theoretically if baby is transferring milk well, you should be able to just nurse instead of pumping and giving that. Maybe you could try cutting out one pump session at a time, keeping a careful eye on diaper output? I'm not sure I'd really want to shake things up just yet though, until you figure out if she's transferring enough. I know you can rent an accurate scale to do weigh-feed-weigh to see how much she's transferring in a given nursing session, and that's something you'd also have done at an LC appointment. Last question is about the pump you're using. Are your parts (valves and membranes) worn out at all? That can decrease pump output. And also I've heard of moms having a lot more success increasing their supply...
    4 replies | 102 view(s)
  • @llli*mohawkbaby's Avatar
    June 20th, 2017, 04:42 PM
    I wrote another long winded post with lots of details about my situation, but the internet ate it when I tried to post it, and I don't have time to re-write it. So a much shorter post... I have been pumping about 3 times a day, trying to increase my milk supply. I have been giving that to my baby on top of nursing ALL day long, on demand. I usually pump 3-4 ounces total in those sessions combined. This is my 5th baby, (first 4 successfully breastfed) she was born on 3/14 (now 3 months old), 41 weeks gestation, weighing 6lbs 6oz, on 6/15 she weighed 9lbs 1oz. My question is...
    4 replies | 102 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    June 20th, 2017, 03:31 PM
    Hi juniper, welcome to the forum. Congratulations on your baby. Many- probably most- mothers seem to have more milk production in the very late night and early morning and less in the late afternoon and evening. In other words this is the biological norm. I know of no way to change this, unless possibly (and theoretically) if you changed your entire schedule so you slept during the day and were awake overnight. I imagine this is not what you are wanting to do! Because it is so common, it is assumed that this pattern serves a biological survival purpose- and in fact the milk is available exactly when baby needs it in the appropriate amounts. Probably the purpose is that this situation keeps baby close to mom and nursing at the most vulnerable times of the day...evening and nights. (Such a survival strategy would have developed over hundreds of thousands of years when humans were nomadic hunter-gatherers and presumably the babies who survived and thrived were the ones kept very close to mom at all times.) A baby who holds onto mom and nurses and nurses all evening is likely to be held by mom as mom falls asleep. A mom feeling full in the middle of the night would cause her to pull baby close to nurse. Another possible cause may be more directly physical and to do with mom's body and milk production. The breast getting very empty is what tells the body to make more milk. When a baby cluster nurses in the evening, as is typical, baby is emptying the breast and...
    3 replies | 108 view(s)
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