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  • @llli*vedimama's Avatar
    Today, 03:04 PM
    Hi, thanks for replying. I can still feel a ball kind of lump inside the right breast. I am nursing from that side too, however i have to hand express for a few minutes to cause it to soften before i start nursing, else it feels little hard my lil one gags when starting to nurse. when i do hand express milk does flow and flows fast and sprays 4-5 ways. would this be called a plugged duct still? As i mentioned in the earlier post, pumping output from this side was low. I havent tried pumping again. It doesnt hurt while breast feeding but when i hand express i can feel the pinch. At night I avoid feeding from that side since it becomes full with the longer gap between night feedings. Any help to resolve the issue is appreciated
    26 replies | 2127 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 09:59 AM
    Actually I now recall this has been reported before. I think the culture of the particular institution may just be getting passed on by everyone connected with it. If the LC and midwife were from two different places, then I have no idea. Unfortunately what seems like a benign suggestion can cause so many issues. The results of OP can range from a bit of a bother to a serious health issues (for mom) so telling a mom to pump to build a stash is potentially dangerous. Also it implies that all moms will not be able to nurse their babies long term and so need to stash tons of milk in the freezer! Of course this is not true and even moms who will need a stash because they are going back to work only need enough for the first day, plus a "cushion."
    5 replies | 171 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 09:49 AM
    great. I suggest bring pump to the consult as well, as she can give you tips on that. Most IBCLCs are also very familiar with alternative feeding methods (such as bottles) and so she may have ideas on that for you and your caregiver as well. Since the reduced rate of gain happened well prior to baby moving to the crib, it was obviously not caused by that. On the other hand, usually the simplest method to improve weight gain is to increase nursing frequency. If you are liking that longer sleep stretch the crib is giving you right now (and who wouldn't) maybe you can find other times to encourage baby to nurse more. Also be aware that sleep patterns do change and sometimes sleep stretches get short again for periods of time. This is normal and not a reason to be more alarmed.
    5 replies | 98 view(s)
  • @llli*lllkaren's Avatar
    Today, 08:02 AM
    Thanks so much for the updates! Your experience may well be the a-ha moment for other moms to get their levels checked if they're seeing the same kinds of signs. I'm so glad to hear treatment is working and breastfeeding is going better! :gvibes
    17 replies | 1383 view(s)
  • @llli*lllkaren's Avatar
    Today, 07:53 AM
    It certainly sounds like you had plugged duct there. :huh I realize this post was from a couple of weeks ago, so hopefully the situation has resolved by now. How are you feeling?
    26 replies | 2127 view(s)
  • @llli*lllkaren's Avatar
    Today, 07:48 AM
    Welcome, destwards! I'm afraid your post got overlooked initially because it was attached to the end of an older thread. Sorry about that! Are you home with your little one now? How are things going?
    1 replies | 19 view(s)
  • @llli*lllkaren's Avatar
    Today, 07:23 AM
    With gradual weaning and no engorgement, you may not get any plugged ducts. If you hand express often, that's signaling to your body that there's still a demand, so your breasts will keep producing milk. I'd suggest not expressing unless you start feeling uncomfortably full, and then express just enough to ease the discomfort, or if you feel like you're starting to get a clog. Most moms can express a little bit of milk for months or even years after weaning. You mentioned you're pregnant? How far along? Most moms see their supplies decrease or disappear at some point during the first or second trimester, so hormones might take care of the problem for you.
    1 replies | 123 view(s)
  • @llli*ilikefood's Avatar
    Today, 02:29 AM
    Baby has not been great with bottles from the start (I had to try many many different bottles/nipples to find one he would actually take). The past week while away from he me will sometimes take a bottle when hungry but he does prefer the breast so in order to be fed caretaker is feeding him when groggy so he intakes enough milk. He was cosleeping and I would offer whenever he was stirring and nuzzling and it tended to be every 2 hours. Just started putting baby in the crib two days ago and he has been feeding after one 5 hour stretch then every 3 hours until the morning. But yes he does get easily distracted now that he is more aware of everything going on around him. I am not sure about his slow weight gain the only difference is that I went back to work and the first 2-3 weeks he didn't drink much during the day. The weight check was done by the same doctor on the same scale so I am assuming it's consistent and accurate. I will definitely contact a lactation consultant because I am worried about low production. Thanks for the info!
    5 replies | 98 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:11 PM
    Ok, for a 10 hour separation, a baby typically will take about 10-15 ounces. So it does not sound like baby is being overfed overall, or at least not by much. But 4-5 ounces sounds a little high for an individual meal. And I do wonder about them feeding baby mostly when he is groggy, that is a little strange, assuming he is a healthy baby and he will take a bottle when hungry, why are they doing that? If your caregivers are not following guidelines for bottle feeding a breastfed baby maybe you can instruct them on that. Here is more info: http://www.llli.org/docs/0000000000000001WAB/WAB_Tear_sheet_Toolkit/22_bfabreastfedbaby.pdf and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UH4T70OSzGs&t=43s 5 hours would be considered sleeping through the night. So, one 5 hour sleep stretch in 24 hours at this age is probably normal. If there is more than one that might be a sign baby could nurse more often. This is normal. Remember, especially if you are concerned about baby's gain, it never hurts to offer to nurse. Cue feeding does not mean wait until baby cues to offer to nurse, it means, nurse when baby is indicating they want and also, offer any other times you feel like it. A baby cannot nurse too often, and offering allows baby to decide yes or no, even when they are getting busy and distracted as they are waking up to the world as is typical at this age. Also at night, maybe try to avoid or do not adopt any sleep lengthening strategies, in order to gently encourage baby to nurse more...
    5 replies | 98 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:48 PM
    Yes I doubted you would want to add another session. If in 15 minute sessions you are getting more than baby needs, maybe you could reduce the session length slightly without adding another session. Here are a couple other thoughts. Could you hand express instead for part of the time or for one session a day? Another thought is, if you are pumping on the lowest setting and getting injured, maybe the issue is with the pump motor. This happens. Is your pump new or older? Can you contact the manufacturer and see if they have troubleshooting suggestions or a way to test the suction on your pump? Or can you try a different pump? Another thought is, assuming you are double pumping, maybe try single side pumping. I am wondering if you could get your breasts aligned more comfortably with the pump flange if you pumped one at a time.
    3 replies | 138 view(s)
  • @llli*ilikefood's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:34 PM
    Before I got mastitis I was pumping 4oz combined each time. Now I pump 1-3oz. This is barely enough for him because when he is bottle fed he usually drinks 4-5oz each time. I'm told he drinks between 12-16oz while I'm gone which is from 7am-5:30pm. Often times he won't drink a bottle awake unless he is very hungry so he is fed when he is groggy/sleepy a lot of the time. Should I have his caretaker only feed him when he's awake so he will nurse more from me when I get home? During the day he sometimes feeds every 2 hours sometimes every 4. During the night he can go 3-5 hours between feedings. Feeding times seems to change depending on the day. From his 3 month doctor visit he was 12lb 10oz and at the 4 month he was 13lb 5oz. His weight gain had slowed down. The main thing that changed was that I went back to work and he started bottle feeding. Dr suggested baby cereal after feedings to help his weight gain but I'd rather wait on any foods until he is a bit older.
    5 replies | 98 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:09 PM
    Can you explain why you think your milk production is now below normal levels? Many moms experience differences in pump output for many reasons, but it does not always mean a mom has low milk production. Also, if you made more than enough milk for your baby previously, it would be normal for milk production to decrease to enough rather than too much anytime after 6 weeks. Most moms notice this happening around 3-4 months. No. It is best to pump as often as you need to in order to be comfortable (not feeling full) and also to express the amount of milk baby is drinking from bottles each day. When you say baby is going longer between nursing sessions, what do you mean exactly? At this age a baby would still be typically nursing 8-12 times in 24 hours, although some babies nurse a little less often and it is fine. When a baby is bottle fed part of the day, in general you want to try to make sure that overall, baby is getting more from nursing than from bottles. So for example, if a baby gets 3 bottles a day, it would be great if baby nursed more than that, so like 5-6 times a day (or more.) When bottles are more common than nursing, baby may begin to become habituated to bottles and become reluctant to nurse.
    5 replies | 98 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:00 PM
    An IBCLC is the only professional who is trained in assessing and solving breastfeeding issues. So yes, I think it is most likely to be helpful to see an IBCLC. Breastfeeding issues are tricky, as you have discovered, and of course not every IBCLC is great and not every one is going to be the right fit for you. But you can say that about any profession. Here is an article about what a consult with a good IBCLC would basically consist of: http://www.cwgenna.com/lconsult.html Before hiring an IBCLC you can talk to her about her experience with the issues you are having, her methods, etc. Thrush classically presents as white blotches or patches that can be rubbed or gently scratched off, presenting as red or bloody underneath. Some babies just have a white tongue surface. I do not know if it is from milk or not, but in my experience it does not always just rub off. If you pump and bottle feed, of course be aware how carefully you would have to clean the pump, the bottles, the nipples, etc. Also be careful as several days of no nursing at all might lead to breast refusal. Also, if you are right and your baby has thrush that is going essentially untreated, what good is it going to do? I would strongly suggest seeing an IBCLC if that is at all possible before trying this idea. If you do not know how to find an IBCLC locally let me know.
    3 replies | 143 view(s)
  • @llli*ilikefood's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:37 PM
    Hello I have a 17 week old and I am nursing when I'm with him and pumping while I'm at work. I ended up with mastitis and a fever for 24 hours about 2 weeks ago. Mastitis was in my left breast and of course it's the one that produces the most. I power pumped and that worked to increase my supply but the next day it dropped again. Do I need to continue to power pump daily to bring my supply back up again? Currently on my 4 work days I pump at 6:30, 9:30, 12, 3:30. Then I nurse him as needed when I'm home. On my days off I normally don't pump but am wondering if I need to in order to increase supply. He is also going longer between feedings, do I need to adjust my pumping to match his new feeding schedule?
    5 replies | 98 view(s)
  • @llli*bear.mommy's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:22 PM
    Hello, thank you for all these helpful resources! Wow, this is not the kind of thorough attention I receive from Kaiser IBCLCs. Granted, I assume it's because of Kaiser mgmt, as you suggest, not because they are not inclined to care. I am seeing the one I liked best next week, but I will also look into meeting with a local LLL leader or another IBCLC. Re vomiting - the first time, LO was lying on his back, and the vomit shot up a few feet into the air then fell in an arc over onto me and the floor. Possibly could have been forceful spit-up--being a nervous FTM, I of course panicked and rushed him to urgent care. He was fine; the pediatrician thought he might simply be "overeating" (I didn't think it was possible for a BF baby to overeat). Your experience of mastitis is frightening! I'll be hyper-vigilant now and will keep the idea of a single pumping session in mind. First, I might try lecithin and keep massaging the breast. I found that vigorously massaging in the shower last night helped release more milk and soften my breast until I could feel some smaller lumps beneath my breast (the area where I always forget to check!). I know additional expression is not great for the OS, but it did seem to bring temporary relief after I got some of the smaller lumps out. Thank you again for your help and encouragement! I feel more confident in seeking additional treatment now.
    4 replies | 251 view(s)
  • @llli*snackycake's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:46 PM
    Thank you for the reply. I haven't seen an IBCLC, would that be helpful? I've been focused on seeing people who can prescribe us something, since none of the non-medical remedies are working. I know it's normal for babies to have a white tongue just due to eating milk all the time, but my understanding has been that if the white coating wipes off it's just milk, and if not, it's thrush. The coating on my baby's tongue will not budge when wiped. I can't think what else would be exposing me to it - I spend almost 100% of my time topless at this point since I'm home on maternity leave with the baby, so it wouldn't be a bra or nursing pads or anything like that. I don't think my obstetrician can prescribe Diflucan for the baby since he's not her patient, and I've tried arguing with his pediatrician to no avail. I'm considering switching to exclusive pumping for a few days to try to stop the back and forth cycle and see if we can both get sorted out. Otherwise I'm fresh out of ideas and hope.
    3 replies | 143 view(s)
  • @llli*bear.mommy's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:29 PM
    It's good to know I'm not the only one questioning why there's pressure to build a stash! I got the feeling this was the advice they give to all moms, which still doesn't explain why they encourage it in the first place... I'm hoping more frequent nursing does help. In the meantime, I've set up another appt. with an IBCLC next week and hope to get to the root of the breast pain! THANK YOU again!
    5 replies | 171 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:51 PM
    Hi and welcome. For pumping issues and supply issues I suggest look to the many excellent articles on this on kellymom.com as well as the book Making More Milk. Here are few general suggestions as well: Many moms find that pumping NOT on a schedule, just pumping enough times in a day (at least 8, typically) works better than pumping on a schedule. Pumping more often part of the day would also allow mom to get a bit of a longer sleep once a day, as a round the clock every 2-3 hours schedule would not. Even a hospital grade pump may not fit properly. Did you have help choosing the correct size flange? Sometimes other things go wrong with a pump. You can ask the people you rented it from if they can offer help troubleshooting your pump. Many moms find that adding hand expression to their pump sessions helps them extract more milk. Are you certain EPing is the best or only choice for your situation? Because pumps extract milk differently than baby does, it can be quite difficult to pump enough milk even when mom makes enough, it just depends on the situation.
    1 replies | 144 view(s)
  • @llli*jknicely's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:58 AM
    I'm a ftm. I started with breastfeeding but my son had issues with latching first which we fixed with a shield and then he just became a lazy feeder, on for an hour and hungry ten minutes after he came off. we decided to just pump to make sure he was getting enough. Since making the switch five days ago I am not producing enough. I am trying everything and haven't seen a drastic change. Here is what I've tried... Mother milk supplements Power pumping Hospital grade pump Pumping every 2-3 hrs Drinking enough water and eating I pump with him nearby Finally my doctor put me on reglan
    1 replies | 144 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:12 AM
    Have you seen an IBCLC? Is it possible you are being exposed some other way aside baby? White tongue is something that is actually common and not necessarily a symptom of thrush. So I wonder if baby might be clear, and that is not the way you are being re-colonized? Yes I know babies can be asymptomatic, I am just trying to troubleshoot a bit. Also I wonder if there may be something going on aside thrush? Some other issues might seem like thrush. I realize the fact you feel better after taking diflucan is an indication that it is thrush, however, that does not rule out the possibility something else is also going on. If you believe baby needs treatment with diflucan, can your doctor prescribe it or talk to the other doctors for you? You are of course right, obviously, thrush is a big deal because the pain can cause a mom to have to stop breastfeeding and this is harmful to her health and the health of baby. Obviously you have read Jack Newmans entire protocol for thrush and tried his suggestions? There may be other protocols you can try. Also, moms on here have reported contacting Newman personally to get his input. The book Breastfeeding Answers Made Simple has a longish entry on thrush that includes many details about how re-colonization might occur and precautions to take. An IBCLC or a LLL Leader may have this book and can share that info with you. I have not been able to find it online, but the author is Nancy Morhbacher and she has a blog.
    3 replies | 143 view(s)
  • @llli*snackycake's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:22 AM
    I would love some advice if anyone can offer it, as I'm truly at my wit's end. Apologies in advance for the length of this post. My baby and I have had thrush since he was 2 weeks old, likely because of the antibiotics I had to have during labor for GBS. He's now two months old, and after trying just about everything, we're not in any better shape than when we started and his pediatrician seems largely indifferent. The thrush is only on his tongue, and doesn't seem to bother him or cause any symptoms other than the clicking noise he makes when nursing. He's a chubby, healthy baby, which I gather is why the pediatrician can't be bothered to prescribe anything that actually works. What we've done for the baby: He was initially prescribed Nystatin, which we used for about 4 weeks and saw no improvement whatsoever. I tried swabbing his mouth with diluted GSE, but that must've burned him because on the second day or so he actually was in too much pain to latch on to the breast or even take a bottle, so had to be fed with a medicine dropper until he felt better. I used diluted GSE on my breasts at the same time, and it seemed to burn me or dry things out and make the pain worse - I have sensitive skin so this wasn't a surprise. I've had him sucking probiotic powder off my finger twice a day. I've swabbed his mouth with a baking soda rinse after each feeding, and then applied lemon juice. Doing this for a week also resulted in no improvement. We tried a three-day...
    3 replies | 143 view(s)
  • @llli*crr.2017's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:31 AM
    I really hate to add a pump I am pumping plenty to keep up with what she is eating at daycare. I only pump for 15 minutes a session. Unless there is still mill spraying out I'll continue to pump a little longer.
    3 replies | 138 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    May 25th, 2017, 11:48 PM
    If more than your nipple is getting pulled up into the flange, that probably indicates the flange is a little big. if the nipple is rubbing against the "tunnel" that usually means the flange is too small. Sometimes this can be corrected by being very careful about positioning your nipple when pumping and lubing the flange with olive oil or similar. It is possible that the larger flange is fine for early in the day, and then the smaller one for later when the breasts are typically less full. Some moms also need a different size for each breast. How possible would it be to add a pump session some or all days? maybe the problem is how long you are pumping each time. If you could pump more often, maybe you could pump the same amount of milk with shorter sessions.
    3 replies | 138 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    May 25th, 2017, 10:05 PM
    Wow, me neither! Why does your midwife or IBCLC care if you build up a stash? Wow. This is so not their job. If a mom needs to build up a stash for some reason and wants advice about how to do that safely, then they can and should offer that kind of advice if they are capable of doing so. But why are they assuming you need or want a stash...or the size or immediacy of it, or that to build one, you should pump every day? I just do not get it. Of course, you are correct- pumping over and above baby nursing is going to increase milk production. And the more often you pump, or the more that you extract when you pump, the more it will increase production. This is the most basic and rudimentary fact about milk production- more demand = more production. In the normal course of nursing, babies rarely if ever "drain" the breast. If a mom is making more than enough milk, as is actually pretty common, then of course baby will not take all that is in there. Baby takes what baby needs. The milk that is left in the breast tells the body, "hey, this much was not needed, so please start to make less." At the same time, if baby is nursing frequently, then while mom is not empty she is also not so full she is uncomfortable while the body figures out what is enough but not too much. This is why frequent nursing helps. Of course, some babies will not nurse enough and hand expression in that case is a good idea. However, most babies, if gently encouraged, will nurse more often. It...
    5 replies | 171 view(s)
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