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  • @llli*jollycat's Avatar
    Today, 02:09 PM
    Yes, that makes a lot of sense. Thank you!
    2 replies | 59 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 11:15 AM
    Hi erc45, welcome to the forum. You say your baby seems particularly fussy- are you comparing her to other children you have had? Were they breast or formula fed? Can you explain a little more what you mean? In my experience newborn babies are normally very fussy, and the baby who is not is the more unusual baby. Green is a normal poop color for many babies and "mucous" is, as far as I know, not proven to indicate allergy or any other issues at all. I am confused. Aside the poop look and newborn rash, was there some other problem- like slow gain? Or breastfeeding hurting you or not feeling right for you perhaps? What you are describing with the green "mucous" poops, baby acne, and fussy baby all sounds entirely normal to me and as long as baby was gaining ok and nursing comfortable for you, then I am not sure why you would think you had to give baby formula? Your baby's doctor told you baby was doing fine on breastmilk, and you are not finding there is any significant improvement with the switch to formula...right? So, I am not sure why you are not just tossing the formula and going back to nursing baby? It would be a lot easier than what you are doing now.
    1 replies | 37 view(s)
  • @llli*erc45's Avatar
    Today, 10:55 AM
    So long story short, baby girl has consistent green mucous poops with breast milk. She also seems like a particularly fussy baby. Only other symptom is flesh colored bumps all around her temples and forehead (could just be sensitive skin or baby acne). 2 week checkup doc said "it doesn't seem to bother her, she's fine". Wasn't convinced so started Alimentum 1 week ago with occasional comfort nursing (maybe 1x every day for a few minutes). Her poops are now brown green but still SO slimy and shiny looking. I'm pumping to keep up my supply, but I'm so emotionally exhausted racking my brain on what to do. I really really want to BF, but feel like I should continue the formula to experiment. Does anyone have experience with dairy intolerance or mucous poops? I wonder at what point I should just stop pumping and accept that she might need formula. Or should I resume BF maybe this week and see if her fussiness and poops change?
    1 replies | 37 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 10:48 AM
    Hi bettyb, many moms who were not able to breastfeed as long as they liked (or at all) with one baby find things go completely ok with the next. So it is possible all will be fine with this baby as far as breastfeeding goes. Since your oldest child was tongue tied, that alone may have accounted for the slow gain. There is evidence that tongue tie can run in families. If you find new baby is not gaining well, do you have a path to have tongue tie diagnosed and treated where you are? When tongue tie is the issue, early treatment makes all the difference. But tongue tie may not have been the issue, or only part of it. If you have any breastfeeding difficulties in the early days, do you know if there is a professional IBCLC you can see? Volunteer LLL Groups or other breastfeeding support near you? My first suggestion is to build your support network NOW rather than scrambling for help in those crazy early days with a newborn. If you find your baby truly needs supplementing, this can be done in a way that is less negatively impactful on breastfeeding. We can provide info here in that event. There are things you can do to get breastfeeding off to a great start. You do not say when baby is due, but if you have time, my best suggestion is the get the book The Womanly Art of Breastfeeding (8th edition) and read the first 6 chapters (they are not long) or read as much as you can. Bring it too the hospital too (assuming this will be a hospital birth.)
    1 replies | 33 view(s)
  • @llli*djs.mom's Avatar
    Today, 08:54 AM
    4days is really early to give up. It sounds like your milk just came in right now. And they aren't supposed to gauge the weight until you are a lot farther in then 4days. They dont' expect the baby to be back up to birth weight until the week point? Maybe the 2 week point? And a newborn can live just fine on Colostrom alone for days. My milk didn't come in for 5 days. I nursed on demand and he was fine. Although that 1st 5 days he didn't gain anyweight. My nurses werent' alarmed so neither was I. They said as long as he had wet diapers we were fine. He did. I didn't trip. Cluster feeding isn't every 2hours. That's NORMAL day to day breastfeeding. Cluster feeding is the baby wanting to feed non-stop for hours. Like every time you try to take the baby off the breast, the look like this :eek::eek: Wide eyes wide mouth. It happens in the very beginning when they are working to get your milk to come in and every time they have a growth spurt and they are working to get your supply to increase due to their growth. Don't confuse the way formula works for satisfaction on the part of your baby. Formula is not as easily or as completely absorbed as breastmilk. It is harder for babies to digest, it takes longer and creates more waste. So, the baby DOES go longer between feeds but those are the reasons. Nipple confusion is real. And it sounds like your baby might have it. But at 4 days old you can totally get your baby back on track. Have a nurse in. Stay skin to skin with the baby...
    3 replies | 117 view(s)
  • @llli*bettyb's Avatar
    Today, 08:07 AM
    Hi all. I am wondering if any of you have been in a similar situation as myself. I am expecting our second baby and hoping to breastfeed. I tried so hard to breastfeed our first and it just did not work out as I hoped. He was very slow to put on weight (took to week 4 before he was back to birth weight), he had a tongue tie, he had severe silent reflux and at the time it just felt we were fighting a losing battle. At 2 weeks we supplemented with formula which looking back now was the beginning of the end. We did not have the knowledge to come back from this at the time. In hindsight supplementing with formula didn't even help with his weight because it took another 2 weeks for him to get back to birth weight so then it was assumed he was a baby who was naturally slow to put on weight. Followed by a trip to A&E and overnight stay in the hospital because he was vomiting blood and they couldn't say for sure if it was from my nipple (no obvious cuts) or from his oesophagus from the reflux. At 6 weeks our breastfeeding journey ended and it was one of the saddest times for me. I'm sure that sounds crazy to some people but it really was like I was grieving. To this day I still feel guilty thinking what if or if only I had know. What helps is we have the happiest and thank God healthiest little baby now so at least there is that and although much shorter than I had hope I do think him having had breast milk even for that short time has really helped So I am due my...
    1 replies | 33 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:16 PM
    Oh for the severe engorgement you might try cold (or very cool) compresses directly on the breasts, and heat only on your back and shoulders if you are finding heat helpful. If you had IV fluids that can cause edema and that can make the breasts even harder and more swollen. As I am sure you know edema like this will pass in a few days. Here is more info on hand expression: http://www.llli.org/docs/0000000000000001WAB/WAB_Tear_sheet_Toolkit/06_hand_expression.pdf and video http://med.stanford.edu/newborns/professional-education/breastfeeding/hand-expressing-milk.html Engorgement: http://kellymom.com/bf/concerns/mother/engorgement/ If baby cannot latch well or at all due to the engorgement, a nipple shield may help as a temporary measure. More: http://kellymom.com/ages/newborn/nb-challenges/wean-shield/
    3 replies | 117 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:06 PM
    Hi jollycat. In that case, you are probably pumping the perfect amount. Here is a situation where the problem is the numbers. Every mom is going to have different numbers. And they are probably going to be at least a little different each time for each mom as well.So, rather than thinking about pumping for X amount of time or until you get Z amount of milk, it is better to think about how your breast feels. After all the reason you are pumping at all is because you are uncomfortable. Right? So pump until you feel more comfortable- not until you are "empty," and not all the time. Only when baby is not nursing enough to get you to where you feel ok. You are not creating a situation where you will always have to pump by only pumping a little when you feel you really need to in order to be comfortable. Many moms make more than enough at this stage of the game. It might help to encourage baby to nurse more often, this is the best course as there are no potential drawbacks- but it does not always do the trick. So when it does not, some moms hand express as needed, some pump as needed, and some just allow the breast to feel full for a while, or some combination of these. All of these are entirely fine, it is all a matter of degree. Over the next couple weeks, your baby may want more at a time and will probably be taking more overall, although that will only be up until about 5 or 6 weeks. At that point, babies do not need more each day, (a one month old and a 6...
    2 replies | 59 view(s)
  • @llli*jollycat's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:29 PM
    Hi, I have an 9 day old who is nursing very well. 8 or more poopy diapers per day and he was back at birth weight at day 7. I saw an IBCLC on day 7 because of engorgement even though he nurses all the time. She suggested I pump 5 minutes when feeling very engorged, with a manual pump, just to relieve discomfort. I've actually only been pumping for 3 minutes, twice per day at the times I feel uncomfortable. I've been getting over 2 ounces with 3 mins so I was nervous to do 5 minutes as she suggested. So in other words, I'm pumping about 4 ounces a day above what baby needs. Is this too much? Will his appetite eventually increase so he wants these four ounces, or am I just creating a situation where I'll always have to pump? I'm not trying to create an oversupply. I will be returning to work in an office one day per week but I'll be pumping there, so I'm not trying to stockpile a freezer stash. I would say it takes me about that much to feel comfortable but maybe it's because he's so young. What do you think? Thank you!
    2 replies | 59 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:37 PM
    Hi mindylane, I am sorry you have been having a difficult time. So, of course breastfeeding is still possible! Oh my gosh, baby is only 4 days? Many newborns who do not nurse at this point nurse fine later. Some babies take many weeks before they are able to latch and nurse. However there is no reason to think that will be the case here. I think you are set to get baby nursing just fine in the next few days because baby has shown they can latch and nurse and you are making milk. First I would suggest see the appropriate professional for the issue you are having. Your baby is refusing to nurse, or for some reason cannot nurse effectively. The professional trained to help in that circumstance is not a doctor but a board certified lactation consultant (IBCLC.) Here is an article about what to expect at an appointment with an IBCLC: http://www.cwgenna.com/lconsult.html As long as baby is not nursing, it is imperative that you pump at least 8 times in 24 hours. Some moms find hand expression works better, or you can alternate. It does not matter as long as the milk is being removed effectively and frequently somehow. Please, I beg you, try not to worry about how much you get out when you pump. It is never much at this age, it is not supposed to be! Also pumps are not babies, they are a substitute and even the best ones may not do what a baby can. And what a baby takes in a bottle is totally irrelevant. OK, let's talk about weight gain. Typical weight loss shortly...
    3 replies | 117 view(s)
  • @llli*mindylane's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:46 AM
    Hi. I just had my baby 4 days ago on the 19th. I really wanted to exclusively breastfeed and as a NICU nurse, I felt pretty confident that I'd be able to. However, it has been nothing but frustration. I thought he started out ok; he'd latch and suck but would get frustrated. I saw lactation at the hospital and she made some suggestions so I thought we'd be good. He ended up losing 8% of his weight by day 2, but they were fine with that. He started getting more and more frustrated with every feed, even though I was feeding him pretty much on demand... usually every 2 hours. We assumed he was cluster feeding. By the time he saw the pediatrician, he had lost 13% of his weight and it turns out I was just literally starving him. The pediatrician suggested supplementing with formula until my milk came in. I was really against it but also didn't want him to lose more weight. My husband fed him maybe 3 bottles over the course of 24 hours and I started pumping. I first pumped .7mL, then 4, then 12. But he would still take 35-60mL from the formula each time. I woke up this morning and my breasts are wildly engorged. They are so incredibly painful and I guess that's why he was getting so frustrated. The milk is there but it isn't making its way out. I'm trying hot compresses, massage, pumping every 2 hours... I'm barely getting anything out and they're rock hard and painful. We saw the pediatrician again this morning. Of course he gained a ton of weight. Thanks to...
    3 replies | 117 view(s)
  • @llli*teach48's Avatar
    July 22nd, 2017, 04:24 PM
    Thank you so much! I appreciate the resources you included and in the depth information you provided! Makes me feel a little better about it all! :)
    2 replies | 116 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    July 22nd, 2017, 11:39 AM
    Hi teach48! So there are many things to consider when a mom is pumping part of the day and baby is getting bottles at that time due to separations. Having a good understanding of how milk production works and how bottle feeding can be done to minimize overfeeding will help you meet your goals of providing your milk for your child and protecting your milk production after you return to work. The lactating breasts are making milk all the time, 24 hours a day. Longer periods of 5-6 hours of no milk removal tend to happen around this age, in particular overnight, without it being any problem for milk production, as long as milk removal is still happening frequently and effectively enough overall. And milk can be removed from the breasts at any time. So there is really no such thing as a "missed" pumping session. If pumping break time at work is not optimal, if needed and if you choose, you could pump when you are home, or encourage your baby to nurse more often overnight/weekends in order to protect your milk production, or pump some other time during your work day even if that means two pump sessions are close together, or some combination of these. (If you are uncomfortable going that long without pumping, you may need to find a way to at least quickly hand express to relieve pressure, which will protect your health and your milk production, even if you are not able to save that milk.) My first suggestion is to make sure breastfeeding is going very well before...
    2 replies | 116 view(s)
  • @llli*teach48's Avatar
    July 22nd, 2017, 10:39 AM
    I will be going back to work in the next few weeks. As a teacher, I won't be able to pump as often as my 5 (then 6 month) daughter nurses. It looks like I will be skipping one feeding session, going about 5 hours. If I skip a pumping session, supplementing with frozen breastmilk, and then formula, as needed, will my supply hold when I pump or breastfeed other times of the day? I know it's not ideal, but I think it's what I have to work with. Will I be able to nurse on the weekends still? I am also concerned because when I pump I don't generally produce as much as she eats, so I am concerned in general about pumping. I have been pumping at night to build up a stash, but a few ounces a day will go quickly. What's been your experience? I am trying not to freak out about it all.
    2 replies | 116 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    July 21st, 2017, 05:04 PM
    Reflux: Our experience with reflux is that my son had frequent and large spitups, painful "burps" and also that he hated being laid on his back and was generally quite fussy lots of the time. We tried reclining where he slept too- we had a "wedge" under him when he slept in our bed, put books under one side of the legs of his crib and basinet- none of that did much. He just slid down! By far what helped the most was holding him pretty much upright most of the time, in particular for a while after nursing, but really as much as possible. When he was about 3 or 4 months I finally got a sling and that helped tremendously, both husband and I "wore" him most of the time. The spitting up etc. etc. was going on for a long time before doctor said it was reflux and we should try meds. That was when he was about 4 months old. We discontinued the meds after about 2 months, so he was then about 6 months. Somewhere around when he could start to stay sitting up on his own and crawl the symptoms began to alleviate, which makes sense if you think about it. So, maybe 8 months or so? The issues tapered off slowly, so it is hard to remember exactly, but it was certainly well before he was a year old. He still spit up at times and had some occasional painful burps, but it was much less. Also he was a "short" sleeper (nursed lots overnight) until well after his second birthday. But that is just the way some babies are and does not mean baby has reflux or anything else wrong. One...
    6 replies | 543 view(s)
  • @llli*mandra's Avatar
    July 21st, 2017, 03:12 PM
    Thank you for your prompt response! No, I don't understand the "value" of thickeners. The only reason I said I was willing to try it was because the GI told us it will help with the chocking. That's the scariest thing about my baby's reflux. Today we were driving and I had to pull over because she was choking so bad, out of nowhere. That happens at night too, and I am so worried that I don't get much sleep, for fear she will choke. She sleeps in a co-sleeper in our bed, in between our pillows, and we elevated her a little to help with the reflux but she still grunts very often and does't sleep for more than 1.5-2 hours at a time, and the choking is the worst. So when I heard that the thickener would help with that of course I was excited. But the more research I do about it, the more worried I am and will not probably not use it, at least for now. I will try the new medicine, and be dairy and soy free and see if there are any changes. Baby is gaining good and there are no other serious health problems, other than the pain (I can tell she is in a lot of pain sometimes, she is a very happy, chatty baby otherwise), the choking, and the spitting up. When did your little one outgrow his reflux, if you don't mind me asking? The GI told us that it will get worse and she will vomit a lot more, and it won't get better until 12-18 months. I forgot to mention, we also give our baby vitamin D (pediatrician said all breastfed babies should take 1ml/day) and Gerber probiotic drops...
    6 replies | 543 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    July 21st, 2017, 12:58 PM
    Hi, thanks for the update! I am sorry you are having this reflux concern. Maybe you understand the value of thickener but I am not sure I do...is your baby gaining very poorly or for some other reason risking serious health issues due to the reflux, and is there any proof the thickener will help? Also why are so many interventions being given at once? If you are fine to give up dairy and soy, that is one intervention. Meds are another. Shouldn't those be tried (perhaps consecutively) for a while before taking the extreme step of no longer breastfeeding? I would suggest not giving up breastfeeding or even going 50/50. There are so many drawbacks to pumping/bottles even 50% of the time as far as longevity of breastfeeding and milk production that it should only be done when there are no other options. How much have you researched this on your own? This seems like a very extreme intervention to me for reflux. My oldest was also diagnosed with reflux, meds did not really help (we tried zantac, then prevacid) The upshot is we kept exclusively breastfeeding on cue and he simply outgrew the reflux. In the meantime we held him upright as much as possible, and he nursed very frequently. Frequent meals helped a great deal. Also he usually nursed one side at a time. What happens if you just let baby nurse one side at a time?
    6 replies | 543 view(s)
  • @llli*mandra's Avatar
    July 21st, 2017, 09:22 AM
    Thank you both for your feedback, it has helped A LOT!!! We made it to 2 months! :) My baby will be 2 months tomorrow, but it turns out she does have reflux. After not getting any real answers or help from our pediatrician (other than suggesting to give formula - not sure why so many doctors do that), we decided to go see a pediatric GI. We just came back from seeing her. I like how she explained everything to us, but I still have concerns. Baby will be put on a different medicine (the one the pediatrician gave us didn't help at all), and although I am not very happy about giving her any medication at this age, I can't see her in pain anymore so I am willing to try it. GI also told me to stop eating dairy and soy, not a problem, I will do it. My big concern is that she wanted me to pump 100% so I can add a thickener to the milk. This I kind of have a problem with because my baby and I both enjoy the time we have together, breastfeeding, and I don't want to give that up. It's good for both of us, and it's not just the milk, it's everything else, the cuddling, the comfort, the looking into each other's eyes etc. I understand why the GI wants me to do it. Baby has been nursing fine, but recently I can see she is in pain, especially after she eats on one breast and I move her to the second one, she sometimes pulls away and cries. I have tried different nursing positions but when she's in pain, none of them work. Any suggestions here? I told the GI I will not stop breastfeeding...
    6 replies | 543 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    July 21st, 2017, 08:58 AM
    There are many reasons why expressing milk while away from baby might become harder as baby gets older. In other words it might be related to the plug or it might not. First it would help to know how much you were typically able to express before, and what you are expressing now, and how that differs from the other breast? By this age many moms see a natural reduction in the amount they can express at once. Are you seeing no change at all in your ability to express milk in the other breast? Do you feel as though there is milk, but you are just not able to get it out when expressing? Did you try pumping as well? A few ideas that may have caused this- The plug led to overfullness and your body got the message to reduce production in that breast. In that case, your child nursing lots should increase production and help the issue. There are still plugs or inflammation (swelling) in the breast causing poor milk removal. That side has for a while not been 'stimulated" enough with frequent/effective enough milk removal, which would lead to both the plug AND a reduction in production. Your milk production is reducing a bit naturally (perhaps you had more than enough before) and where that is obvious is in the amount you are able to express. Since babies are better at milk removal than anything else, some mom find they need to actually be making more than enough milk to express much milk.
    1 replies | 242 view(s)
  • @llli*gilismom's Avatar
    July 20th, 2017, 11:11 PM
    Hi KNowledgeable Mamas! I have a five month old (my 4th child), EBF. I had a plugged duct for five or six days this week and got rid of it with lots of breastfeeding. I tried to go back to work yesterday and hand express there - which usually goes very well for me - and from that side, nearly nothing came out. I had to run home to BF her! Is this a result of the plugged duct? Will this resolve after a few more days of BF'ing my daughter? I need to be able to go back to work and pump/hand express and in gen'l be able to be away from my baby for a few hours..... Thanks so much!
    1 replies | 242 view(s)
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