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  • @llli*teach48's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:24 PM
    Thank you so much! I appreciate the resources you included and in the depth information you provided! Makes me feel a little better about it all! :)
    2 replies | 60 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:39 AM
    Hi teach48! So there are many things to consider when a mom is pumping part of the day and baby is getting bottles at that time due to separations. Having a good understanding of how milk production works and how bottle feeding can be done to minimize overfeeding will help you meet your goals of providing your milk for your child and protecting your milk production after you return to work. The lactating breasts are making milk all the time, 24 hours a day. Longer periods of 5-6 hours of no milk removal tend to happen around this age, in particular overnight, without it being any problem for milk production, as long as milk removal is still happening frequently and effectively enough overall. And milk can be removed from the breasts at any time. So there is really no such thing as a "missed" pumping session. If pumping break time at work is not optimal, if needed and if you choose, you could pump when you are home, or encourage your baby to nurse more often overnight/weekends in order to protect your milk production, or pump some other time during your work day even if that means two pump sessions are close together, or some combination of these. (If you are uncomfortable going that long without pumping, you may need to find a way to at least quickly hand express to relieve pressure, which will protect your health and your milk production, even if you are not able to save that milk.) My first suggestion is to make sure breastfeeding is going very well before...
    2 replies | 60 view(s)
  • @llli*teach48's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:39 AM
    I will be going back to work in the next few weeks. As a teacher, I won't be able to pump as often as my 5 (then 6 month) daughter nurses. It looks like I will be skipping one feeding session, going about 5 hours. If I skip a pumping session, supplementing with frozen breastmilk, and then formula, as needed, will my supply hold when I pump or breastfeed other times of the day? I know it's not ideal, but I think it's what I have to work with. Will I be able to nurse on the weekends still? I am also concerned because when I pump I don't generally produce as much as she eats, so I am concerned in general about pumping. I have been pumping at night to build up a stash, but a few ounces a day will go quickly. What's been your experience? I am trying not to freak out about it all.
    2 replies | 60 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    July 21st, 2017, 05:04 PM
    Reflux: Our experience with reflux is that my son had frequent and large spitups, painful "burps" and also that he hated being laid on his back and was generally quite fussy lots of the time. We tried reclining where he slept too- we had a "wedge" under him when he slept in our bed, put books under one side of the legs of his crib and basinet- none of that did much. He just slid down! By far what helped the most was holding him pretty much upright most of the time, in particular for a while after nursing, but really as much as possible. When he was about 3 or 4 months I finally got a sling and that helped tremendously, both husband and I "wore" him most of the time. The spitting up etc. etc. was going on for a long time before doctor said it was reflux and we should try meds. That was when he was about 4 months old. We discontinued the meds after about 2 months, so he was then about 6 months. Somewhere around when he could start to stay sitting up on his own and crawl the symptoms began to alleviate, which makes sense if you think about it. So, maybe 8 months or so? The issues tapered off slowly, so it is hard to remember exactly, but it was certainly well before he was a year old. He still spit up at times and had some occasional painful burps, but it was much less. Also he was a "short" sleeper (nursed lots overnight) until well after his second birthday. But that is just the way some babies are and does not mean baby has reflux or anything else wrong. One...
    6 replies | 490 view(s)
  • @llli*mandra's Avatar
    July 21st, 2017, 03:12 PM
    Thank you for your prompt response! No, I don't understand the "value" of thickeners. The only reason I said I was willing to try it was because the GI told us it will help with the chocking. That's the scariest thing about my baby's reflux. Today we were driving and I had to pull over because she was choking so bad, out of nowhere. That happens at night too, and I am so worried that I don't get much sleep, for fear she will choke. She sleeps in a co-sleeper in our bed, in between our pillows, and we elevated her a little to help with the reflux but she still grunts very often and does't sleep for more than 1.5-2 hours at a time, and the choking is the worst. So when I heard that the thickener would help with that of course I was excited. But the more research I do about it, the more worried I am and will not probably not use it, at least for now. I will try the new medicine, and be dairy and soy free and see if there are any changes. Baby is gaining good and there are no other serious health problems, other than the pain (I can tell she is in a lot of pain sometimes, she is a very happy, chatty baby otherwise), the choking, and the spitting up. When did your little one outgrow his reflux, if you don't mind me asking? The GI told us that it will get worse and she will vomit a lot more, and it won't get better until 12-18 months. I forgot to mention, we also give our baby vitamin D (pediatrician said all breastfed babies should take 1ml/day) and Gerber probiotic drops...
    6 replies | 490 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    July 21st, 2017, 12:58 PM
    Hi, thanks for the update! I am sorry you are having this reflux concern. Maybe you understand the value of thickener but I am not sure I do...is your baby gaining very poorly or for some other reason risking serious health issues due to the reflux, and is there any proof the thickener will help? Also why are so many interventions being given at once? If you are fine to give up dairy and soy, that is one intervention. Meds are another. Shouldn't those be tried (perhaps consecutively) for a while before taking the extreme step of no longer breastfeeding? I would suggest not giving up breastfeeding or even going 50/50. There are so many drawbacks to pumping/bottles even 50% of the time as far as longevity of breastfeeding and milk production that it should only be done when there are no other options. How much have you researched this on your own? This seems like a very extreme intervention to me for reflux. My oldest was also diagnosed with reflux, meds did not really help (we tried zantac, then prevacid) The upshot is we kept exclusively breastfeeding on cue and he simply outgrew the reflux. In the meantime we held him upright as much as possible, and he nursed very frequently. Frequent meals helped a great deal. Also he usually nursed one side at a time. What happens if you just let baby nurse one side at a time?
    6 replies | 490 view(s)
  • @llli*mandra's Avatar
    July 21st, 2017, 09:22 AM
    Thank you both for your feedback, it has helped A LOT!!! We made it to 2 months! :) My baby will be 2 months tomorrow, but it turns out she does have reflux. After not getting any real answers or help from our pediatrician (other than suggesting to give formula - not sure why so many doctors do that), we decided to go see a pediatric GI. We just came back from seeing her. I like how she explained everything to us, but I still have concerns. Baby will be put on a different medicine (the one the pediatrician gave us didn't help at all), and although I am not very happy about giving her any medication at this age, I can't see her in pain anymore so I am willing to try it. GI also told me to stop eating dairy and soy, not a problem, I will do it. My big concern is that she wanted me to pump 100% so I can add a thickener to the milk. This I kind of have a problem with because my baby and I both enjoy the time we have together, breastfeeding, and I don't want to give that up. It's good for both of us, and it's not just the milk, it's everything else, the cuddling, the comfort, the looking into each other's eyes etc. I understand why the GI wants me to do it. Baby has been nursing fine, but recently I can see she is in pain, especially after she eats on one breast and I move her to the second one, she sometimes pulls away and cries. I have tried different nursing positions but when she's in pain, none of them work. Any suggestions here? I told the GI I will not stop breastfeeding...
    6 replies | 490 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    July 21st, 2017, 08:58 AM
    There are many reasons why expressing milk while away from baby might become harder as baby gets older. In other words it might be related to the plug or it might not. First it would help to know how much you were typically able to express before, and what you are expressing now, and how that differs from the other breast? By this age many moms see a natural reduction in the amount they can express at once. Are you seeing no change at all in your ability to express milk in the other breast? Do you feel as though there is milk, but you are just not able to get it out when expressing? Did you try pumping as well? A few ideas that may have caused this- The plug led to overfullness and your body got the message to reduce production in that breast. In that case, your child nursing lots should increase production and help the issue. There are still plugs or inflammation (swelling) in the breast causing poor milk removal. That side has for a while not been 'stimulated" enough with frequent/effective enough milk removal, which would lead to both the plug AND a reduction in production. Your milk production is reducing a bit naturally (perhaps you had more than enough before) and where that is obvious is in the amount you are able to express. Since babies are better at milk removal than anything else, some mom find they need to actually be making more than enough milk to express much milk.
    1 replies | 208 view(s)
  • @llli*gilismom's Avatar
    July 20th, 2017, 11:11 PM
    Hi KNowledgeable Mamas! I have a five month old (my 4th child), EBF. I had a plugged duct for five or six days this week and got rid of it with lots of breastfeeding. I tried to go back to work yesterday and hand express there - which usually goes very well for me - and from that side, nearly nothing came out. I had to run home to BF her! Is this a result of the plugged duct? Will this resolve after a few more days of BF'ing my daughter? I need to be able to go back to work and pump/hand express and in gen'l be able to be away from my baby for a few hours..... Thanks so much!
    1 replies | 208 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    July 20th, 2017, 12:34 AM
    :ita of course! I hate that they put a number on nursing sessions, as it so often leads to moms worrying when baby wants to nurse more and clearly confuses health care providers who do not understand that the often stated number (10-12) or time line (every 2 to 3 hours) are MINIMUMS and that most babies nurse more often and in cluster patterns and in many cases much more often! Enjoy your dear new baby and how much easier it will be this time around. Sounds like you are both doing great.
    4 replies | 236 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    July 20th, 2017, 12:24 AM
    Hi dcs123. I would suggest figure out about how much you will need to leave and then work backwards from there. For example. The average daily intake for a breastfed baby of 1 month or older is 25-35 ounces per 24 hour day. So if the separation is for 3 entire days - 72 hours, baby can be presumed to need between about 70 and 100 ounces total. So, in that case, say you have 2 months (60 days) to pump the 100 ounces. If you have op, then when you pump you probably get at least 2-3 ounces, right? In that case, you could plan to pump once a day and have enough in 35-50 days. But it is also possible that pump output will decrease as your milk production reduces to more accurately meet your baby's need. So I think pumping once a day about 2-3 ounces each day would make sense for those numbers and increase if necessary. You want to avoid pumping too much to avoid making your overproduction problematic. This way you are leaving some cushion in time so that when there are days you cannot pump etc. there will still be enough milk for you to go on your trip. Even if you did not have quite 100 ounces it would probably be fine- remember that would represent the max baby might need.
    1 replies | 125 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    July 19th, 2017, 08:48 PM
    So baby has never wanted to nurse more often than every 3-4 hours, even when offered? Has weight gain been normal? As a baby gets better at transferring milk and moms milk production increases over the first several weeks, babies do tend to nurse shorter periods, and even 8-10 minutes for a whole nursing session could be entirely normal. But I agree that nursing every 6 hours is much too little for a 6 week old baby. More common at this age is more like 10 times in 24 hours or more. I would suggest do not worry at all about fat content or anything else about the 'quality' of your milk, and I know of no reason to be worried about 'foamy' poop that other wise looks entirely normal. There is a wide range of normal look for infant poop, if a poop is truly problematic, it is very obvious. Also fussiness at the breast is rarely anything to worry about. The only thing you report that sounds unusual to me is the low nursing frequency. But that could be normal too (as long as baby nurses at least 6-8 times in 24 hours.) If your baby is gaining well, probably no worries. But often a baby will nurse more often overall if they are offered. No need to wait for cues. Also it does not have to be every such and such hours but rather when you feel like it, with baby nursing more often some parts of the day. Encouraging baby to nurse overall more often certainly cannot hurt.
    1 replies | 133 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    July 19th, 2017, 08:37 PM
    Block feeding reduces milk production- but while it is being done it may worsen the issue of fast letdown, at least at first. This is because fast letdown increases the longer milk sits in the breast and you have to let milk sit in the breasts for longer in order to "block" a breast. So if for example baby is nursing every 2 hours, and you are blocking each breast for 4 hours, every time you switch, baby may be getting the same or even more flow than they did before- even if your milk production is beginning to reduce. About 6 weeks is the typical peak of milk production and after that, assuming mom makes more than enough, her production will begin to reduce on its own. So one strategy would be the forget block nursing, nurse more frequently or as frequently as baby will but maybe one side at a time, and see if that helps with the flow while your milk production naturally reduces over time. If you want to keep block nursing, you can still encourage baby to nurse frequently, so that only when baby switches to the "blocked" side will the flow be fast. The issues you are seeing are temporary and not hurting your baby. It is normal for babies to spit up and some spit up a great deal. it is very normal for newborn babies to have lots of gas, even some painful gas, explosive poop- none of this is unusual for this age and it will reduce overtime even if you do nothing. It is important to understand that there are cautions one should take when block nursing. Here is a...
    1 replies | 135 view(s)
  • @llli*dcs123's Avatar
    July 19th, 2017, 05:42 PM
    Hello! I'm EBF my 7 week old. I have an oversupply, so I only pump when the baby gets a bottle (so she can get used to it). I am going on a trip in a couple months over a long weekend. When/how much should I pump so that the baby has enough to eat during my time away from her? TIA!
    1 replies | 125 view(s)
  • @llli*megkl15's Avatar
    July 19th, 2017, 05:32 PM
    I talked to a lactation specialist that told me to block feed (my baby eats every 2 hrs) to help with my oversupply and forceful letdown. My baby is almost 7 weeks and has gained almost 1lb per week, recently he's been spitting up a lot when he feeds, just opens his mouth and milk pours out. He seems fussier than usual and I have been giving him gas relief. His bms are very explosive, runny and yellow. I'm just wondering if block feeding will help my issues, so far it's been 4 days and I have seen a little improvement but not too much
    1 replies | 135 view(s)
  • @llli*jollycat's Avatar
    July 19th, 2017, 12:42 PM
    Thank you for your reply, and that all makes a lot of sense. I switched back to the pampers with blue strip they gave me at the hospital and now I see he's peeing a lot so I wonder if I was missing the pee due to the poops like you said. Yes, I had to do all that weighing, waking, etc. with my twins. Plus pumping after every feeding etc. It was so much work and while it was worth it, I'm so glad not to have to do that this time. This time, the hospital staff seemed to think it strange that I wasn't going by "feed him every three hours" or whatever but this baby was cuing to eat a lot more than that--more than the "12 times per day" rule even. So they thought I was feeding him a lot but were also happy with his output. Of course the two go hand in hand! I just want to establish a good milk supply so I'm not worried about him eating so frequently right now. Still way easier than what took place with the twins! :)
    4 replies | 236 view(s)
  • @llli*amelia428's Avatar
    July 19th, 2017, 11:00 AM
    Thanks. Yeah I definitely don't want to go under. But apparently draining it can just lead it to fill up and again and again. I hope I can just leave it as is and deal without it getting bigger :/
    2 replies | 164 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    July 19th, 2017, 09:30 AM
    Oh help me. Why did the doctor tell you to do the extremely serious intervention of no longer nursing your child if (as is correct) the mucous is nothing to worry about? What is wrong with these doctors???? Ok, first to clarify- yellow is the color of most baby poop and all poop has mucous in it and is "runny." But I guess you are seeing something outside the norm for your baby? Mucous occurs naturally in the body and is required for the digestive system to work. When you or anyone one else poops, there is some mucous. You just do not usually see it. An infant who is pooping frequently and the poop is going into a diaper may have more visible mucous just because the poop is so much more visible in that circumstance. Has there been any other changes in the poop- how often, how much, consistency? A child who has more mucous than normal may have some kind of inflammation going on, a cold, tummy virus...many possibilities. Another cause in breastfed babies is if mom has overproduction and/or baby is not nursing with normal (high) frequency. Please note even if this is the reason, it is not a reason to stop nursing! Or it could just be a temporary entirely normal thing that goes away as mysteriously as it came. Extra mucous is formed to protect the child's system from whatever might be trying to invade the system or causing inflammation. In other words, the mucous itself is usually all the "treatment" your baby needs. It is not harming baby, and if otherwise baby...
    1 replies | 125 view(s)
  • @llli*sophiewalter's Avatar
    July 19th, 2017, 09:03 AM
    Hello to all moms over here, I have questions for you. I have been breastfeeding my daughter for 2 months now and few days ago I noticed that her poop was not like before, it was yellowish. We went straight to doctor and she said it's mucus and that we should not be worried about it, but to stop breastfeeding her just in case. We are going again in few days to see how it's going but she is still pooping something yellowish and it's runny. Did anybody experienced the same mucus in stool problem with their babies?
    1 replies | 125 view(s)
  • @llli*eviesmom67's Avatar
    July 19th, 2017, 08:51 AM
    Hi, all! I'm so confused with what my daughter has been doing lately. A few days ago, she had a day where she would feed every 6 hours instead of her normal 3-4. After that day she went back to feeding every 4 hours or so, but with less hunger cues. She went from feeding 40-45 minutes to 15-20 minutes and also went from feeding on one side until I switched her to refusing to nurse on one side after 8-10 minutes. She will spit out the nipple, cry and pull away if I try to get her to latch back on to that side and isn't satisfied until I put her on the other side. Also noticing nighttime is the worst with fussiness at the breast! I don't believe I'm overproducing since I see no signs of that and I consistently get the same amount when pumping at the same time each day. Expressed milk looks the same as far as fat content too. I've also noticed since she's started this new feeding ritual, she's been more fussy and has had foamy, yellow poo. It's the same color as always, is seedy and looks the same in her diapers. I only noticed it was foamy since she pooed while she was naked before a bath. I read that this could be a foremilk/hindmilk imbalance, but I've also read in some places that it would be green as well. Anyone have any insight or tips? I know that both she and my body will become more efficient in feeding and the time at the breast will shorten, but does this happen so suddenly? I've been so confident in breastfeeding until now and I'm getting worried. HELP!
    1 replies | 133 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    July 18th, 2017, 11:21 PM
    Yes this falls under the normal column. Also very normal. Have you considered if bedsharing might work for you? If not, or if you are and baby is still so wakeful, I suggest tag team these long midnight hours and take naps as you can during the day so you both get enough rest to function. This won't be forever but this overnight marathon is par for the course in these early weeks. If you want more info on bedsharing let me know. Other suggestions: If baby has nursed to sleep, I would suggest let baby sleep and don't try to burp baby. Go ahead and hold baby sleeping baby upright for a while before putting down but let baby sleep. A baby who is taking that long to burp probably does not really need to burp. A baby who needs to be burped and has a pain due to trapped air is going to let you know they need help and burp quickly when they get it. This can happen at any time, not just right after baby nurses. Newborn babies spit up whether they are burped or not. It is normal. Changing a baby is used as a technique to wake and stimulate babies who are not nursing often enough for a good reason- it can be very stimulating to a baby to have their diaper changed. So if you are trying to NOT stimulate but rather, settle baby, try avoiding changing baby overnight unless it is REALLY needed- if baby has had a blow out or is clearly leaking. Instead if baby stirs just immediately nurse baby back to sleep again and you may find baby will go more quickly into a deeper, slightly...
    1 replies | 172 view(s)
  • @llli*djs.mom's Avatar
    July 18th, 2017, 10:21 PM
    I think draining it is different than what a surgeon will do. If you go under the knife I believe they will remove the tissue that would re-fill if you just drained it. And it may be less common because of the cost and also...you may have to go under to get that done and there is always a risk with that and a lot of people prefer not to do that if they don't have to. I think the ultrasound is a good idea as is the lecithin.
    2 replies | 164 view(s)
  • @llli*lpetix's Avatar
    July 18th, 2017, 09:12 PM
    Please tell me if this is part of "normal newborn behavior". Every night starting around her midnight nursing session, she begins this cycle of frequent feeds, spit up/burping/ diaper changes. What i mean is, she nurses about 15-20 minutes, then takes about 15 minutes to get her to burp (sometimes she spits up if we put her down before keeping her upright for a while), then we try rocking her to sleep after swaddling and rocking, which works after 20 minutes, but then she wakes up as soon as we lay her down in her bassinet-- then we try changing her, then rocking her again, but still won't let us put her down-- at which point it's been an hour and then I try nursing and sure enough, she takes the breast and is hungry again and the cycle repeats, never falling asleep unless she's in our arms. This continues usually through 2 or 3 feeding cycles. One other side note that makes this process difficult is she seems to really dislike being swaddled- we use the swaddleme velcro swaddle blankets and as soon as she's in it she makes these grunting/straining noises trying to wriggle out and makes herself more upset sometimes. She does better in the muslin swaddles, but those don't last longer than 10 minutes and I don't feel comfortable leaving her in that over night as I'm scared of it unwraveling and suffocating her. - she is 16 days old - already past her birth weight and continuing to gain appropriately - during the day she generally falls asleep much easier and is more...
    1 replies | 172 view(s)
  • @llli*amelia428's Avatar
    July 18th, 2017, 06:49 PM
    Apologies if this isn't in the right place! I saw my OB today for a large breast lump that used to be a clogged duct but has not gone away and grown in size. She didn't know much but thinks it's a galactocele and referred me for an ultrasound and consult with the breast surgeon. Of course they can't see me until next week. From reading online this seems fairly uncommon. People can leave it as is or get it drained - but draining seems to risk it filling again and/or infection. Does anyone know anything about what I can do to treat this other than draining it? Are there any home remedies? I'm managing the pain from the weight of the cyst with Advil. I'm also heating, massaging, taking lecithin, and a million other things. I'm hoping someone will miraculously have a cure - or at the very least have had this and can tell me what route they took. Thanks!!
    2 replies | 164 view(s)
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