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  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 01:24 AM
    Hi. Usually small amounts of blood is simply a passing phase and not a health concern. I do not have personal experience but mommal does...unfortunately she has not been able to post in a while but maybe you can find her comments on this in another thread. Bottom line if your baby is growing normal and otherwise healthy, most likely the blood is not an issue that requires any intervention...and certainly not an intervention as drastic as taking away breastfeeding when there are many proven health related drawbacks to eliminating either breastmilk or breastfeeding! Plus the fact your pediatrician must not be all that concerned if they were fine to wait a month to see baby again. Also if the dairy and soy elimination did not make a difference then that is not the problem and you can eat those again if you want. You can try eliminating other things, but that may not even be necessary. Do you mean over supply? Sometimes blood in the stool indicates mom is overproducing a bit. There is not much you can do in that case aside wait and not do anything to increase production more (like unnecessary pumping.) Undersupply is not a cause of blood in stool that I know of, also, it would not be indicated in a case of a baby who is gaining perfectly normally, as your baby is. However gain is also not so rapid it indicates much overproduction either. Do you see any other indications of OP (do you feel full between nursing sessions, does baby ever cough or gag or choke when...
    1 replies | 36 view(s)
  • @llli*seranada's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:55 PM
    Hello, this is my first post here. My baby is 9 days old, I've been pumping and getting small amounts of colostrum, but no milk. Is there a point where I should just give up? It's really starting to feel hopeless.
    0 replies | 13 view(s)
  • @llli*jhart's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:42 PM
    Actually, we moved two years ago, but I don't have anyone here treating my PCOS. I go to midwives for birth/gyn, and their training is not in PCOS. The IBCLC said Domperidone. I need to get it from Canada. Obviously it's not the first thing they suggest but I've been doing all the usual suggestions. I joined a Facebook group for women with PCOS who have low supply. They are big into Dom. Also ketosis diets seem to be big. Basically, the keto diet addresses the insulin resistance aspects of PCOS. There is some interplay between insulin and prolactin, so if your insulin is misregulated (as is the case with PCOS), your brain does not release enough prolactin in response to the baby's sucking and emptying of the breast. The keto diet down-regulates your insulin so that your brain can properly release prolactin. The Dom promotes prolactin release. Basically, talking to both the LC and the FB group, it sounds like the PCOS is inhibiting the usual feedback loop in which more emptying leads to more production. All this was very interesting to me, and I think I'm going to aim for Dom and the keto diet.
    6 replies | 183 view(s)
  • @llli*sheasmom4's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:55 PM
    My 9 week old EBF girl has had streaks of blood in her poop since about 5 weeks. I have eliminated dairy and soy and it has made minimal difference. She poops about 6-8x per day still, this hasn't decreased since birth. Her pediatrician suggested cutting dairy when she was 5 weeks old and said if it didn't improve in 2 weeks we should put her on special formula. I will be seeing the pediatrician tomorrow and I know she is going to bring up formula again. I was mostly only feeding off one breast but after reading dr jack Newman's advice I am now offering both. This has changed her poops from ranging in green/orange/brown in colour to mostly yellow but there is still blood. I don't think it's an under supply issue. She was 6lbs14oz at birth, 7 lbs 3oz at 2 weeks, 8 lbs 3 oz at 4 weeks and 12 lbs at 2 months. She is very content and sleeps well, does not spit up a ton with the exception of the occasional large puke-like spit up. Has anyone experienced something similar and found a way to control it? Thank you.
    1 replies | 36 view(s)
  • @llli*snackycake's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:16 PM
    Just checking in with an update. I went to see a family physician shortly after moving in the hopes that both the baby and I could be treated at once, but since his medical records haven't arrived yet there was nothing she could do for him. :cry In any event she didn't seem to be particularly knowledgeable about thrush, so she just checked her reference materials and prescribed me more Diflucan and sent me on my way, which I suppose bought me another 14 days of breastfeeding to figure this out (7 left now . . .). I have an appointment with an IBCLC on Friday who works out of a nearby center specializing in women's health. Maybe she can help me sort this out. I'm wondering if what I thought was returning thrush on the baby is actually just milk tongue - it's just toward the back, not on the whole tongue anymore, and it doesn't seem to be responding to Gentian Violet but also doesn't appear to be spreading. Maybe we had thrush before but got rid of it and now I just have some other nipple issue? Who knows? I just want it resolved, I feel like I spend half my time sterilizing things and swabbing my nipples and the baby's mouth and trying to keep our linens from getting purple stains and shopping for probiotics and on and on and on . . . I'm on maternity leave but as I mentioned, I've just moved and have plenty of other things I need to be doing rather than fighting a never-ending (and losing!) battle with yeast. Thank you all for your encouragement, at any rate. Please...
    16 replies | 1161 view(s)
  • @llli*parakeet's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:33 PM
    My son is turning four months this week. For the past week or so he has taken to screaming at the breast. It looks like he simply does not want to nurse. Same with the bottle. Just doesn't want it in his mouth. The only time he will actually eat is when he's sleepy or he is swaddled and there's white noise. Otherwise he just fights and fights feedings. Nursing was never easy with this one. He was born a month early, had jaundice, had a tongue tie, had excessive sleepiness. Just when I thought things are getting better the screaming has started. A typical feed looks like this - offer breast, eats 3-4 minutes, starts screaming. Let him play, then offer breast again and more screaming. Then swaddle, and put white noise, eats for 5 minutes. Then unswaddle and play more. Then feed more as he gets close to his nap time. Another 5 minutes of food. An IBCLC did a home visit yesterday and he took 2.2 ounces over the course of one feed. He gets one bottle of expressed milk a day while I sleep and that too he drinks 2-2.5 oz. He eats 7-8x a day. His weight gain has always been minimal. First three months he was averaging 5oz/ week and during this fourth month he has gained 12oz. From what I understand this is the lowest range of acceptable. The LC mentioned something about oral aversion and was going to get back to me with occupational therapist names.
    0 replies | 33 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    June 26th, 2017, 06:33 PM
    Hi kellena, I agree with carm3, you would have to up your milk production by, first and foremost, increasing how often you pump - possibly by quite a lot. And that would probably mean pumping more often at work unless you work part time. Of course you want to help this mom, but at this point, assuming you even can, do you want to increase your milk production to the extent needed? You might want to think about how this would impact you- your work, your time, your fertility etc. I also wonder why the mom needs donor milk and how much she needs. If is a lot, she may want to line up several donors.
    2 replies | 62 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    June 26th, 2017, 06:13 PM
    Well the good news is that if your baby is already not nursing much overnight, that will help, as the typical gentle weaning tips are much easier to implement when you are awake. Also your child is nursing with a fairly low frequency already- meaning, the weaning process that began when baby started eating solids is already well on its way. So maybe it will help you to think of this as not making your child wean but rather, as speeding up the process that is already happening. LLL has long suggested that, when possible, weaning goes best when it is allowed to occur gradually. This is deliberately vague, because how gradual is gradual? It depends on the situation. It sounds like you would like the weaning process to be over fairly soon, but you are also not contemplating needing to abruptly wean in just a few days...do I have that right? Anyway, there are two excellent books on weaning I would recommend. The Nursing Mother's Guide to Weaning and How Weaning Happens. They will be able to give you may ideas and also specific information about what is happening both for mom and child during the weaning process. You do not need both, one is fine. If you just want some quick suggestions, the typical and most recommended weaning strategies can be summed up like this: Don't offer, don't refuse. Avoid: (situations or position that cause child to want to nurse or expect to nurse.) Distract: say "Let's do..." (anything aside nursing your child might want to do or...
    1 replies | 54 view(s)
  • @llli*mamer3's Avatar
    June 26th, 2017, 03:33 PM
    Just wanted to update and fill you in maddieb after all your help. So 2 days after my last post, DD got a simple cold but it meant she went off her solids and so the doctor decided it was time to go to the children's hospital. His referral letter stated that she was severe failure to thrive with fine and gross motor delay :( She was admitted and we stayed there for 5 nights. She had chest xray, bloods, pre and post feeding weight check (she went up 6oz's) and lots of assessment and discussion with a paediatrician and dietitian. In the end nothing was found! Which was great but still quite confusing how she ended up so small. The dietitian was very pro breastfeeding and very supportive, the paediatrician less so and appeared to be frustrated with not being able to tell what her intake was and had been, but overall there was good support. The paed at one point mentioned giving formula but was leaving that to the dietitian to decide and thankfully she was having none of it. Whilst in there her weight went from 5.38kg (she'd lost weight in the few days before being admitted and a different scales too I suppose) to 5.77kg :) So the paed said we needed to see now if that continues and if not further tests on her kidneys etc will be done. So we were sent home to have weekly weights and follow up appointments. The dietitian wants a 4oz weight gain a week. And gave lots of info on high calorie foods etc plus minimum of 6 feeds/day and not to let her go more than 6 hours...
    8 replies | 679 view(s)
  • @llli*iveehill's Avatar
    June 26th, 2017, 02:52 PM
    I am having some health issues that may require me to start the weaning process. :cry I have systemic candida and heavy metal toxicity, which has resulted in severe thyroid issues and other symptoms. It might not sound bad, but the symptoms are debilitating. My daughter is 17 months old. I cannot treat these issues as long as she is breastfeeding, and I have put off the treatment now for about 10 months. I'm afraid that my health is going to suffer permanently if I put off treatment much longer. I always told myself that I would breastfeed until my daughter self-weaned, but now that does not seem to be an option. I am having a very hard time emotionally. Can anyone give some gentle weaning tips for me? I won't be able to do it if it is traumatic. Her nursing schedule is as follows: 6:00 am wake up and nurse 10:00 am bottle of breast milk (work days) or nurse on off days 2:00 pm bottle of breast milk (work days) or nurse on off days 6:00 pm nurse 9:00 pm nurse and bed Sometimes she also asks to nurse at other random times.
    1 replies | 54 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    June 26th, 2017, 01:40 PM
    Yes there is no way around it, even when working perfectly lactation aids tend to be quite fiddly. But remember using one would only be temporary. Same with a shield, although if baby is latching and nursing ok without a shield, no need for the shield. Some babies have a harder time nursing or latching at certain times, also if baby starts nursing with normal frequency of 10-12 or more times in 24 hours, baby is not likely to need supplementing every time baby nurses. So occasional use of shield and/or lactation aid can also work. I found my old shield and tried it today, and it is pretty much as I remembered getting it on, it took some pushing and pulling as well as breast shaping to get it to "seal" properly. Also the whole thing except the very end of the tip needs to be inside out when you start. Shield fit is tricky as it has to fit both baby and mom! A shield is too small for mom if she cannot get her nipple into the tip, or if, when she does, when baby nurses, her nipple tissue is pulled through the holes (yes I have seen this happen, ow!) Otherwise it might be an ok fit for mom even if only the nipple goes into the tip- you probably would not want too much areola in there. When I just tried it, a small ring of areola around the base of my nipple went in but that is it. For baby it has to "fit" in the mouth obviously, but remember that when a baby nurses properly they take the nipple WAY far back into their mouth, so it can be surprising how much they can...
    8 replies | 310 view(s)
  • @llli*carm3's Avatar
    June 26th, 2017, 01:33 PM
    I think that if you're going to see any significant increase you'll need to really up your pumping frequency. More milk removal = more milk made, basically. A lot of moms have better success pumping with a higher end hospital grade pump, which can be available to rent. How much milk are you looking to donate? Ie, are you going to be her sole source of milk? If so, you'd have to really do the every 2 hours pumping thing I would think, in order to get that much. You can also try some herbal galactagogues, like Fenugreek and Goat's rue, though I don't have any personal experience with them. Oatmeal as well is supposed to be good for boosting supply. But really, I think the frequency of removal is what's going to make a difference. Just curious - does your friend have a history of low supply? I just wonder why she's looking for a donor ahead of time - if she's had issues in the past that she'd like help with, please let her know we're here to help :)
    2 replies | 62 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    June 26th, 2017, 01:22 PM
    Yes of course I am very much aware of the dismal way mothers who want to breastfeed are too often treated in hospitals. Sadly and incredibly, I have even encountered many women who had midwife assisted home or birth center births but were not given adequate breastfeeding assistance in the hours and days after baby was born. It is so sad to me that some mothers feel shame or guilt about not being able to nurse their babies when in fact they should be outraged at the lack of informed and respectful post natal assistance from the medical community. Instead mothers are at best given inadequate help and at worst actively undermined. It sounds like you experienced both. That is why I pointed out that you "should" have gotten more and better help early on. Every mother should, too many do not. So unfortunately it is up to us to advocate for ourselves and our babies and do what we can to get the help we need. I so wish it were easier but you can only do what you can do.
    8 replies | 310 view(s)
  • @llli*kelleena's Avatar
    June 26th, 2017, 12:33 PM
    Hi, I am the mom of a 3 year old that still nurses. We nurse when she wants to cuddle or have milky or naps and night time. I pump from time to time at work when I start to feel pressure. I have been asked by a mom that is due soon if I might be willing to donate. I have donated in the past when my LO was young and she knew this. I'd like to help her out however I just get very little when I pump. I am looking for recomendations to increase that or increase the lactation since my LO is probably not taking as much as she used to. I drink water only, no caffieen, eat healthy anything is greatly appreciated.
    2 replies | 62 view(s)
  • @llli*deja's Avatar
    June 26th, 2017, 03:31 AM
    Also, just to add, as far as help in the hospital goes, it borders on ridiculous. All these pamphlets about nursing and all that, they keep asking if you're nursing, but if you ask for help you won't get it. With my first I really needed help from them, the best I got was a nurse squeezing my nipple really hard and when a few drops showed she said - You have milk. It's not a lot but it's enough to feed the baby. And that was it. This time around everyone just ignored me since it's my second child. And even if I did ask for help, specific help regarding nursing, I don't think there's anyone there educated enough to help me. The best they did was lay the baby by me and put my breast in her mouth in the side lying position and bid me good night. That was after I asked they help me put her on the breast in a different position. She said it was night and time to sleep.
    8 replies | 310 view(s)
  • @llli*deja's Avatar
    June 26th, 2017, 03:21 AM
    Thank you soo much for all your words of support and for taking the time to write all this. Unfortunately support is something I don't have. The most support I get is from my husband, which is basically - he's all for me breastfeeding, he's not opposed to anything I want to try, he'll go buy what I need or drive us, but that's about it. It's kind of my concern, all this. And for others, from the experience with my first, I don't even dare say we're having problems with breastfeeding again. I'll try some more with the shield, I did most of what you described, bit maybe need to stuff the nipple a bit more in. I did try once more later on, but it was the same. She didn't really latch on to it, didn't want to even try more than once, and it kept bending on me. I'll take them with me to the LC consult. I have two sets of Avent shields in two sizes. The small ones look to be better but when I put them on, just the nipple fits in and the feeling is again as if the baby is sucking on just the nipple so I guess it's too small. The standard one is huge in her mouth but it's probably the right size for me. Last night I somehow got her to latch and ventured to try the tube in her mouth. She did flinch a bit but didn't protest. It was all so clumsy, the tube kept falling off, the latch felt shallow and weak, the tube was far too short for that but at least now I know it is possible.
    8 replies | 310 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    June 25th, 2017, 11:41 PM
    Wow honey this has not been your year. I am so sorry for your loss. So, you had a baby, you all got sick, you broke your ankle, your dad dies suddenly...and you moved house...all in the space of a few months? Wow. Well, if anyone looks at you cross-eyed about bottles you have my permission to pour it over their head! I think your plan sounds good. I think there are many things that may have caused the decrease, but usually there is really only two main ways to make it increase, and that is frequent and effective milk removal and galactagogues. (And do not forget hydration!) I do not know what a low carb diet does, I suppose that is for the PCOS? I once saw a talk on PCOS at a lactation conference and the person said fish oil (like you take as a supplement) is helpful, but I forget why. The thing about upping production with milk removal is to do it as often as you can, meaning, as often as you can that works for you. From what I have read about it, frequency of milk removal is more key in increasing production than is how "empty" the breast is made, but that is important too. That is why moms are told to pump after nursing. But that is just not a convenient time to pump for many moms, or mom does not have time to pump until no more milk is coming etc. So, that is not the only choice. In other words sometimes it is better to pump when most convenient so that you can pump more often, even if those sessions are short. The book Making More Milk has many tips for...
    6 replies | 183 view(s)
  • @llli*jhart's Avatar
    June 25th, 2017, 10:06 PM
    Yes, I think the stress from the ankle must have triggered the unusually long mastitis. Also the whole family was recovering from norovirus, so just generally I was feeling off my game. And then about two weeks after the mastitis, my father died unexpectedly. The baby and I went home for the funeral. I didn't take the pump with me but should've because that's when the formula supplementation really took off. It wasn't until I got home again, fully a month after the mastitis, that I was able to start trying to build my supply again. Talking to the IBCLC today, it sounded like it may have just been too long between when my supply first dropped and when I started pumping. No one is treating me for PCOS. We've recently moved. So my current plan is: - low carb diet - try to get hold of some domperidone, which the IBCLC suggested - continue pumping - try this approach for three or so weeks and then reevaluate
    6 replies | 183 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    June 25th, 2017, 03:54 PM
    Ha ha, yes, I get it. Ok you broke your ankle? Goodness. I cannot even imagine! I wonder if the stress of that could also have played a part? I only had mastitis with one of my kids, (but three times) the first time I also thought I got through it without antibiotics and then a few days later, wham. Sometimes to recover the body needs more help. If you feel fully recovered no reason to worry about it now, I am just thinking for the future. I get wanting to avoid abs of course. Who is treating you for the PCOS? maybe it would help to get tested now to see if the issue is likely to be hormone related. You would need a doctor to prescribe a pharmaceutical galactagogue. I think most moms get them from their ob but any doctor could prescribe. Unfortunately many will not. But it depends on where you live and on your doctor. If you want to learn more about this here is a little info, and you can research more as you like: http://www.breastfeedingonline.com/reglan.shtml#sthash.DvHtOaxN.dpbs
    6 replies | 183 view(s)
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