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  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 07:23 PM
    Yes the increase in nursing can be on evenings, over night and days off. Sorry if I was not clear about that. Many moms find that a "nursing vacation" where they hang out with baby for anywhere from several hours to a couple days doing not much except cuddling and relaxing and encouraging baby to nurse more will give production a nice jumpstart. If your job does not allow you time to pump during the day, you can even increase milk removal at work by learning hand expressing and doing that quickly during a break. No need to express much at all, no need to even save the milk. It is just about giving your body the message to increase production. But if you can get baby nursing more often at home that is likely to be enough to increase production enough that baby is happier when nursing.
    5 replies | 104 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 03:01 PM
    Even if more daytime nursing/pumping isn't possible, supply can be increased by nursing/pumping more during the hours when you are home with your baby. Aside from more frequent milk removal, galactogogues may help, but there is nothing that will be even 1/2 as effective as more nursing/pumping. I wish there were a different answer!
    5 replies | 104 view(s)
  • @llli*beautybecomes's Avatar
    Today, 01:41 PM
    Thanks for all the brilliant replies. I believe it's an issue of reoccurance. It comes and goes after she has received treatment. I even mentioned to the DOC about the treatment for me needs to be more than one dose and he just argued with me. (I live in Ireland- worst breastfeeding rates in the entire western world...I feel there is a huge lack of education re breastfeeding) I'm at the point I may book another consultant with a LC. I used one when she was only three months and tongue tie. Or perhaps a derm. I really don't want to wean her. I know in my heart she isn't ready and to be truly honest neither am I. As for the night feeds....yea I have faced a lot of judgement in that regard from her doc amount others. But it comforts her at night so I'll just keep doing what works.
    4 replies | 134 view(s)
  • @llli*djs.mom's Avatar
    Today, 09:38 AM
    Also a lot women pump wean at a year or right after and their supply doesn't suffer and they just continue to breastfeed while together. Without supplementing with cow's milk. I went back to work at the 14 month point after being home full time up until that point. There was no where to pump. And while my breasts were very very full I didn't lose my supply. We continued to nurse on demand while together and he wasn't interested in cow's milk. So he drank water while away from me and solids. He was an avid eater by the year point and I didn't need to supplement with cow's milk and I didn't lose my supply. He did eat cheese and would dip stuff in yogurt. So some dairy. But no milk.
    3 replies | 102 view(s)
  • @llli*kaitlynt's Avatar
    Today, 08:13 AM
    thanks for your replies! unfortunately, nursing and/or pumping during the day are just not possible...i work outside the home, and my employer doesn't really provide time to pump after 1 year. outside of more frequent milk removal, is anything else possible?
    5 replies | 104 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 06:04 AM
    Also, where is baby sleeping- in bed with you, in a cot in your room, or in his own room?
    2 replies | 129 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 06:03 AM
    :ita with all the above.
    4 replies | 125 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 06:00 AM
    :ita with the PP! I know this is exhausting, but I promise there is an end to it! I nursed and pumped with my firstborn and while it seemed like an eternity at the time, I look back and it was just 3 months. Pretty short in relation to my whole life.
    2 replies | 137 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 05:57 AM
    :ita with the PP. I strongly second her suggestion to avoid the bottle as much as possible. If you sense a bottle dependency developing, now is the time to nip it in the bud!
    2 replies | 140 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 05:55 AM
    More prominent veins is a normal feature of the breastfeeding breast. My guess is that the vein becomes more visible during a letdown because of all the milk moving through the breast and physically pushing that vein closer to the surface of the skin.
    1 replies | 92 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 05:52 AM
    :ita with the PP. This would be a great time to talk to your employer. You might want to give your post-1-year pumping plans a kind of soft sell- perhaps "I have been working on reducing my number of pump sessions but the process is taking more time than I thought, so is it possible to find continued pump breaks in my schedule?" They don't need to know how hard you're working on reducing your pump sessions! ;) You could certainly take the route of keeping this a secret, but if you don't have to... Plenty of people do pump at work after a year, though the number is probably pretty small. Whether or not cow's milk is okay for babies- and for humans in general- is a matter of debate. You run into issues like "Is it ethical to consume cow's milk, given what the beef/dairy industry does to the planet?" and "Is the nutrition found in cow's milk really better than that derived from plants?" and "What animal milk is closest to human milk?" I think what we can all agree on is that humans, being omnivores and very flexible in their diets- are generally just fine consuming cow's milk. If you do give your baby cow's milk, you should give her a whole milk product, because she does need fat in her diet and animal milk is often a very important source of the necessary nutrients. In addition, you do not need to give her milk per se; yogurt or cheese are good alternatives. Organic/non-organic is another matter of debate, as is the difference between milk from cows...
    3 replies | 102 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 05:29 AM
    :ita The key to increased supply is removing more milk from the breast at more frequent intervals. Nurse more or pump more!
    5 replies | 104 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 05:25 AM
    How old is your baby now? I am curious because I know my nursing aversion started around 2.5 years... And it definitely hastened the end of breastfeeding for me and my kids, but I didn't think of that as an "unnatural" weaning. My body/mind was telling me something, and that was natural! When I was really ready to be done, I found that countdowns helped a lot. What that meant was that when bedtime came and my kids were nursing, I would tell them they could nurse for the length of a song or until I counted to ten. I could handle that much nursing. And I definitely did not allow side-switching. 100 back-and-forth switches would have driven me insane! For milk-free bedtimes, the best strategy I found was having someone else step in. I would nurse the baby quickly- for the 10 count or length of a song- and then have my husband come in to take over the going-to-sleep process. Mommy does not need to do it all! You have been putting your baby to sleep very efficiently for months and months- but he's old enough now for someone else to step in and shoulder part of the work.
    1 replies | 93 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 05:16 AM
    It's normal for some people to need to use a lubricating oil when pumping. The shields are created in standard sizes, but humans don't come standard. Definitely decide if a shield is right based on feel and efficacy of the pump instead of look. Again, humans don't come standard and while some moms are only going to see nipple in the tube, it's also normal for the areola to be drawn into the tube. I would be very cautious about friction causing a red ring. Suction is probably less damaging than friction, when it comes to causing blisters or other forms of skin breakdown.
    3 replies | 177 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:08 PM
    It is possible to increase milk production at any point. Mothers have relactated after years of not nursing and even women who have never been pregnant have managed to make milk. So yes, it is possible. Whether an individual mom in a specific situation can increase her milk production is unknowable. Since your baby is still nursing and presumably you once had a "full" milk production (meaning baby lived on and grew normally on your milk only for some period of time) then your chances of increasing your milk production are quite good. First you want to be sure there is nothing going on with you physically that has reduced your production- such as pregnancy or taking hormone based birth control. What has probably happened is that by nursing only twice a day, and no longer pumping, your body has received the message that it is time to reduce milk production to very little and has followed suit. Now for some moms and babies, twice a day or so nursing can continue for some time. But this is more common for older nurselings of two years old or more, who are nursing more for the comfort than for the milk. For a baby close to a year old, they are typically expecting there to be more milk and so they may object to it being so little. This could even lead to full out breast refusal before you are ready to wean entirely. To increase milk production, first you have to tell your body that it needs to make more milk. This is achieved by taking milk out of the breast with...
    5 replies | 104 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:39 PM
    Are you sure your work is going to give you a hard time about continuing to pump? If your employer has been amazing about you pumping so far, I would not assume they will not be after your baby is a year old. Yes it is true some of the laws do not protect pumping past one year. But the fact is none of these laws actually has an enforcement provision, and also moms were arranging with their employers pumping in the workplace long before there were any laws about it. Lots of people pump past a year. There is not some magical switch that makes it "ok" to no longer pump after this point. Many moms no longer want to pump after a year, and so they wean themselves off the pump sometime after a year and only nurse. But this is going to have some impact on milk production and also, of course, means baby will not get your milk anymore during the work day. Most people think this is OK because the AAP says babies should nurse to 1 year. But in fact what the AAP actually says is baby should nurse until at least one year. And the world health organization says at least 2 years. If a mom is done pumping, that is one thing. Pumping is really hard for many moms and making it to a year is an amazing milestone. But if mom is not yet ready to stop pumping, why should she? There is no reason. If you are pumping 4 times a day at this point, you are most likely not going to be able to stop pumping cold turkey anyway. Doing so might leave you uncomfortable or even ill. It is always safer...
    3 replies | 102 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:23 PM
    It sounds to me that you do not really have mixed feelings- it sounds like you are sure you are done and want son to be done as well? If that is the case, understandably you want the process to be gentle, so maybe you are having a hard time being as firm as needed- which is very hard to do, in my experience, but sometimes necessary when mom is done but child is hanging on. In my experience This is the point where another parent or other caring and patient adult in the house can be a big help. Because when you have to just say no, it helps to have an attractive alternative and having a whole other person to send the child to is a good alternative. But if or when that is not possible, maybe think of some other alternative to offer. When my kids did those forever morning nursing sessions and I wanted them to stop, I would say I had to get up to pee and then I would not get back into bed. I would say "let's go make breakfast" and in general indicate it was time to get up and start the day, even if it meant getting up and leaving them there so they understood I meant business. If your child has a favorite food or drink you can offer that, or if they like to "help' you in the kitchen do that, or try whatever might distract/redirect them. If rocking at night is getting too exhausting, we have done gentle backrubs, holding hands, that kind of thing to comfort a child into sleep. With my oldest, I could get him settled down by telling him long kind of boring stories....
    1 replies | 112 view(s)
  • @llli*kaitlynt's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:25 PM
    hi all, i'm currently nursing my 13 month old twice a day, first thing in the morning and before bed (and before her afternoon nap on the weekends). in the last month, i've weaned off the pump at work, and my gal takes 1/2 whole milk, 1/2 frozen milk during the day to use up my freezer stash (slowly increasing whole milk until the stash is gone). i am very happy and eager for this to continue for as long as she wants, but my supply seems to be dwindling! sometimes she seems upset and comes off crying, other times she tugs and pulls while nursing, as if to say, "c'mon guys!" my question is, is it possible to increase supply after 1 year, or is it pretty well set at this point? any tips, if it is possible? pumping during the day is no longer an option. thank you!
    5 replies | 104 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:50 PM
    How often does baby poop and what does it look like generally speaking?
    2 replies | 129 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:48 PM
    Around five months is an age where many babies start waking more often wanting to nurse more often and generally acting fussier at the breast. Usually this is entirely normal does not mean anything is wrong. Milk production does ebb and flow throughout the day this is true of all mothers for the whole time that they nurse. But this does not mean mom does not make enough milk. Either a mother makes enough milk for her baby to gain normally or she doesn't - there's no such thing as only nighttime low milk production. As far as baby taking the bottle I would say it's impossible to know what if anything that means. I would suggest that bottles given instead of nursing usually lead to more problems overall. Unless your baby needs the bottles to gain normally I would try to avoid them. Kelly mom has a good article called help my baby won't nurse which offer some ideas for when the baby seems to need to nurse but won't.
    2 replies | 140 view(s)
  • @llli*ksmom3's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:28 PM
    So for a couple months now while nursing on my right side on the left side of my nipple there is like a vein (like the fleshy part next to my nipple) that sticks out when my milk lets down and sometimes for a few minutes after while my 4 month old is breastfeeding. I don't remember this happening before a couple months ago or with my other two kids but I was wondering if this is normal? It doesn't hurt or anything just seems strange? I've had more problems this time nursing, beginning nipple pains, thrush and I think we are almost to a good point now where everything is going well. So I just want to see if anyone else has had this? Thanks!
    1 replies | 92 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:57 AM
    Sorry I just re-read this and realized you said smoothies, not cookies. Again it depends on what is in the smoothy and in what dose, but still I wanted to correct my mistake there. If your baby is regularly going about 3-4 hours between nursing sessions, truly the most effective and (usually, although every situation is different) easiest way to increase milk production, milk intake, and weight gain is to encourage baby to nurse more often. Of course some 6 month olds are fine on that frequency but on the other hand, it does not take much breastmilk to increase weight gain to closer to average when it is slightly below that. Just one or two additional nursing sessions a day can make a big difference. If doctor is concerned enough they want another weight check in 6 weeks, that is a good reason to try that. Even if solids are only during your work day, they can impact the whole day of nursing just as overfeeding with bottles can. Given the weight gain concern I am not going to suggest reduce solids, but again I would suggest encouraging baby to nurse more often when you are with baby. Pumping a little more when at work, if and when you can, is also a good idea if you have any concerns about milk production now or for the future. But the need to do this can be offset to some degree if baby nurses more often. The website and book Breastfeeding in Combat Boots is written for nursing moms in the military but has ideas for any pumping mom with a career that makes pumping...
    4 replies | 125 view(s)
  • @llli*dani425's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:49 AM
    I have been breastfeeding for 11 months. I work outside my house as well as pump at work. I work for the state so my employer has been amazing about me having to pump. I definitely can keep up with my work as well. I am also currently making enough at work pumping 4 times a day for my daughter to be fed all day!! Thank GOD! :clap I have a bit of a dilemma. I am coming up on a year and from what I've read, I am not covered after a year to pump at work. I do not want to stop breastfeeding and I don't mind supplementing with cow's milk, if my daughter will take it. So I guess my question is has anyone ever pumped at work past a year? Could I keep it a secret from my boss and just try to work it in a couple times a day vs 4 times a day now?? Is cow's milk really ok for babies?? Is there milk that is better? Organic? Skim? 2%?:confused::confused::confused: I haven't spoke to my daughters doctor, but I have spoke with a lactation consultant and she wants me to pump, basically all day, and save up my milk for after a year. I'm sure if any of you have been there, yall know, it's not easy to pump/breastfeed all day. I appreciate everyone's responses and support.:love p.s. my daughter is eating solids, however, she doesn't really like baby food. :lol :D
    3 replies | 102 view(s)
  • @llli*bfulmer's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:41 AM
    Hi. Just to be clear, your baby is now 6 months old, correct? You say 6 week checkup but I know from your history baby is older than that! If baby is 6 months old, I am not sure what the concern is. "Drops" in percentile as well as "jumps" in percentile for both weight and height growth are common and usually entirely normal. Did your pediatrician express concern about your baby's gain? It would help to know how often overall baby nurses. A 6 month old baby is (hopefully) still getting all of their nutrition from breastmilk, even if the introduction to solids has begun. So most 6 month olds will still nurse (or have a bottle) 8-12 times in 24 hours.
    4 replies | 125 view(s)
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