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  • @llli*julienne02's Avatar
    Today, 03:05 PM
    Hello, I am hoping for some suggestions. My 9 month old has happily taken a bottle since I went back to work at 4.5 months, but the last couple weeks has been not very interested, some days only eating two instead of three. Today he is pretty much refusing it altogether. He seems interested but takes a couple sips and then doesn't want it. My husband has also tried the milk in a sippy cup today. He doesn't eat solids yet (not interested). He figured out how to scoot around on his belly a few weeks ago. I am just wondering if this might be a phase or he has just decided he doesn't want a bottle anymore at all? He nurses fine when I am home, every hour and half or two hours. Suggestions on how to get him to eat? He is not a big baby, under 10th percentile in weight.
    0 replies | 3 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 01:32 PM
    Spit up is normal. Pain while spitting up might indicate reflux. Crying while nursing could indicate any number of things. Very young babies should probably not be ingesting anything other than breastmilk, infant formula (if they are not breastfed) or medicines approved by doctor. I know people give their babies gripe water for colic, I did myself with my oldest, and I assume that is similar to what is in this "tea?" But even with the gripe water, the recommended dose was so much it was potentially a problem if given too often. (could fill baby up on something with no nutrients.) Later I learned research does not indicate gripe water helps with digestive issues. Neither do gas drops. There is some evidence probiotics help in some cases. Additionally, herbal ingredients are not always "safe." In fact, due to lack of regulation I would be very cautious about direct ingestion of any herbal product for a very young child. For example: http://www.webmd.com/parenting/baby/news/20041112/herbal-tea-for-infant-colic-unsafe This does not mean a nursing mom should not take a medicinal herbs. Many moms take herbal galagtagogues and their milk is perfectly safe for baby. But whenever medicinal herbs are used, it is important to research the potential side effects. Interestingly I cannot find an ingredient list on that baby tea website. Plenty of misinformation about colic, infant behavior and breastmilk though.
    3 replies | 189 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 01:12 PM
    Hi world wanderer. Mommal has not been able to check on the forum as much lately due to busy life and probably missed your response, and I missed it too. Since it has been a couple of weeks, can you tell us what is going on now? Any changes from when you last posted? Thanks.
    5 replies | 184 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 01:08 PM
    Most commonly, those are signs that the milk flow is a little fast for baby. Things that help with fast letdown- try leaning back position (baby kind of on top) to nurse, encourage baby to nurse more often, (usually very helpful.) Or, you can try taking baby off when baby does this and let milk flow into a cloth for a few moments then put baby back on, and/or express a little milk before baby nurses. You also can just let baby figure it out. It depends how much it is really bothering baby. Fast flow is something your baby can usually learn to deal with just fine, unless it is really fast or baby has some kind of latch or sucking problem.
    11 replies | 438 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 11:42 AM
    Unfortunately, it is entirely possible tongue tie was "missed" by your doctor. Many doctors think that tongue tie does not matter in infancy and that it would only be an issue if speech or eating issues occurred later. You can find info online about tongue tie and breastfeeding but it is a tricky area because diagnoses is tricky (there are different types of tongue tie that cause nursing pain) and also treatment does not always help with nursing pain. But if you see another LC you two can talk about that. I think seeing someone else makes sense if that is possible. I am not saying your first LC was wrong, but it does sound like there was a lack of communication there and your instincts and the facts seem to point to a latch issue, so that is what you would want your LC to be working with you on at least until every other possibility has been addressed. While a LC can certainly gather information while watching a baby nurse, there is no way to tell a latch is "fine" ONLY by how it looks when baby nurses. Here is an article that suggests what should happen at a consult with an LC: http://www.cwgenna.com/lconsult.html The LC who wrote that is an expert on latch issues so you can poke around her site and see if anything helps. Have you tried nursing in a leaning back position- in a relaxed, supported position, leaning back for example, against the couch back or a pile of pillows, with baby more on top of you? This type of positioning often helps a good deal with...
    4 replies | 124 view(s)
  • @llli*vedimama's Avatar
    Today, 11:21 AM
    While feeding, sometimes she coughs and adjusts her throat a lot. Seems like she has some discomfort doing that. What could the reason be? sometimes after a while after feeding she makes gagging in the mouth type actions , but nothing happens/comes out
    11 replies | 438 view(s)
  • @llli*tobysmom's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:48 PM
    (I should clarify that I said baby doesn't have a tongue tie... rather I don't think baby has a tongue tie. I asked the doctor to check and was told there wasn't one. Could be that something was missed but I would hope not.)
    4 replies | 124 view(s)
  • @llli*tobysmom's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:31 PM
    Thank you so much for the detailed reply! That's exactly what I was thinking about the latch which is why I went to see the lactation consultant--I was surprised when she didn't see a problem after watching baby eat and I wasn't sure what to say in response to the nipple/palate comment. I actually feel better because it sounds like this is something I can still work on without having to move backwards---I think maybe I will seek out a different LC for another try at help. I'll also check into the cultures to rule out anything bacterial--I didn't realize that can be there without any big symptoms. I don't think it's an issue of being too full--sometimes I am too full first thing in the morning because baby's sleep patterns haven't gotten predictable yet, but it doesn't seem to be an issue for baby eating then and my supply is well regulated during the day. Baby does not have a tongue tie. As far as working on latch, I've tried the basic positions--cradle, cross cradle, side lying, football. Cradle is the worst for pain and football is the best (if not comfortable at least more bearable). So I've been focusing on trying to make that one work and follow videos on proper latch. Baby also first latched without the shield in the football position so I think maybe that one allows him a better hold. I have trouble getting it to work when out and about though so often find myself trying to deal with cross cradle or be stuck on my couch. :/ I've done the breast sandwich. ...
    4 replies | 124 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:25 PM
    Hi tobysmom, I am sorry you are having this problem. Is it possible there was a misunderstanding here? Nipples becoming cracked and sore is almost always a sign of a latch problem. The nipple shape you are seeing after your baby nurses is also a common indication of shallow latch. Also, if the problem is not latch, why are you being told to pump to elongate the nipple? That is a method to improve latch. It certainly has no other purpose. Also, if your nipple is "too short" again the only problem with that, is it might cause a poor latch! I mean, too short for what? This means, too short for baby to latch onto properly! I have a question with this idea I will get into below, but that is what 'too short' would mean. As far as your baby having a hard palate, I have no idea what this means. All babies like all adults have both a soft and hard palate. The trick with latch is to get the nipple back to the soft palate. And this can happen even with short nipples and with brand newborns with tiny mouths so it can certainly happen if your baby is 4 months old.
    4 replies | 124 view(s)
  • @llli*tobysmom's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:40 PM
    First time mom with a four month old baby. Exclusively pumped for six weeks following a NICU stay at birth (born a month early), then transitioned to a nipple shield eventually because baby would not latch without it. At 15 weeks, baby all of sudden latched without the shield and we were elated! :clap Baby has been nursing without the shield for three weeks and is doing great--weight gain is good, lactation consultants have confirmed he is eating 70-100 ml each feeding, which is plenty, and baby seems happy and more comforted by the breast. Went from 30 minute feedings to being done in 8-10min. However...mama is not doing well. Without the shield I have been having extreme nipple soreness. It is worse on one side than the other, and worst with the initial latch although it hurts throughout the nursing session on both sides. Both nipples are cracked. On the side with the most pain the nipple often is lipstick shaped or a little flat after nursing, which made me question the latch but I went to the lactation consultant this week and they thought the latch looked good and that wasn't the issue. Suggestions were to pump 5 minutes before each feeding to elongate the nipple (apparently I have a fairly short small nipple and baby has a hard palate) or to go back to using the shield. I'm resisting the idea of pumping because of the logistics involved and making it more difficult to feed baby on demand, plus washing all those pump pieces. Would hate to go back to the nipple shield...
    4 replies | 124 view(s)
  • @llli*mmomm1's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:58 AM
    During the day, pump every 2 to 3 hours. During the night, get up and pump no later than every 4 hours. This happens a lot to moms that exclusively pump. You definitely need to try something herbal. Try drinking healthy nursing tea. It has a combination of herbs. By drinking it I was able to pump 4 to 5 ounces at a time instead of 1/2 ounce. Make sure to pump often and give anything you try time to work. Hang in there!
    5 replies | 184 view(s)
  • @llli*mmomm1's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:54 AM
    my baby had reflux and he got so bad he would cry in the middle of a feeding, and i am talking CRYING hysterically the doctor put him on Prilosec and it seemed to be working. but he still was spiting up a lot but at least the crying stopped. the real difference made by baby magic tea and now his symptoms almost vanish!!!
    3 replies | 189 view(s)
  • @llli*crr.2017's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:42 AM
    Okay, thank you.
    20 replies | 913 view(s)
  • @llli*crr.2017's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:41 AM
    Thank you.
    2 replies | 146 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    April 21st, 2017, 10:14 PM
    I am sorry to say it again, but this again sounds normal! This is how newborns behave. There is nothing wrong with a baby who behaves this way. You, mom, may need and can get breaks. Someone else can take your baby and comfort them while you get a break. I found what worked well for my family is I nursed baby then my husband took baby and "walked baby down". Eventually we just got him his own sling to wear baby in so we did not have to keep adjusting the one for our different bodies. Evenings were spent playing "pass the baby." This arrangement or something similar is pretty typical especially during the early months.
    2 replies | 146 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    April 21st, 2017, 10:09 PM
    This all sounds pretty normal. When healthy babies this age scream for hours and will not even comfort by nursing, that is probably colic. There is not much you can do about colic except try everything you can think of and see if anything helps. Colic is difficult but temporary. These tip sheets both have ideas that may help: http://www.llli.org/docs/0000000000000001WAB/WAB_Tear_sheet_Toolkit/09_fussybabyideas.pdf and http://www.llli.org/docs/0000000000000001WAB/WAB_Tear_sheet_Toolkit/10_what_about_partners.pdf
    20 replies | 913 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    April 21st, 2017, 01:54 PM
    If your baby is gaining that quickly you are fine as that is above average (nothing wrong with above average, but you certainly need not worry baby is not getting enough in that case.) Fluctuations in gain rate day to day or week to week are entirely 100% normal. Weight gain is just not something that would ever be precisely this or that per day or week. Additionally, be prepared for the fact that weight gain rate gets slower and slower as a baby ages. If babies kept gaining at the newborn rate they would be giants by the time they were 2. At this point you can stop weighing baby so much! Your milk production probably needs to ramp down somewhat, as you are making a little more than baby needs at this point. In that case milk production reducing is normal and expected. The more immediate issue with engorgement is that it might lead to plugs or even mastitis. If you are uncomfortable or getting hard, and baby will not nurse, fine to hand express a little milk for your own comfort. If hand expression is not working, you can pump but again, just enough to relieve the engorgement- this would be a time to pump "to comfort" and not to "empty" the breasts. That way you are getting milk out to help with your health and comfort, but not so much telling your body to make more. If you can get baby to nurse when you feel this way, that is usually the easiest and best option. It sounds like things are going very well so yes, if you know that baby will need to take bottles at...
    10 replies | 786 view(s)
  • @llli*crr.2017's Avatar
    April 21st, 2017, 01:03 PM
    My 1 month old will fall asleep at the breast sometimes after 5 minutes, sometimes after 20. She will stay asleep for awhile and then wale up screaming like she's still hungry. How do you know when they are done? Feedings take forever and I feel like I always have my boob in her mouth.. please help
    2 replies | 146 view(s)
  • @llli*margutte's Avatar
    April 21st, 2017, 05:46 AM
    Hi Maddie, thanks again for taking the time to answer me. So far, it's going well. I have pumed every other day for a week an then stopped completely five days ago, while keeping track of weight an milk intake. He has been growing well in the meantime, about 10 ounces a week, although his weight fluctuates from day to day, sometimes going sllightly down, which is a little bit scary. He always recovered so far, though. Also, I have been quite engorged all day yesterday, I hope my supply is not starting to go down too much. Might this be the time to offer him a bottle occasionally, to get him used to it, so that he does not refuse it later? He has not seen a bottle for a month exactly. How about a pacifier? He started being quite cranky in the evening, refusing the breast and not sleeping for two hours or so, and it would perhaps help.
    10 replies | 786 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    April 20th, 2017, 09:10 PM
    My third did the same thing! Awful, several times a nursing session biting that lasted way longer than my other kid who bit (first was a clamper but not an intentional biter.) I forget when this was...I think it started at 8 or 9 months. While it happened, I did not know what to do. I mean she really hurt me sometimes. I even got injured pretty bad once. Sometimes all I could do was take her off and go cry somewhere, it hurt that much. Anyway, it finally stopped. I did not do anything magic to make it stop, there was no reason, it just stopped. She is 4 now and still nurses! I agree, the idea biting means a child is weaning never made any sense to me. A weaning child can just stop nursing. They do not need to bite! (Also weaning is usually gradual, not a sudden stop.) I also never thought my baby biting was caused by teething. She did not bite anything else that I recall. So I am really sorry, I do not have advice about the biting. There are a few reasons babies bite and ideas for what to do about it, kellymom covers them all really well so you can check to see if you missed anything. But in my personal experience this can be just a phase.
    1 replies | 151 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    April 20th, 2017, 08:55 PM
    This sounds like colic, which can be hard to live through but is common and normal and temporary. It is also something of a mystery, because there is not one identifiable cause that includes all babies who have this behavior. There are many tips on how to help a baby who has colic. What seems to work the most is changing sensory input (exposing baby to different sounds, movement, environment, etc) What I have found is you just try whatever you can and some things work some of the time, but usually nothing works all the time or for very long. I am not sure what "gas build up" means? Lower intestinal gas is a normal result of food digestion, and the gas has to come out by passing gas. Upper GI gas is why baby might need to burp. If someone has trapped gas, either upper or lower, it may cause a pain, and eliminating the gas is what helps it feel better. For a baby, changing baby's position in various ways is probably the best way to help them pass gas. Massage may help too, but I learned the hard way to not lay my baby down to do a massage, as this made him way more miserable! Luckily babies are easy to massage while being held. Here is a good fussy baby tip sheet: http://www.llli.org/docs/0000000000000001WAB/WAB_Tear_sheet_Toolkit/09_fussybabyideas.pdf
    11 replies | 438 view(s)
  • @llli*vedimama's Avatar
    April 20th, 2017, 08:32 PM
    She is generally normal after the spit up. Sometimes cries for a few minutes but otherwise goes back to being herself. Since past few days we have been noticing she starts crying in the evening at around 7 pm. and nothing seems to pacify her. I have tried feeding her to calm her but that too doesn't work. She nurses and then again starts crying. Could this be due to gas build up? We give Gripe water which seems to work sometimes as she then calms down after awhile and goes to sleep.
    11 replies | 438 view(s)
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