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  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 01:34 PM
    Welcome to the forum and congratulations on the new baby! I agree 100% that your doctor's advice makes no sense. There is no evidence that shows that less frequent feedings increases weight gain. Quite the opposite! And there is no truth in the statement that babies only get milk during the first 10 minutes at the breast. And offering water in a bottle or a pacifier in order to hold a baby longer between feedings is just ridiculous- filling the baby up with a calorie-free substance or offering a paci instead of nursing her isn't going to make her gain weight! Basically, I think your gut is gving you good advice and your pediatrician isn't. That being said, I think you do want to do the following: 1. Make sure proper weighing procedure is followed every time. Baby should always be weighed in the nude, using the same scale. 2. Go and see a lactation consultant. Nursing doesn't hurt and that suggests that your baby has a good latch. But it's possible that there's something that could be tweaked here, to improve baby's intake. 3. When you go and see the lactation consultant, make sure she does a weigh-feed-weigh measurement on the baby, to get a sense of how much baby is taking in over the course of a feeding- just be aware that a single weigh-feed-weigh is only a snapshot, not a true picture of how much your baby takes in while nursing. 4. Consider renting your own professional baby scale, so that you can do weigh-feed-weigh measurements at home. A few...
    1 replies | 9 view(s)
  • @llli*birdiesmama's Avatar
    Today, 11:59 AM
    Hi: My daughter just turned 1 month the day before yesterday. She was born after a normal pregnancy and 100% natural (hospital) delivery, no IV, no induction, my water broke on its own 10 days prior to her "due date" and she came out tiny at 5 lbs 4 oz, but totally healthy and there have been no concerns, that is, until 3 weigh-ins ago (about a week and a half ago)... Birth weight: 5lbs 4 oz Weight before going home 2 days later: 4 lbs 5 oz First Dr. appt. 2 days later: 4 lbs 11 oz (gained 3 oz in 3 days) 2nd Dr. appt. 3 days later: 4lbs 14 oz (gained 3 oz in 3 days) 3rd appt. 1 week later: 5 lbs 4 oz (BACK TO BIRTH WEIGHT, gained 6 oz in 1 week) 4th appt. 1 week later: 5 lbs 7 oz (gained 3 oz in 1 week, Dr. is concerned this week)
    1 replies | 9 view(s)
  • @llli*chelliesue's Avatar
    Today, 11:28 AM
    I went ahead and requested the Medela. I liked my Ameda but it took forever sometimes it seemed to pump. I was leaning towards the Hygeia but looking into it there were some issues with it. Thanks for the help!!!
    2 replies | 116 view(s)
  • @llli*lllmeg's Avatar
    Today, 10:47 AM
    Many great ideas above. Is there La Leche League or any other breastfeeding support groups near where you are? Getting support wherever you can is so important. It is very very early days. There is a very good chance you will be able to breastfeed your baby. No reason to feel guilty if you do not, but if this is something you want for yourself and your child, you both deserve your efforts to make it happen.
    5 replies | 168 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 09:34 AM
    :ita My guess is that you don't live in a single room mud hut, so... How about the kitchen? Living room? Guest room? Shower stall? Get creative and you could have fun with this!!!
    4 replies | 80 view(s)
  • @llli*lllmeg's Avatar
    Today, 09:19 AM
    When it was time to move my oldest son to his own bed, it helped to start with own bed for naps, first. When we knew he could sleep ok alone during the day, we were all more comfortable having him do so for nights. He loved Thomas the Train so we bought an inexpensive Thomas the Train pillowcase and blanket, for his bed only, and that made his own bed more appealing. We had him go to sleep in his own bed at the start of the night, but then kept an 'open bed' policy if he woke in the middle of the night. this worked very well for us, but at the time our son was 3 and a half years old. A 19 month old is still very much a baby, and sleeping with mom is what feels normal to a child that age. Because biologically, that is normal. Lack of sleep? My husband sleeps much, much better since we started bedsharing, and this is a common experience. Would a larger bed possibly be a solution? If the other primary concern is opportunity for sex, bedsharing is simply not a barrier to this. Having kids at all makes alone time together more tricky, no matter where they sleep. But many bedsharing couples have complete sex lives, and the multiple children to prove it. Throughout history and around the world, whole families have been conceived and raised in single room dwellings. I am sure that if you and your husband use your imaginations, you will find a way.
    4 replies | 80 view(s)
  • @llli*rachiiee's Avatar
    Today, 09:09 AM
    Thank-you for your response :)
    4 replies | 80 view(s)
  • @llli*alphawoman's Avatar
    Today, 06:49 AM
    My son is now 2y9mo. Around 2.25, we bought a double mattress and put it directly on the floor in his room. I nurse him to sleep around 10pm, spend a few hours with DH, then rejoin DS for the night around midnight. He's even at the point where, after nursing, he can fall asleep by himself calmly. I made it clear that he only has to call me and I will come, and followed up with action. We nurse to sleep probably 5 days per week and do the self-settling 2 times on days when he's especially tired. I believe the process of independence is a gradual one.
    4 replies | 80 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 05:51 AM
    It's generally recommended that moms wait at least 4-6 weeks before introducing bottles and pumps into their nursing relationship. You want to make sure nursing is going really, really well before you add big variables. Especially when you have a known issue like oversupply. You're only looking to produce enough for the occasional outing- I'm thinking an hour or two, once a week? Does that sound about right? If so, you don't need a big freezer stash. You could simply express as needed, or follow the PP's advice, above, about pumping once a day or every few days. When you do go out, make sure your family is up on paced feeding techniques and that you bring a pump along on your outing, in case you take a lot longer than expected or get stuck somewhere without access to the baby.
    2 replies | 60 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Today, 05:12 AM
    Some babies need to be held in a particular position to latch correctly and others take to it quite naturally. The Kelly Mom Articles linked above are a good starting place. Make sure when you try to latch that you are calm about it and if she doesn't go for it right away, don't try to force it, try again later. You can't force a baby to breast feed. My LO during the first few weeks would latch onto anything even remotely resembling a nipple even if it was moving past him at speed, I got a few painful hickies when he latched onto the side of my breast or my arm instead of my nipple. If your LO still has her rooting reflex and the tendency to kick her feet into you then you might be able to let her do baby led latching. http://www.llli.org/btissue5pg04 As noted, you want to get pumping to build up your milk supply.
    5 replies | 168 view(s)
  • @llli*rachiiee's Avatar
    Today, 05:04 AM
    We have coslept since birth, she is now 19months. Honestly, I love it, but my husband does not because he can't get good sleep and wants our sex life back. I am sympathetic because he is the provider and needs good sleep to work and sex for a healthy relationship :lol . And she still night nurses but only for a reassurance of "I know you're still there". I have put a toddler bed in our room to make it easier to get up if she cries. She can make it a few hours in the bed but eventually realizes I'm not there and I should just lay down there with her BUT I bring her into our bed. And when she is in her bed, I can't sleep good because I just keep thinking "I know as soon as I get to sleep she will wake up" :banghead I KNOW it's not just her, but me that needs to learn to let her sleep in her big girl bed :cry but how?!?!?! Help:confused:
    4 replies | 80 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Today, 04:55 AM
    I find the SNS can be helpful in dealing with the "instant gratification" issue as long as you are not having huge problems with her latch. I have a 4 1/2 month old and am still struggling but I think acupuncture may be helping some with my "flow rate" and supply.
    6 replies | 148 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Today, 04:50 AM
    When you breastfeed, does your other breast leak? If so, start by collecting that bonus milk since simply catching that won't change your supply at all since it is happening without any other intervention. Also if you need to hand express to relieve any engorgement or when you let down to keep baby from choking, make a point of saving that milk for your stash instead of wasting it down the sink or into a towel. Otherwise my understanding is that most women might pump only once a day (like after the first morning feeding when their supply is usually highest) in order to build up a stash. I'm not sure how much this would impact your supply though, perhaps you might need to space it out so you are only pumping once every few days to keep from triggering your body to over produce. OR I've heard that hand expression without stimulating the nipples is less likely to trigger as much over production. If you are still on the edge of over production, you might not need many pumping sessions to actually build a few feeding buffer in your stash. Keep in mind you shouldn't need a very big stash since you only need as much as baby is likely to eat during your first outing and you will be pumping during that outing to replace what is used.
    2 replies | 60 view(s)
  • @llli*ananya's Avatar
    Today, 04:19 AM
    Hey!! congratz on your first baby and i appreciate you for the decision of breastfeeding. i have many ideas but am unable to explain,.. try this positions it may help you http://www.momjunction.com/articles/best-positions-to-ensure-that-your-baby-latches-correctly_0076096/
    5 replies | 168 view(s)
  • @llli*pteroglossus's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:52 PM
    To keep a good latch I used to have to keep making sure baby was tummy to tummy with me, otherwise she seemed to swivel around and the latch would get worse.
    9 replies | 243 view(s)
  • @llli*lllmeg's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:47 PM
    Supplement of four ounces each day is not much, so I also wonder if it is needed. It may be, it's just something to consider. I agree with pp, if you are supplementing any amount and not pumping or hand expressing at around that time, your milk production will not increase and may reduce. Newborn babies are gassy. All people are to some extent! A newborn is eating frequently and constantly digesting food, and this is going to create gas. This is seldom a health concern. I could see tugging as a possible sign baby needs help burping, however. I do not see your baby's behavior as a sign of reflux or growth spurt, but maybe I am missing something? For the tugging, First, I would suggest making sure any supplements are given in a breastfeeding supportive way. This means, supplementing at the breast if possible, and if not, cup feeding or using paced bottle feeding. http://www.llli.org/docs/0000000000000001WAB/WAB_Tear_sheet_Toolkit/22_bfabreastfedbaby.pdf I would also suggest trying different positions. For this issue, maybe try laid back and side lying? http://www.llli.org/faq/positioning.html If baby is perhaps reacting to a slowing of the milk flow, what about breast compressions? http://www.breastfeedinginc.ca/content.php?pagename=doc-BC
    2 replies | 97 view(s)
  • @llli*lllmeg's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:35 PM
    Yes I wondered if this was your concern. Fat does tend to get stuck to the sides of the container, but I very much doubt it would be enough to be a problem. You might find ideas for this issue in the work and pump forum.
    4 replies | 129 view(s)
  • @llli*lllmeg's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:27 PM
    Hi, so I had to run before and posted without completing one of my thoughts. What I was going to add was that, even if you can only pump 4 times a day, or even less, one thing you can know for sure is that will be better for milk production than not pumping/nursing at all. In other words, if that is what you can do, do that, and your baby will certainly get more of your breastmilk, for longer, than if you did not do that. Ok, so I understand your situation is unique with your 15 year old. Every situation is. My point was, even in the best of circumstances, newborn babies require lots and lots of time and energy. Way more than anyone will tell you, way more than anyone can imagine prior to having a baby, or remember later. I have had three children, and every time, I am amazed again at how incredibly time consuming and exhausting newborn care is. And most siblings, while they survive the experience, experience jealousy of and resentment about a new sibling. Lots of new moms have older kids, older kids with special needs, important jobs, aging parents, ill spouses, etc etc... I would never say they neglected their families because they focused their attention on their newborns. So I will not agree that you are neglecting anyone. That was my point. There are many ways to make pumping more manageable, but I don't know if you want those suggestions or not. If you do, it would help to know what your current pumping routine is now, including how much you pump and how...
    6 replies | 148 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:30 PM
    Call them and ask if they can call you if there is a cancellation! That is how I managed to get my LO in to have his lip/tongue tie corrected, they didn't have an opening for weeks but I told them to call me if any opening popped up. They called me the next day and we had to rush to get there is it was a 2 hr drive for us and the opening was in 3 hours, but we did it. As to everything else, I hear you about grieving about loosing or even the possibility of loosing the nursing relationship. I've been having supply and poor weight gain issues and my LO does have a flow preference for the bottle but trying to use the SNS all the time is hard etc..... Trying herbs and trying to get domperidone. Yesterday I saw an acupuncturist and I'm cautiously optimistic about the results. One idea is since right now you are terribly wound up about this, you could set yourself a date as a goal and re-evaluate then. Like perhaps when baby is 6 weeks old, if you haven't found solutions you could wean yourself off the pump. Or you could start weaning yourself off the pump now with the goal of being done by 6 weeks or so depending on if you are really willing to continue or not. However, you might want to hold out till after his tongue/lip tie condition gets looked at/corrected. Keep in mind the result will probably not be instant since baby will have spent a fair amount of time learning to use those muscles in the restricted state. Get help from an IBCLC or speech therapist who...
    6 replies | 148 view(s)
  • @llli*chylab15's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:24 PM
    I am going through a similar issue with my almost 3 month old. I am having milk issues because the hospital gave me wrong info and my daughter would not latch when she was born. She's latching now, but gets mad and screams because the milk isn't instant like the bottle. I am a slave to the pump but not producing much milk... My heart is still in it, I refuse to give in just yet! Hang in there, and keep trying to get him to the boob! It can be done. Extremely maddening, but possible!!
    6 replies | 148 view(s)
  • @llli*lvander's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:22 PM
    I recently got my oversupply issue under control by block feeding but now I want to work on building my freezer stash so that my husband and I can leave our 3 week old daughter with family every once in a while. How do I pump without causing my supply to raise too much again?
    2 replies | 60 view(s)
  • @llli*mammal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:23 PM
    Thank you, Meg. Let's see. I have talked to a LLL leader, and she was helpful and compassionate, but didn't really offer any ideas that the IBCLC and everyone else hadn't offered. She said situations like this are the kind that formula was made for and she has rarely seen a mother who tried harder than I have. Well, my 15-year-old was adopted from foster care and is already having a lot of abandonment issues coming up with the new baby. She does need me right now, and I'm tied to the pump. And because I'm tied to the pump, my husband (who works at home) is having to take charge of more infant care than his work will really allow, such as pretty much all of the feedings. These two situations can't continue much longer. I'm pumping about 20 ounces a day. I understand that pumping isn't a good metric for overall supply since the baby is more efficient than the pump, and I think that if I was nursing I might produce enough for him to get by on without supplementation, but he's eating more like 32 ounces a day. His weight gain now is good. I've tried nursing when he's hungry and when he's not and they both have the same effect: screaming. I am still using a hospital-grade pump. I am confident he's healthy now. He's not on antibiotics anymore. We got the thrush the first time because of antibiotics I had to take after his birth, and the second time because of antibiotics I had to take for the mastitis. I think the mastitis came up because of a lack of rest, stress, and...
    6 replies | 148 view(s)
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