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  • @llli*alyssa.martin.ab's Avatar
    Today, 07:34 AM
    I posted a thread a few days ago and got some wonderful answers...thank you. Now I have another issue. I do believe I have oald and have tried nursing in a reclined position. But baby is still having choking and gagging and gassy/ irritable issues. My inlaws fed him from a bottle and he LOVED it....so now im thinking about just pumping and feeding him from a bottle....but no matter which we feed him from he spits up a TON! it looks like everything he just took from me or the bottle he spits up. it looks like cottage cheese sometimes and sometimes its really runny. i just dont know if im over feeding him? also he drank about 6 oz of breast milk in 2 hours. and then he got super fussy so did he eat too much? i just feel like i dont know what im doing. i feel awful. i feel like a failure. and now im pretty sure i have post partum depression.....
    0 replies | 6 view(s)
  • @llli*chey08's Avatar
    Today, 06:17 AM
    Hi there, I have a 2 week old baby and she drinks everyb2-3 hours on one breast only for 5-7 min, can that be normal and does she get enough milk? I tried puming out my breast milk and feeding her with a bottle to monitor how much she takes in, however she seems to be more hungry when i bottle feed.. She falls asleep on my breast after 5-7 min, then take winds out to see if she wants more, but she sleeps and then only wakes up 2-3 hours later for the next feed....my concern is, is she getting enough milk and is 5-7 min suffircent enough? She has regular poo and wee nappies. Is it possible that my milk is very filling or that my milk comes out so quickly that it fills her tummy quickly?
    0 replies | 12 view(s)
  • @llli*erin.in.middletown's Avatar
    Today, 05:33 AM
    (Man, I still haven't mastered how to do 'reply with quote'-- is this just really tricky on an iPhone or am I doing it wrong?) "I agree that fussiness is normal in babies, but my baby is very calm and happy when he is not in pain. He doesn't cry and is always smiling unless he is in pain. And my concern is that I cannot help him to diminish his sufferings (thanks to very well intended doctors). The "let's wait and see how he is doing" strategy is all they can actually tell me, after years and years of medical training and practice. I can follow this strategy without going to see doctors The scary thing is that I am harming him, you are right. He was born 9.5 Apgar. I followed a very strict diet during pregnancy because of gestational diabetes and I didn't need insulin. But now, it looks like I can't do anything, because I don't know what is causing blood in his stool (the infectionist confirmed that he doesn't have any anal fissures that would bleed)." First off- I don't think that you are harming your baby. The very strict elimination diet that you are on could certainly be difficult on you, and potentially difficult to get a complete and balanced day to day, but also really stressful-- but the nutritional soundness of breastmilk has only been shown to be compromised when mom is pretty substantially malnourished. I actually would argue that the wait-and-see approach may be evidence of really sound medicine, and a really good result of years of training and study....
    17 replies | 8910 view(s)
  • @llli*erin.in.middletown's Avatar
    Today, 05:10 AM
    I was going to inquire about the schedule too-- perhaps you just mean 'this is around when baby typically likes to nurse', or no? It can be had to hear from every which corner "get your baby on a schedules pronto they need order and discipline in their lives!! Etc etc!!" but at this stage in the game, a schedule may be detrimental, and MIGHT be causing baby to eat when she's not hungry or not eat when she is? That said, spit up in and of itself is not typically something to be overly concerned with, if baby is gaining well, and appears otherwise happy and healthy. Here is my favorite spit up quite from Dr. Jack Newman: " I notice a comment about spitting up. Here's my take. If the baby is gaining weight well and is generally a happy baby spitting up is not a bad thing. In fact, it’s probably a good thing. Breastmilk is full of immune factors (not just antibodies, but dozens of others as well that all interact) that protect the baby from invasion by bacteria and other microorganisms (fungi, viruses etc) by lining your baby’s mucous membranes (the linings of the gut, respiratory tract and elsewhere). A baby who spits up has double protection, when the baby drinks the milk and it goes to the stomach and then when he spits it up. I frequently use this example of how breastfeeding is so different from formula and bottle feeding. Spitting up formula, if all else is going well, is probably not bad. Spitting up breastmilk, if all else is going well, is probably good."...
    3 replies | 97 view(s)
  • @llli*erin.in.middletown's Avatar
    Today, 04:54 AM
    The AAP rec's for standard protocol to check iron levels at 12 months, but their rec's also state that it is totally okay (ha! Not a direct quote!) to check earlier if there are any risk factors or concerns. I had been researching solid food introduction, etc etc, and from that, was feeling that iron is really not anything to mess around with, so asked that my baby be tested at her six month visit. It was a toe prick test, and the results are available right away. I will likely have another test done at 9 months, because she was on the low end of the normal range, and is really not enthused about solids yet. So if you are able to have your baby tested, it doesn't seem like it would hurt anything (except for baby's toe, for a brief time)-- if baby is good, you can rest assured that's not the issue. If they're low, you can either focus on iron rich foods and correct through diet (ideal, if baby will eat those foods), or do drops. But there is no need, and actual downsides, of doing iron drops if baby isn't low, because there are negative effects if the body has too much iron. http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/early/2010/10/05/peds.2010-2576.full.pdf
    6 replies | 152 view(s)
  • @llli*bsua65's Avatar
    Today, 04:24 AM
    She also seems to be sleeping a long stretch without eating! But maybe that's because mine still doesn't so I can't imagine it!
    3 replies | 97 view(s)
  • @llli*bsua65's Avatar
    Today, 04:21 AM
    Is there a reason you are feeding to a schedule rather then demand feed? How much does she take in a bottle? Are bottles given in a paced manner? I wonder if she is over eating maybe? If she is happy and gaining well I wouldn't worry about spit up too much.
    3 replies | 97 view(s)
  • @llli*bsua65's Avatar
    Today, 04:14 AM
    Just a thought but if baby is taking solids well maybe these are replacing his need for milk? There's no comfort/bonding from a bottle so in theory if he needs less it makes sense for him to drop the bottle and stick to the breast. It's just a random idea tho, not one born out if experience... Some Mum's do see babies drop a feed around this age if baby eats well, some Mums don't too, so its all a variable!
    3 replies | 90 view(s)
  • @llli*bsua65's Avatar
    Today, 03:43 AM
    I just want to say breastmilk is transparent and blue-ish with only a thin white layer on top, that's normal! ;)
    17 replies | 8910 view(s)
  • @llli*danikap's Avatar
    Today, 03:40 AM
    Thank you so much for your helpful advice and information. My baby girl actually is gaining over double the average weight. Bit block feeding makes me nervous anyhow! Position changes like laid back haven't seemseemed to prevent the choking but maybe some of those other positions will do the trick! I love the chocolate milk shake idea for my toddler thank you for sharing!
    2 replies | 97 view(s)
  • @llli*seattlemama's Avatar
    Today, 03:39 AM
    He's getting Vit D drops everyday since his 4mo appointment. Iron hasn't been tested, at what age they test it? The reason I'm concerned is, I fear that he might be weaning and I'm not ready for it. I so badly want to nurse for at least until he is a year and a half if not more. I'd love to hear from Moms that were/are nursing for that long, how their babies nursed around 7-8-9mo? Pls share your experiences.
    6 replies | 152 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:21 PM
    From Breastfeeding Answers Made Simple, lactation textbook, Nancy Mohrbacher, 2010. On bloody stool: "If a baby has bloody stools and eliminating dairy from the mother's diet does not resolve them, they will most likely clear in time with continued breastfeeding." p. 520 (Italics mine) After description of a study of both breast and formula fed infants with bloody stool the results of which are too complicated to explain here: "If the baby's healthcare provider recommends suspending breastfeeding during a trial of hypoallergenic formula, suggest the mother discuss the possibility of continuing to breastfeed, as NO NEGATIVE OUTCOMES HAVE BEEN ASSOCIATED WITH THIS. P 521 (caps mine) Pm me if you would like to arrange to talk to me and I will read you the pages on the study.
    17 replies | 8910 view(s)
  • @llli*tomzgirl's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:04 PM
    You gals are all awesome! Thank you for taking the time to share such valuable info with a newbie.
    8 replies | 93 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:57 PM
    No. Not for regular mastitis. If is also perfectly safe to keep nursing baby- did Dr. tell you to stop that as well? I am not sure what the concern about the pumped milk is??? I am not 100% sure about the pumped milk if it is MRSA which is a little trickier but I assume you would have mentioned if it is that. Are you getting antibiotics? how are you feeling? Here is more info about mastitis. http://www.llli.org/docs/0000000000000001WAB/WAB_Tear_sheet_Toolkit/18_mastitiswhatcanyoudo.pdf and plugs: http://www.llli.org/docs/0000000000000001WAB/WAB_Tear_sheet_Toolkit/17_dealingwithplugsblebs.pdf
    1 replies | 70 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:55 PM
    I would also suggest research lactation aids (Medela SNS, LactAid, or homemade.) Many adoptive moms are indeed able to produce milk, but whether they will ever make enough to feed baby entirely or to do so right away is a different story. Some do, some do not. A lactation aid allows baby to be supplemented as needed at the breast, so baby and mom continue to get the wonderful benefits of nursing at the breast while mom works on her production or even if she does not make quite enough. Plus baby nursing at the breast even with a supplementer is better for milk production. I strongly suggest that, within reason, don't let cost defer you from getting what is going to increase your likelihood of being able to breastfeed. If the cost of buying a new pump or renting a pump feels prohibitive, think about this...babies are expensive, but we tend to spend money on the wrong things. Almost everything on the typical new baby list from clothing to changing table to strollers can almost certainly be acquired for free as hand me downs or gifts, or for very cheap second hand. But in most cases, no one is going to get you what you really need to breastfeed- A new pump that is in impeccable working order (or a rented hospital grade pump) and a lactation aid, and perhaps a consultation or two with a good lactation consultant. So spend your money there is my suggestion.
    8 replies | 93 view(s)
  • @llli*vf's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:40 PM
    Thank you for your reply. So, after trying to decrease my "oversupply" I ended up with a very painful plugged duct that lasted for about a week and the breast is still tender and slightly harder over that duct. I also introduced avocado in my diet and my milk seems to be less transparent and bluish. So, no more "block feedings". I also saw the infectionist today and she recommended that we follow-up with her in 3 weeks and if there is no improvement than she would recommend to switch my baby to hypoallergenic formula... This is what I really do not intend to do... So, the only solution is to keep following the diet. I am now eating the following: oatmeal, pears, apples, avocado, buckwheat, turkey fillet and potatoes. Tried some pork and onion, but not sure if will continue. Grapes and sunflower seeds resulted in more blood in the stool. The stool looks quite normal for the past 3 days (mustardy but liquid) with small blood dots here and there. When I told the infectionist what I am eating she looked very puzzled and said she was expecting to hear that I am actually eating dairy or soy or wheat or fish and she would tell me to remove them from my diet. She said she didn't expect me to be on such a strict diet and baby still having blood in his stool. Actually, she was surprised to hear that blood appeared in his stool only one week after I started the diet. The reason for going onto the diet was the gooey, mucousy and greenish stools that my baby was having. The...
    17 replies | 8910 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:26 PM
    Ugh, it is very frustrating to be in between sizes: A couple things to think about - You can switch flanges as needed, and/or use a different flange size for each breast if needed. I am wondering it possibly you find that when you are fuller you need the larger and can use the smaller more comfortably when less full? If the smaller flange hurts but is otherwise giving you a better seal and better milk extraction, try lubing it up with olive oil to avoid injury. Play around with pump settings. I also used a symphony for a short time and found some of the settings really were too intense for me. Have you looked into alternative flanges from pumpin pals? http://www.pumpinpal.com/
    7 replies | 144 view(s)
  • @llli*noodles610's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:05 PM
    I usually transfer them to Avent bottles prior to putting them in the fridge to avoid that issue. That way, if I need a quick feed and didn't pump, I just need to heat it up even at home. Is that bad?
    6 replies | 166 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:57 PM
    Absolutely. In my experience it was very simple and kind of relaxing in a weird way-, made simpler by the fact I was not worried about saving the milk.
    4 replies | 141 view(s)
  • @llli*erin.in.middletown's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:52 PM
    I hear you on the more sleep sounding nice! My babe's sleep is really all over the map, with so much teething, crawling around, head bumping, distractions, etc during the day. The only piece that I've found that I can control that SOMETIMES gets me a little but longer of a sleep stretch at the beginning of the night is to do a dream feed. And to nap when babe does during the day if it's been a rocky night!
    5 replies | 114 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:48 PM
    Yes I agree suggest dad try pacifier or some other comfort measure if baby is not settling after a normal sized feeding. Nursing is as much about comfort as it is about the milk, but bottles are entirely about milk. When a breastfed baby is fussy and mom is there, it never hurts to offer to nurse and ask questions later...if baby is NOT settled by nursing, then other things can be tried. it is a bit different when mom is not there, as A baby may well try to comfort suck with a bottle and this results in overfeeding. So if baby is getting plenty of milk, other comfort measures will help avoid overfeeding. I will have to add this to my list of weird stuff breastfeeding is blamed for! Seriously I also think there is probably no reason to worry about one 6 ounce bottle or one day of baby eating more via bottle- it happens and may well be fine. I don't want to tease dad, I am sure he is doing a great job. It is hard to take care of a baby without the secret comforting weapon of nursing. some fussy baby ideas for dad to try? : http://www.llli.org/docs/0000000000000001WAB/WAB_Tear_sheet_Toolkit/09_fussybabyideas.pdf and http://www.llli.org/docs/0000000000000001WAB/WAB_Tear_sheet_Toolkit/10_what_about_partners.pdf My husband has his own sling in a gentlemanly gray shade and settled all our kids beautifully just walking around the house doing his thing with them in the sling.
    13 replies | 218 view(s)
  • @llli*erin.in.middletown's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:33 PM
    The Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine has a podcast, searchable in the iTunes app (and presumably probably just on their website too!) that has an episode on adoptive breastfeeding (and many other interesting topics that may be of interest!).
    8 replies | 93 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:23 PM
    If weight gain is normal, I think you work with the assumption that he's getting enough even if the feeds are short and few... Just keep offering and plugging along! Hopefully his interest will pick up with time. Is he getting a multivitamin, or has his iron been tested? Low iron can sometimes cause low appetite- or at least so I have read.
    6 replies | 152 view(s)
  • @llli*erin.in.middletown's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:21 PM
    After investigating the lipase issue potential, and so long as baby is offered water (really no benefits for juice)... I would feel like this just might be a really handy opportunity to ditch bottles altogether while you're at it. It's typically rec'd to do so at/before 12 months, right?, for their impacts on palate and tooth development, etc?. Nutritionally, breastmilk is still really important for the rest of the first year (and onward, of course), but he is getting it straight from nursing when you're home, you can continue to offer and continue to use it in baking/food prep, and I feel like you've got those bases covered. And so long as he is nursing when with you, and pumping when away, your breastfeeding relationship will still be going strong, no? Edited to add-- I guess all I'm really trying to say is that other than their ease of delivery, they're isn't really anything beneficial about bottles, so perhaps this can be seen in a positive light- that weaning off the bottles is happening 'naturally' (just talking about the delivery-method, not the content.)
    3 replies | 90 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:21 PM
    Lucky moms know better, right? Pretty typical for non-mom caregivers to think that the baby needs "something else". But moms know that pretty much all needs can be filled at the breast, and they always know their babies' hunger cues better than the non-nursing parent. And even if a baby does want "something else", it doesn't hurt to offer the breast. Yes. The bottle delivers a fast, constant flow of milk, as opposed the ebb and flow rhythm of the breast. And while flow from the breast will slow or stop when the baby transitions from active, nutritive sucking to gentle, erratic comfort sucking, the flow from the bottle will remain constant regardless of what sort of sucking the baby is doing. Can dad swap in a paci when the baby has had around 4 oz? That might cut down on overeating from the bottle.
    13 replies | 218 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:14 PM
    Stronger suction isn't necessarily the road to higher production. Some moms actually respond better to lower suction. But a used pump is likely to have less power and that usually means less suction and less stimulation. One important thing to remember about pumping is that frequency is almost always the most important element of milk production for an exclusively pumping mom. If you're looking for something to max out, go for frequency. Suction and duration of pumping matter less.
    8 replies | 93 view(s)
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