Happy Mothers Breastfed Babies

Activity Stream

Filter
Sort By Time Show
Recent Recent Popular Popular Anytime Anytime Last 7 Days Last 7 Days Last 30 Days Last 30 Days All All Photos Photos Forum Forums
  • @llli*dormir41's Avatar
    Today, 08:42 AM
    Oh okay. Good to know. The scale is only accurate to a half oz, and I know some feedings are more. Today she got 2 1/2 oz in on her second feeding after she got up. I've been reluctant to weigh her at every feeding because I don't want her waiting to eat too long, but I could start weighing her more for a couple of days. During the day, she is fed about 10 or 12 times. Sometimes more . . . When she seems hungry, I feed her. We cosleep so I couldn't tell you with any certainty about nighttime feeds, but probably at least two on the low end, likely more. She can sleep four to five hour stretches at night. Question about length/amount of feedings. She will unlatch at times, wait five mins, then relatch, and I go with it. Sometimes this happens several times in an hour. I count that usually as one feeding. Is that appropriate? Her skin tends to be dry but not too bad, and she only had one instance of reflux at about two weeks. She spits up, but maybe once or twice a week. I have eliminated soy without trying (I rarely have it) and dairy relatively easily. I have lactose intolerance so really was only eating cheese or yogurt, as I can't stand to drink milk, butter makes me ill, and I don't like most other dairy products. As a baby I was allergic to milk as apparently I would projectile vomit if my mother had any dairy. She doesn't do that, and I've had occasional cheese by mistake, so I haven't elimanated it entirely.
    5 replies | 85 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 08:22 AM
    :ita with MaddieB! If you can answer her questions, we'll be in a better position to offer advice. :)
    2 replies | 62 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 08:20 AM
    This all sounds perfectly normal. Babies don't nurse for 20 minutes per side forever. Most of them become more adept nursers and eventually learn how to get their needs met in a much shorter amount of time- under 10 minutes is typical. The fact that your baby refuses the breast when you offer again suggests that he is getting plenty of food in a shorter amount of time. Babies who aren't getting enough to eat typically do not refuse the breast. This situation would be highly unusual in a healthy baby who was born at term. Burning too many calories while nursing is a problem for babies who are sick or significantly premature. When díaper output is fine, there's no need to worry about baby's milk intake even when feedings are very fast. Good output = good input!
    12 replies | 196 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 08:09 AM
    Lip and tongue ties can be released at any time. In fact, my older kid's lip tie was discovered by the dentist when she was 8 and her incisors were coming in with a gap between them, and he nonchalantly recommended waiting to see if the tie continued to be a problem and releasing it if it was. I know someone who had her tongue and lip ties released in childhood and she said it was very traumatic- she ended up with infections and it was "pretty awful". But I don't know if that is a typical experience! If you are considering having your child's tie(s) released, I think it makes sense to have a long discussion about infection control and potential complications. It seems to me that if you have already had your baby's ties released, it makes sense to be conservative about having them released again. If your baby is able to nurse well enough that she's in the 75th %ile for weight, it's very unlikely that ties will cause her problems with feeding. Most babies get better at nursing as they get older, irrespective of the presence of ties. Furthermore, the issues you are seeing could be due to the ties but at 4.5 months could also be caused by distractibility, teething, weird baby quirks... Soreness concerns me but it could also be chalked up to causes other than ties- for example, getting your period back, baby soothing her sore gums on your nipple, a new pregnancy (???).
    1 replies | 0 view(s)
  • @llli*rubyluv's Avatar
    Today, 07:57 AM
    My baby is 4.5 months old. At 3 weeks age she had her frenulum and lip tie released . At that point she was having a hard time with the flow, very gassy, fussing at the breast, and her top lip didn't curl out. A month after the procedure I noticed that they both seemed to grow back. However, she was gaining weight and I was a bit traumatized by the procedure and didn't want to take her back for second time. I'm finding that this week my nipples are sore. She seems to have a hard time 'keeping suction' while latched and often it sounds like she is swallowing air/gulping while nursing. Now that she is older she is also moving her head around quite a bit more, and that doesn't help with losing suction. Her top lip still doesn't curl out. Ive also posted earlier about my concerns with supply, and I'm wondering if this is a factor? At her 4 month check-up her weight was good, 75th percentile. I'm contemplating whether its worth having the tongue/lip tie release done again. My concern is that breastfeeding will become increasingly more difficult as she grows if this issue is of significance.
    1 replies | 0 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 07:56 AM
    :ita with MaddieB, as usual. I just want to throw something out there, for your consideration. Take it as a thought experiment, not a criticism! My thinking about solids is that while there is absolutely no need to push solids on a baby who is less than a year old, and who can be completely nourished by breastmilk or formula alone, there's also no reason to delay solids. My pediatrician once told me that until a baby is around a year old, solids are for fun with new tastes, textures, and motor skills. They aren't necessary for nutrition. But just because they aren't necessary for nutrition, does that mean a baby should be denied the opportunity to experiment with them and learn from them? Since you're clearly someone who likes to read up on things before making a decision, you might want to read up on Baby-led Solids (a.k.a. Baby-led Weaning, where weaning takes the British sense of introducing solids rather than the cessation of breastfeeding) and see if that approach might allow you to combine the fun, learning aspects of solids while also reducing/eliminating concerns about baby eating too much solid food or replacing breastmilk with solids.
    4 replies | 118 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 07:42 AM
    First thing to ask yourself is this: do YOU want to go? Because if you do, traveling and breastfeeding are compatible, especially if you take the baby with you and nurse rather than pumping. You find yourself a bridesmaid dress that is nursing-compatible or that can be altered to be nursing-compatible. If baby is not welcome at the ceremony, you find yourself a babysitter and you give the sitter some bottles, or you slip out from time to time to nurse, when the sitter pings you via cell phone. This means that you won't have the most worry-free, drink-and-dance-till-you-drop time at your friend's wedding, but it's totally doable! If you DON'T want to go, now is the time to back out. Tell your friend that you are going to have a 3 month-old baby and you just don't see how you can be a good mom and be the bridesmaid your friend deserves. She has plenty of time to find a backup bridesmaid, and if she is a true friend, she will understand that wanting to do something and being able to do something are not the same.
    1 replies | 15 view(s)
  • @llli*dormir41's Avatar
    Today, 07:41 AM
    I have a ten week old, she will be twelve weeks a day after I go back to work on April 6th. I've been almost exclusively breastfeeding, with some supplementation of formula (at most three oz daily). She is 8 lbs at last weigh in at drs office (last Friday). She's gotten bottles of both breastmilk and formula given by my husband and we have a syringe in case she won't take the bottle (she often won't take the formula from me). I have been pumping about once a day since my milk came in and have some in the freezer. I'm planning on starting to pump more a few days before I go back to work to have some in the fridge for my husband. I'm interested in getting a better idea of how to handle this and am not sure how much I should shoot for. My husband wants to save the freezer stash for later but I think we should use a little just bc I think it will be hard to pump enough and nurse at the same time while I'm home. I know she'll need at least twelve oz or so, possibly double or triple that. I have an eight hour workday, but commute so will be gone around ten hours. Thoughts? I'm also dreading the first day of our new morning routine . . .getting up with so little sleep and transferring her to her bed since we've been cosleeping and its working well but she can't be in bed with my husband asleep. She's too young and he has sleep apnea anyway. How have others handled this?
    0 replies | 5 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 07:24 AM
    Is this a digital baby scale accurate to the 1/10 of an oz? And if so, would you be willing/able to weigh her every time she nurses for a couple of days? The reason I ask is that 0.5-1.5 oz at a feeding is a bit low for a 10 week old baby, and I think it would be worthwhile to find out if there are some larger feedings happening. In other words, are you picking up the middle of the range, or just the bottom? Breastfed babies need around 19-30 oz of milk per day, with around 25 oz/day being the average (reference: http://kellymom.com/bf/pumpingmoms/pumping/milkcalc/). If your baby is taking 1.5 oz every time she nurses, that means she needs to nurse around 17 times per day in order to get that 25 oz total. Is she nursing that often? Mucousy poop has more potential causes than just allergy. For this to be an allergy, I'd want to see more symptoms, like eczema, blood poop, reflux... Not saying that you shouldn't eliminate dairy and soy, but I do think it's weird that you can supplement with a conventional formula and not have that cause problems, while you cannot have a glass of milk or a piece of tofu!
    5 replies | 85 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 07:15 AM
    :ita with the excellent information and suggestions from MaddieB! It sounds like you have 2 concerns: 1. Lower pump output following an episode of bad plugs 2. Low supply Is there anything else that we should be addressing? IMO, the best way to address both of these concerns is to nurse more. As MaddieB said, nursing just 5x in 24 hours is remarkably low for such a young baby. Most exclusively breastfed babies nurse a minimum of 8x per day, and many nurse far more often than that. Nursing more often is going to be good for supply, because milk is produced on a supply = demand basis. More nursing means more demand which creates more supply. A lot of moms go by the assumption that nursing on demand means nursing only when baby gives unmistakable signs of wanting to nurse. Demand nursing can also mean nursing when mom wants- that is, put the baby to the breast whenever you feel a little full, when it would be convenient for you to nurse, when you'd like to put your feet up for a bit, before a nap, in the middle of the night when you feel full, when you might otherwise reach for the pump, etc.
    2 replies | 62 view(s)
  • @llli*dormir41's Avatar
    Today, 07:09 AM
    She pooped three times yesterday and twice already today. Go figure. I guess she's back to her previous routine, at least for today.
    5 replies | 85 view(s)
  • @llli*dormir41's Avatar
    Today, 07:07 AM
    The housekeeping was worth every penny and then some. Only problem is they cleaned so well that now we can't find some items (they even moved furniture to clean under it!), but it's a small price to pay. :) The only way I've found to shower is put her in her bouncy chair in the bathroom with me or have someone watch her while I shower. She usually stays calm in the chair even without someone to bounce her. I think the steam helps her stuffy nose, and she knows I'm around. She doesn't fall asleep but she doesn't fuss either unless I take too long getting dressed. Showers are difficult!
    9 replies | 250 view(s)
  • @llli*leemami's Avatar
    Today, 06:32 AM
    Hello ladies I'm 32 weeks pregnant, and I have an 2.5 yo toddler too. Last year, before I got pregnant, my best friend picked me as her maid of honor. I was soooo excited, I helped her as much as I could from here. She lives in Washington state, where the wedding is going to be, and I live in Mississippi. The shortest trip is a 2 plane ride, about 7-8 hours total. Eeesh... Anyway, after I got pregnant, I told her and she was like !?!?!?! Please tell me you're still coming!!, and since the baby is due in May and the wedding is in August, I was like yeah, I can still go! Well, now we are getting into ordering bridesmaids dresses, etc, etc, and I was talking to my hubby yesterday about it, and I think he had forgotten about it. He didn't want to go in the first place anyway, he's not very fond of traveling by plane. So the first thing he told me was: tell her you won't go, how are you going to do with the breastfeedi ng thing? That was it. I freaked out.
    1 replies | 15 view(s)
  • @llli*dormir41's Avatar
    Today, 06:31 AM
    When my baby fusses at the breast, it tends to: be near the end of a feeding (if at beginning, she's extremely hungry or she's tired) and I've learned to try a few things: 1. Burp her 2. Change her 3. Walk around with her 4. Switch breasts or 5. hand her to my husband if he's available so he can calm her. Sometimes she's just tired or gassy and that does the trick. If she's pooped, she hates a dirty diaper unless she's very tired or hungry. Plus, it gives both of us a break as I get upset right along with her if she fusses too much, which makes it worse. If I reoffer the breast and she falls asleep, it seems she's fussing bc she's tired. People tell me not to let her fall asleep at the breast, but she seems to do better if I let her sleep, even a few minutes, then try again when she wakes up. Babies are individuals and we have to treat them that way. Or that's how it seems to me in my very limited experience.
    12 replies | 196 view(s)
  • @llli*bsua65's Avatar
    Today, 04:42 AM
    Babies are designed to suckle and so it is rare/unlikely that they are going to expend more energy than they are gaining from the milk. In my experience when a paediatrician said this to me what was actually going on was inefficient milk transfer due to latch issues and the paed basically had no idea about breastfeeding! I would allow baby to feed as much or as little as they want and if they are pulling off and fussing try to alleviate fussiness in other ways (bouncing, singing babywearing etc) That all said was breastfeeding assessed when you had weight gain issues to see if baby had any physical issues/latch issues affecting milk transfer? And it's probably been said but are bottles being given in a paced manner and/or have you considered other ways of supplementing? ( e.g. cup, syringe, ginger, SNS/lact aid)
    12 replies | 196 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 01:45 AM
    Awww what a great picture to come home to. Yes parenting really is a roller coaster and it is just beginning. Enjoy the ride!
    9 replies | 250 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 01:41 AM
    It is one thing to have naysayers who are friends or extended family with no direct responsibility for your child. Basically, if you are confident in your choices, as you apparently are, who cares if you get "distain" from them? How you raise your child is none of their business. There are many ways to handle criticism from those outside your immediate family, there are several good articles on here about that, but I assume you have already seen many suggestions in the books you have read. Another idea is to find some other like minded parents near you. It is very empowering to hang out with mammas who are approaching parenting similarly to the way you are. You may not find people who agree with you on everything, but I imagine it would not be too difficult to find a local group near you that you would feel comfortable with and supported by. But when the person who is concerned is the person you are raising your child with, the child's other parent, I do think that is a different situation. I assume you have shared what you have learned with him and for whatever reason these ideas are not resonating with him the way they are for you. Ok, maybe over time the proof will be in the pudding. But I guess I think that if one bone of contention is when, precisely, to start offering solids to a healthy child, a few weeks one way or another when the child is almost a year old is a logical place for compromise. I am willing to bet there are no two parents who agree on every...
    4 replies | 118 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 01:11 AM
    Hi and welcome. Weaning off formula supplements can be a frustrating process but it often can be done. I have several questions you can answer if you like: How many times a 24 hour day does your baby nurse? How many bottles are given each day, in what amount each time, and when, and how do you decide baby needs a supplement? Is paced bottle feeding method used for all bottles? Have you ever tried or considered an alternative to bottles for supplementing? How many times a day do you pump, and when you pump, how much do you get each time (about?) What kind of pump is it and when did you start pumping- recently, or have you pumped from the start? Do you also supplement your baby with what you pump and if so, how much more supplement in bottles is that than the 4-8 ounces of formula?
    2 replies | 62 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 12:55 AM
    Wow I am so sorry you are having such a hard time! I hope I can assure you that there is no reason to think you can no longer nurse your child. Even if you do not make "enough" right now- or even if you never do again make 'enough." Many mothers for whatever reason find they do not make enough milk and have to supplement with donated breastmilk, formula, and/or solids. This does not have to mean the end of breastfeeding. Also, it is possible the stress of your injury plus the supplements and the reoccurring days of no nursing have harmed your production- in other words, your milk production may only be temporarily not 'enough." Milk production is not static. If you have 'lost' production, it can usually be increased again. I also wonder if the stress of the entire situation is causing the fussiness at the breast. It is also possible that your child is experiencing some 'nipple confusion' or 'flow confusion' due to the necessity of being bottle fed. I want to understand something about the weight loss and gain. If your child was at 10 percentile at 2 months, is there some reason baby needs to be at 50 percentile now? Fluctuations in percentile are normal, and there is no reason a baby 'should" go up in percentile as baby ages. If a baby does go 'up' it is not uncommon for baby to go down again, especially after 6 months when weight gain rate slows. If this age is exactly also when the accident and the weight loss happened, maybe that is in part why baby...
    1 replies | 46 view(s)
  • @llli*momofcww's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:49 PM
    Hi everyone, this is my first post. I am discouraged and need some help. I am an experienced breastfeeding mom and am currently nursing my 8+ month son. I am currently a SAHM and haven't pumped much. Eight weeks ago, I was in a car accident and badly injured my non-dominant hand. I was in the hospital for three days, and that was the first time my then-seven-month-old son had formula. I have NO use of my hand (it is expected to heal completely, but it is taking a very long time), so I cannot be alone with my son. I am on pain medication, which is compatible with breastfeeding, although the pain is pretty manageable now. He spends one day a week away from me and runs all errands with my husband. I have medical appointments 3-4 times per week. Otherwise, we are together. Before the accident we were bed sharing at night. That has continued somewhat, but nighttime sleep is mediocre at best for all of us right now. I cannot pick up, bathe, or diaper my son, so our only sustained physical contact is through nursing. To complicate things, I am three days into antibiotic treatment for mastitis. My body is just incredibly run down. The emotional aspect of nursing is very important to both of us.
    1 replies | 46 view(s)
  • @llli*jswan14's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:58 PM
    Here is an update on my situation. I would appreciate any feedback! So today hasn't been great in terms of nursing- my little guy has been super fussy at the breast all day. He normally nurses for 20 minutes each side. Every feeding today he has nursed for 5-8 minutes where I can hear him swallowing. Then he either falls asleep or starts batting my breast whil grunting and squirming as if nothing is coming off. I try to get him to relatch, but usually to no avail. Basically he seems super hungry and can't wait to get back to eating. Sometimes I take a break to burp him. He often whines for a minute, but then is fine. If he needed more to eat, he wouldn't be calm after I've pulled him off, right? We had some difficulty putting weight on him intially, and the ped attributed it partially to long nursing sessions where he was just sucking but not taking in milk and burning too many calories. I don't want that to happen again so I am hesitant to keep feeding. Could his sleeping be because he has expended too much energy? To link this back to my last post, I haven't started my period and when I have pumped, there is still milk coming out so There is something left he just isn't getting it. Diaper output has been fine, but I also supplemented with some bottles this morning. Sorry this is so rambling, but I'm nervous!
    12 replies | 196 view(s)
  • @llli*francismum's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:30 PM
    Thanks Maddieb for your reply. The disagreement is about both. As far as compromising on offering solids, I have not offered them due to my personal feelings that it is best for him to be EBF to a year before introducing. I have done the research and feel confident that it is what his body needs, esp considering the very small amounts that are taken in anyways. I don't worry about him knowing how to eat, he is very smart and picks up on things extremely fast. I am certainly not worried about the mess! :lol I love seeing him explore and his favorite thing right now is digging in the mud ;) I know bm is the superior food and he is doing very well. I just struggle with the lack of support as well as criticism. I am human after all ;) I am aware of baby led solids and plan on doing just that after the 12 mo mark. Have you read any on Mayim Bialik? She is one of a few that I know that also waited until 12 mo to introduce solids....I have read some great reads on Attachment Parenting. One of which is titled Attached by Robert Karen as well as works by the legendary John Bowlby and also am reading Nisa, a story about a Kung woman. I am shocked about how much is portrayed about breastfeeding in the media and by doctors or peds. It is saddening to me that it is so hard to find the support you need and info that you are looking for on such an important part of a baby's life. Thanks for the book suggestions! I will pick them up, I love to read ;) Also, have to mention...
    4 replies | 118 view(s)
  • @llli*luvmy.munchkins's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:02 PM
    I never thought about being sneaky. Prolly wouldn't work for me either. Hahaha. There is always hope.
    13 replies | 334 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwarrior's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:00 PM
    I just saw your post. How are you doing? Still having trouble with plugged ducts? I have been struggling with constant plugged ducts for the past 2 weeks. I am also on a total elimination diet (little man is allergic to milk and corn so far!). I know of one other mom who was on an elimination diet and began having a lot of issues with clogged ducts. Could it be a side effect of our diet??? I'm really struggling with my resolve to continue breastfeeding. This is my third child and the first time I have ever considered using formula!
    8 replies | 332 view(s)
  • @llli*roya2015's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:52 PM
    My daughter is 11 weeks old and I've been mixed feeding from the beginning. She started crying really bad the second day of birth and the nurses could only calm her with formula. I think that lead to my low supply. I've been pumping and taking herbal supplements to increase my supple and I could increase it but now baby is taking anywhere between 4 oz to 8 oz a day. I would love to wean her off the formula if possible but if not I don't want to give her more than this. Her weight gain at her 2 months checkup was great (77 percentile). Any advice would be appreciated.
    2 replies | 62 view(s)
  • @llli*roya2015's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:48 PM
    I have almost the same situation. My daughter is 11 weeks old and I've been mixed feeding from the beginning. She started crying really bad the second day of birth and the nurses could only calm her with formula. I think that lead to my low supply. I've been pumping and taking herbal supplements to increase my supple and I could increase it but now baby is taking anywhere between 4 oz to 8 oz a day. I would love to wean her off the formula if possible but if not I don't want to give her more than this. Her weight gain at her 2 months checkup was great (77 percentile). Any advice would be appreciated.
    12 replies | 548 view(s)
  • @llli*littlecavemomma's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:49 PM
    Yay! That's great news! I think we can all look back at that 3rd and 4th day after coming home from the hospital and remember how confusing, emotional, exhausting, TERRIFYING it was. Like the others said, it's a roller coaster when you're figuring it all out, but once you've got it it's such a beautiful thing. Good on you for being so supportive!
    9 replies | 250 view(s)
  • @llli*harrisds's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:34 PM
    Thank you everyone for the input. This week has been a roller coaster but even though my wife's milk was very white by Tuesday it came in yesterday fully, like opening the Hoover dam. She said it is now flowing very well. I was able to come home this weekend and walked in the door and she was sitting on the floor breast feeding just fine. The week was very stressful for my wife but things are much better now. Again thank you for the help.
    9 replies | 250 view(s)
  • @llli*fes's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:32 PM
    Ahh, I hadn't even thought of the fact that baby is nursing more thoroughly at times when compared to other times. That explains a lot then. I don't know why I was thinking the amount left over from a nursing session would be a constant! Thanks for pointing that out! once I return to work and am pumping in place of nursing and if I find that my storage capacity is small (ie only getting 2 oz), should I try to pump more often at work? I will probably have to in order to maintain demand. I hadn't thought about the fact that a low suction can also pump the milk efficiently. I have to say that it is less tender the more often I have pumped. Maybe it was just getting used to it like you said. I might just see a IBCLC anyway, just to make sure I'm doing it all correctly Thanks for your help!!
    4 replies | 132 view(s)
More Activity