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  • @llli*nivilovely's Avatar
    Today, 02:23 PM
    So this is what happened today. I nursed him at 6:30 one breast and pumped other 1 3/4 oz. baby woke up at 9;30 AM = 1 3/4oz. I pumped milk 3 3/4 oz baby 11 Am= 1.5 oz Nursed baby(Not so hungry) at 12:45 pm One breast and pumped other 1oz. baby woke up at 3:00 pm =1.5oz. 4:00 pm 1 3/4oz Pumped at 3:30 Pm 3.5 Oz So total baby took little more or less than 6.5oz. and I pumped 10 1/4 oz. I feel he is taking less milk. I didn't pump myself to 2nd let down. He nursed yesterday night like 12:30,3:30 So is that why he is taking less milk?
    6 replies | 113 view(s)
  • @llli*moredonuts's Avatar
    Today, 12:22 PM
    My toddler is now 2 years old and I am struggling with maintaining breastfeeding while working. I continue to pump at work, but get less and less. I can pump 4x a day for 20 minutes and still only get 8oz. Outside of work he nurses whenever he feels like it (including night). The timing/frequency is variable - it depends on his mood. I'd like to not pump so much but I worry that if I stop pumping that my supply at other times of day. At school he often doesn't finish the milk I send I think he would be fine if I stopped sending entirely but I think he would mind if there was less milk when nursing. He does get frustrated at times when my letdown is slow so I know that he is looking for both milk and comfort when he nurses. How does one successfully maintain toddler nursing without spending all day with the pump?
    0 replies | 12 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:13 PM
    Hi again. Interesting you are reporting early fast letdown/overproduction. If I recall the other threads on this correctly, this seems to be a reoccurring theme when there is this type of breast refusal (which I have just decided I am going to unofficially name "awake refusal.") I also know that some LCs have mused that there is way more OP than there used to be, probably due to the pressure on mothers to pump whether it is needed or not, or to pump more than is needed when it IS needed. So could the possible increase in OP that some LCs suspect also be leading to an increase in "awake refusal"? just something to think about. If OP/fast letdown was a contributor to the problem, I assume that is no longer occurring as it would be unusual past the first few months for mom to continue to overproduce. If it is still happening, there are a few different methods for slowing flow or helping baby handle fast flow. Let me know if you need info on that. If baby dislikes feeding laying down- and this would be common, actually- there are many nursing positions to try where baby is sitting up, maybe leaning on mom while mom leans back slightly so baby is tilted up, etc. I had OP and I practically had to have one baby in a completely upright position to nurse when the flow was fast. He was really big and I sat on the couch and let his legs hang down between my legs and held him upright to nurse. Later he straddled one of my legs. There are so many positions to try and the older...
    3 replies | 104 view(s)
  • @llli*draaagonfly's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:29 PM
    This has been really helpful, thank you. So much of what you said makes sense with my experience. Firstly the NICU was very focused on weight gain and they kept insisting on formula top ups after nursing, especially in the first couple of days before my milk came in. The pediatrician even wanted to tube feed my (TERM!!) baby because their respiration rate was high. Thankfully the nurses didn't take that recommendation. Continuing after leaving the NICU I was still getting external pressure about weight gain from the midwifery collective. I really agree with you that there are problematic expectations out there in this regard. Then I ended up with oversupply (most likely due to pumping so much for fear of losing my supply because of the formula!), which I had suspected was part of the original problem too. It took a while to figure out what was wrong because I never had blocked ducts or mastitis. It was eventually diagnosed by my midwife. But babe had many instances of choking and spluttering at the breast in those first two months or so. As well, they've pretty much always had an aversion to being held in a lying down position. I am nearly certain this is not due to reflux. They have always slept fine on their back and were happy to lie on the floor on their back (and tummy) to play. I have always gotten the impression that it's just about wanting to look around and have the best view, and to stay awake. Baby has been gaining steadily since 8-10 weeks old and I...
    3 replies | 104 view(s)
  • @llli*nivilovely's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:08 PM
    I know first week is really tough. I am little anxious and worried about my son.
    6 replies | 113 view(s)
  • @llli*nivilovely's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:08 PM
    Hello Djs thanks for the reply. I don't have much big of a freezer stash. may be 10oz and 4 oz in fridge. I didn't stash more because I know I can send the milk I pump in the morning by noon with my husband at least even if I don't go home. because we work for same company. I told my mom not to go beyond 4 oz per session and start with 2oz and increment if he ask for more. I am confused as of now. and will see how it goes tomorrow. Not sure if I would be able to sync his feeding time with my lunch time.
    6 replies | 113 view(s)
  • @llli*djs.mom's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:13 PM
    The whole point of pumping while away is to maintain your supply AND replace the feeds that you would miss while working. The rule of thumb is 1-1.5 oz for every hour you are away from the baby. With the hope that you will be able to leave all the baby will drink while away from you the next day. So if you are able to pump that without emptying you breasts the great! Do you have your freezer stash for tomorrow? How many oz are you leaving and in what increments? It's important to know how many hours you will be away and whether or not you pump on your lunch break will obviously depend on whether or no you go home to feed.
    6 replies | 113 view(s)
  • @llli*nivilovely's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:48 AM
    yes I have double sided electric pump.I can use 15 minutes break time to pump. I am not sure if I have little bit of oversupply, I get little uncomfortable when I go 4 hours between feedings. But I wont say I have too much oversupply. because by end of the day baby empties both of the breasts and goes to bed. I always encourage him to nurse at night. so he will wake up to nurse at least twice. "Dry" meaning - empty than my baby is emptying the breasts. baby is going to be with my mom and explained about paced feeding. hope it would work out.
    6 replies | 113 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:33 AM
    What kind of pump? If you are using a double sided electric pump (and that is ideally what you should be using) then I suggest definitely pump both sides at once. Pumping dry? That depends entirely on the situation. Some moms could pump for well over an hour and still be getting milk, and most pumping recommendation say do not pump more than 30 minutes each breast. How long a working mom will want to pump is probably going to depend more on how long a break she has than anything else. If the mom is a low or borderline producer, pumping "to empty" might be important, but if mom is a higher producer it probably is not and could even cause issues of OP. There are two concerns when a mom is needing to pump regularly over separations from her baby and they are at least equally important, but I think #2 is more important. 1) That she pump "enough" milk to be able to continue to provide her baby her expressed milk during separations, and 2) that her milk production is maintained normally and that she does not become full or uncomfortable during the separation. It is a myth that a mom who is pumping for a work separation should try to pump when or how her baby would nurse. This is not typically possible, convenient, or needed. What is needed is for milk removal to happen in a way that the above two concerns are addressed, and there are many variable ways that could happen. And it is not only about pumping- how often and well baby nurses when you are together is a vitally...
    6 replies | 113 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:09 AM
    Hi and welcome. There are a few threads on here about babies not nursing when awake. Most of the time, the issues begin after a few months, not right after birth. But you may find information that helps you if you can find those threads. You may find those threads by searching terms like baby only nurses when asleep or baby will not nurse when awake etc. on the internet. I am not sure if there is a search function within the forum and cannot look now, but if I get a chance I will look later. So sensory issues particularly (obviously) oral aversions are one suspected cause of a baby not nursing when awake. This could include some innate sensory issue I assume, but if baby had any facial or oral trauma with feeding early on, this cause would be more clear. Also since for a baby, nursing involves so much more of the body, sometimes trauma or discomfort or tightness etc. in other parts of the body (neck, head, back, extremities) might cause baby to feel uncomfortable when nursing, causing an aversion. But as far as I know, no one really knows why this particular concern (nursing refusal while awake) happens. There are most likely many possible causes and several could be occurring at once. A fairly common cause or acerbation of this issue in bottle fed babies or partially bottle fed babies is parents being pressured to feed baby more than baby actually needs, either because baby temporarily really did need more to eat but the extra feedings continued past that point, or...
    3 replies | 104 view(s)
  • @llli*nivilovely's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:43 AM
    Hello Everyone My baby is 12 weeks old. I am returning to work tomorrow :gg . I can come home for lunch and nurse him. I would need to pump once in the morning and in the mid afternoon and one more time during my lunch if I could not go home. There is no specific exact timing that my baby would nurse. everyday is different. My question is do I pump dry whenever I pump. because my baby doesn't empty my breast that much, I always would be able to get milk after he has nursed. One more question, Would it be enough if i pump both breasts every 3 hours. my baby usually nurses one breast and if he is awake after that say for one hour or so. he will take other breast and sleep for 2-3 hours. or if he takes one breast he will sleep for 2 hours. So Should I pump both breasts every 3 hours? If I pump dry every time wouldn't he be unhappy in the evening? night feedings he will always take only one breast. and nurse every 2-3.5 hours Please help. Thanks in advance.
    6 replies | 113 view(s)
  • @llli*draaagonfly's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:15 AM
    Has anyone experienced this? I've been feeling completely alone. My baby is 7 months old now. For most of their life they have refused to nurse while awake. They will only take a bottle. They even had some weight loss in the first couple of months due to my misinterpreting their refusal of the breast as not being hungry, when in fact they just wanted a bottle. However, unless they are full, once asleep I can usually latch them no problem and they will nurse until full. My partner and I are both on the spectrum... Could this be a sensory issue? I believe our troubles started on day one. I had a successful home water birth but was ambulance transferred to hospital a couple of hours later due to hemorrhage. Later that night they began to suspect babe had an infection. We ended up in the NICU where they were on IV antibiotics for 5 days. The first night a nurse came to me from the NICU to my bed in the birthing unit, where I had an IV and catheter and couldn't get up, and asked to give formula. I had just given birth and had been awake for probably 48 hours. I was alone as my partner had gone home to get some sleep. I said yes. There's no way I would have said yes under better circumstances. I'm really just looking for anyone who might have a similar experience, but any thoughts or suggestions are welcome. I've always imagined myself nursing into the toddler years but it is so hard to maintain my supply when babe is nursing less and less at night and I just feel like...
    3 replies | 104 view(s)
  • @llli*alhc's Avatar
    October 14th, 2017, 10:55 AM
    Baby had undiagnosed tongue-tie that we only revised at 3 months. So she was getting less and less and I was making less and less before we caught it. I never was able to bring my supply up fully, after trying everything. I've gotten it up a few times to EBF, but it always dips back down. I know I could pump more, but it's always hard for me to work up the energy to go in for a several days long pumping fest. I guess I've settled into this rhythm of combination feeding & I think she's kind of used to her little 2 oz bottles she gets a few times a day. But I guess that's a whole other thread! My only concerns for that day are that I would be pumping instead of nursing which I've never done. When I pump now, it's either between feeds during the day (sometimes) or at night after she goes to sleep (every night). I've never been away from her for more than about 2 hours. She does not sleep more than 3 hours at a time even at night. (I mis-typed her intake before as she takes 2-3 oz from me, not 3-4.) I think my flanges are correct, though I haven't had them checked by an LC. I take a hot shower before pumping and always do tons of compressions throughout or else I wouldn't get anything. And I hand express after to get the last bits. I'll ask the coordinators of the event if the schedule is such that I could pump 3 times. I'm sure it'd be fine, as it's a retreat specifically for mothers and pretty casual. And yes, definitely don't want a plug, I just got past one last...
    2 replies | 225 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    October 12th, 2017, 08:22 PM
    So your pump output is not meeting what your child gets when nursing...is that why you say you do not respond well to the pump? I am not sure if you are pumping during separations or when with baby, but generally speaking, your pump output is within normal range, and your child's per nursing session intake is certainly also entirely normal, even high. If you want to talk about milk production, intake, and need for supplementing etc. at all, I would first ask, what was happening that you were diagnosed with inadequate milk production in the first place? Anyway, to your question re: the retreat, generally, no, one day (8 -12 hours) of "inadequate" milk removal at this age (many months post partum) would probably not impact overall milk production. This is why when babies start sleeping longer stretches of 5-8 hours, as they sometimes (but not always) do at this age, it does no harm to milk production as long as baby is nursing (or mom is pumping) with good frequency the rest of the day. It does not matter whether production is low to begin with or not, a one time stretch without milk removal is not likely to lower it further than it was before. BUT a long day of concentration and exercise with inadequate milk removal is pretty likely to cause mom to become overly full and tired, and that double whammy could lead to plugs and/or mastitis. And that, of course, could be a major a problem on many levels. Except for the fact you would be pumping (rather than nursing)...
    2 replies | 225 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    October 12th, 2017, 08:02 PM
    My advice is unchanged. I am sorry I do not know what the numbers mean, I still think it would be a good idea to see a specialist and you can talk to your doctor about that. I did hunt around a bit online, and what I found is that if your prolactin is clinically low it could possibly indicate various health issues and is also sometimes implicated in low fertility. But this is why you need someone who understands all this clearly, especially if you may be experiencing "secondary infertility" (infertility after having a child with no fertility issues.) And not all doctors- not even all OBs- are going to have that expertise. And whoever you see might need to look at more than numbers, in part because understanding your reproductive history might be very important in ascertaining what (if anything) is going on that could be impacting your cycle so strongly.
    3 replies | 184 view(s)
  • @llli*alhc's Avatar
    October 12th, 2017, 06:55 PM
    My daughter is 7 months old and I've struggled the whole time with low supply. I'd like to participate in an all day yoga retreat in November. This would be my first time away from her for more than just a few hours. It would be 9-5. I'm worried if this would negatively affect my supply. A little about us, I supplement 6-8 oz daily with a mix of formula and what little milk I pump once or twice a day. When I pump I get 1.5-2 oz total per session. I think she gets about 3-4 oz from me when she nurses based on a few weighted feeds. I'm sure I could pump once or twice during the day, I just know how terribly I respond to the pump. I know this doesn't seem like a big deal, but my supply is so tenuous, I don't want to hurt it further. I've taken dips for whatever reason in the past, it just takes a boatload of pumping to get back up to speed. I'm not worried about what she drinks while I'm away. I'm only wondering, would one day of inadequate milk removal drastically affect my tenuous supply?
    2 replies | 225 view(s)
  • @llli*florida2001's Avatar
    October 12th, 2017, 04:02 AM
    im not seeing any specialist, I will have appointment to my doc in two weeks, I ordered these tests on my own, just to see where I am because after I stopped breastfeeding my period havent come yet. It has been almost 4 months already. I have breastfed my littel one until her 19 months without problem. here is more tests results I just had my routine blood test done and this is the result. I am trying to figure it out. Im 38 years, trying to conceive with the second baby. My first one is 21 months and I stopped breastfeeding 4 months ago and still have no period. FSH 8.1 mIU/ml normal range follicular phase 2.5-10.2 mid cycle peak 3.1 - 17.7
    3 replies | 184 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    October 11th, 2017, 10:23 PM
    You do not have to answer this, but I am wondering, who did these tests and why? What advice did they give you? Are they treating you? Did they say the low prolactin was a problem? How experienced are they in treating infertility? If you are not already seeing a fertility doctor, and you want to have a child anytime soon (born within two years) I would suggest start researching/asking around about infertility clinics right now and make an appointment at one that sounds good to you. At this point you have no idea what is wrong and might want to consider getting professional fertility advice/treatment recommendations. In my experience it can take months to even get an appointment at a good clinic, and then it might take months to complete all the testing a specialist would need to make a diagnosis, and then it can take many more months before you decide on a treatment and get started with treatments, and then of course there is the possibility initial treatment will not work and you need to try something else. Of course it might take much shorter, but personally I was shocked how long it all took and my one regret about fertility treatment is that we did not get into a good clinic sooner.
    3 replies | 184 view(s)
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