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  • @llli*teacherandmom's Avatar
    Today, 09:00 PM
    I teach at an elementary school and I go back to work on Tuesday. I am trying to figure out how to fit in enough pumping sessions. I have been reading that some people pump in the car on their way to work. Has anyone tried this? Is it safe? Any suggestions? I am renting the Medela Symphony, which has 30 minutes of battery life (plenty of time) and I already purchased the Simple Wishes pumping bra, as I will be pumping during my planning time and will need to be able to work while I pump.
    0 replies | 0 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 08:25 PM
    Hi mjane82, I am sure you are very concerned about your baby. Here are some general fact that may help you feel a bit less stressed about the situation: Allergic reactions to food proteins in your milk is one possible cause of bloody stool in infants. There are others, and some babies have blood in their stool for some period of time for no apparent reason, nor any ill effect. When allergies are suspected, the usual protocol is that baby continues to nurse exclusively while mom tries some common sense food eliminations from her diet to try to figure out the cause. This is because your milk is best for baby, even if baby is having a reaction to food proteins in your diet. Some things to think about- Aside from the blood, is there anything else going on that points to allergy? Rash, poor gain, excessive fussiness?...these things may or may not be present when there is allergy. Does baby seem to have trouble with your let down (Gagging, or coughing or even just gulping lots when nursing? Really big liquidy spit up? Super watery, explosive stools? Do you have any other symptoms that might fit with overproduction? (Baby is gaining very fast, you get quickly very full or engorged between feedings, etc.) I ask because overproduction/super fast letdown is another cause of blood in stool. Again, it is best for baby to keep nursing, and if this fits your situation at all we can offer many ideas for dealing with it.
    1 replies | 17 view(s)
  • @llli*dormir41's Avatar
    Today, 07:11 PM
    I guess all you can do when she drifts off is try to wake her. . . Tickle her, undress her etc. Will she nurse in her sleep? Maybe it's a skill older babies learn, but mine nurses very well in her sleep now. I just have to pay attention that she's keeping the nipple in her mouth, as she'll often suck when it's out regardless (she won't take a pacifier but she'll suck without anything in her mouth . . . This is her way of soothing herself when she's asleep now, I guess). As for leaning back on the couch . . . I hate it and find it uncomfortable, but I've been able to successfully sit in the reclining rocking chair, feet up on a stool, baby in whatever position we find workable at that moment on a nursing pillow to elevate her, and lean back using my feet to lean & rock back that way. I wonder if you could do that successfully without hurting your side?
    6 replies | 171 view(s)
  • @llli*mjane82's Avatar
    Today, 07:10 PM
    A couple weeks ago, my daughter (now one month), started to show flecks of blood in her diaper. Over the next week the blood increased. Our doctor is fairly sure that she has a milk and soy protein intolerance (MSPI). I've since cut it out of my diet completely...it's been about a week and I'm still seeing blood in her diapers. Does anyone else out there have any experience with this? I feel a little bit helpless and its hard to see her in this state. We will be seeing a specialist soon, but any experiences or advice would be appreciated! Thanks!
    1 replies | 17 view(s)
  • @llli*mjane82's Avatar
    Today, 07:03 PM
    My daughter is one month today and I somewhat feel like I got mastitis 7 days postpartum because of all the visitors. Our house just felt so busy and it became very difficult for me to nurse when I felt it was necessary. This didn't happen with our son because he was born during summer holidays - so everyone was gone away! I put a stop to visitors last weekend - I know their hearts are in the right place but its important that I be able to nurse my daughter comfortably and be a more relaxed mom.
    10 replies | 415 view(s)
  • @llli*naturegal64's Avatar
    Today, 05:48 PM
    I met with an LC & she gave us a few tips that have helped, we'll meet with her again in the next week or so to check our progress. Our main issue is that he is a preemie & an inefficient eater so we will have to keep supplementing until he gets to be a little bigger. Our main concern at the moment is how gassy he is. We use gripe water, infant massage, holding him upright for 30minutes, tummy time & he is still in pain a lot of the time. Any insights or help for him? I'm fairly certain it isn't my diet since I don't drink milk or caffeine, I'm not a heavy wheat eater, I haven't eaten broccoli in a year probably & I only eat very small amounts of spinach occassionally.
    8 replies | 257 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 05:04 PM
    @llli*maddieb replied to a thread Oversupply? in Too Much Milk!
    How are things going now?
    8 replies | 257 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 04:57 PM
    Well, I am not sure. Has there ever been any problem with your baby's weight gain? Have you had problems with plugged ducts previously? Is baby still refusing to nurse on that one side even after the lactation consult consultants assistance? I am asking because I am gathering these are all fairly recent developments? And tongue tie of course would have been around from the time baby was born. It is certainly possible your baby has tongue tie. But if it's not causing a serious breast-feeding problem I don't really know why that would be the first thing to worry about in this case. Again baby nurses very infrequently, or was doing so I'm not sure how often baby is nursing now. Unusually so. Did your consultant have anything to say about that? Because that alone would cause the problems you have been experiencing even if latch was perfect. I certainly would not disagree that it's important to always try to have the best latch you can. But good latch means that baby gets milk and mom is comfortable. In other words if nursing is not painful or uncomfortable and baby is gaining well then I don't really know that the latch could be all that bad. Again baby not being able to extract milk efficiently, which would be a result of the poor latch, would lead to plugs. But going so long between any milk extraction, as you've been doing for sometime I gather, would also lead to plugs. And if there's that much milk in there there's no way baby could empty it because baby just...
    7 replies | 157 view(s)
  • @llli*dormir41's Avatar
    Today, 03:00 PM
    Yeah, I'm kind of the same opinion. If it means I can pump less, I think it might be worth it. There actually is a stand for a hospital grade pump in our mother's room, although I was told it doesn't work . . . Not sure that's true though. I plan on looking into seeing how much the medela symphony would cost to rent since I already have a medela pump in style and it looks like I could use the breast shields and tubing I already have. I feel like I'm putting so much time and effort into pumping that my work is suffering (not really true, as I'm working and pumping most of the time, but whatever) & it takes away from enjoying the baby.
    15 replies | 662 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 01:10 PM
    I don't think there is any rule to how often to offer solids. As often or as seldom as you like. To make this simpler and more organic, you can offer stuff right from your own plate. Also, I would not draw too many conclusions from just one attempt/one food- this would not, in my opinion, mean baby is not 'ready' for solids. My middle son had a sensitive gag. He did not 'take' to solids until he was much older- over a year. However, I offered. He just did not eat! But for the first several months I was offering only purees and mashed foods, which was at least part of the problem. Once he could pick up food and eat it himself, he was more interested- although still did not eat much at all until well past a year old. I did baby led solids with my third, and it took her awhile to figure out sticks of food as well, except for really soft things like ripe pear. There are many ways to 'do' baby led solids. An alternative to the baked stick would be baked whole sweet potato, taken out of the skin and mashed up a bit if you like, and baby can eat herself with her hands. Of course it can be peeled and steamed as well but baking is really easy and (imo) tastes better.
    2 replies | 59 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 11:55 AM
    :ita with the PP's excellent advice!
    2 replies | 42 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 11:54 AM
    I couldn't agree more with the post above, but I am especially :ita with the following:
    2 replies | 50 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 11:53 AM
    Was she upset when she threw up? If not, I'd probably just keep letting her try a variety of solids and wait for her to get the hang of the whole thing.
    2 replies | 59 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    Today, 11:41 AM
    Hi mama, the best way to increase supply is to nurse and/or pump more. Sounds like pumping more is not an option, but could you try to work in some more nursing sessions? Most babies who are exclusively breastfed are going to nurse at least 8 times in 24 hours, and often much more, whereas you are only getting 5-6 nursing and/or pumping sessions in - so that is a setup for supply going down, particularly when 3 of those sessions are with the pump that often does not maintain supply as well as nursing. Although, overall, the fact that you are able to get as much milk as you do even with relatively few sessions suggests you have a fairly large storage capacity (read more about that here): http://dhss.delaware.gov/dhss/dph/chs/files/resmohrbachermagicnumber2011.pdf I really disagree with the statement that comfort nursing is "good for supply but a bad habit in general." I would say: comfort nursing is GREAT for supply and also COMPLETELY NORMAL and not a bad habit at all, it is so important for maintaining the breastfeeding relationship. If you can nurse more at night that will really help your supply a lot - having baby in bed with you can make that less exhausting. Normally if you were having supply dips leading up to your period (which is also normal), and you were nursing baby around-the-clock, baby would nurse more to make up for the supply dips. So you want to recapitulate that as much as possible. Congrats on 9 months of nursing baby, it can definitely be...
    2 replies | 50 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    Today, 11:34 AM
    If you drop pump sessions, your supply will decrease, so if you start dropping sessions you may need to supplement with donor milk or formula. If you want to go that route, it's best to pump wean slowly to prevent plugged ducts, mastitis, and simply feeling engorged. So first drop the session that yields the least milk, and distribute the remaining sessions so that they are relatively evenly spread throughout the day, perhaps with a slightly longer session at night if baby has a longer session he sleeps at night. If that goes well, then drop the next session. If you pump a lot at every session, then you may want to start with decreasing how much you pump during the session you want to eventually drop, and then cut it out altogether. It really goes by feel and how you are feeling, but the idea is to go slow to prevent problems. In terms of the minimum number of times you need to pump to maintain some supply, that will vary from mom to mom. This article explains in more detail: http://dhss.delaware.gov/dhss/dph/chs/files/resmohrbachermagicnumber2011.pdf
    2 replies | 42 view(s)
  • @llli*drakes.mum's Avatar
    Today, 11:10 AM
    I have been exclusively pumping for about 2 months now. My son will be 6 months in about a month, I currently pump 9 times a day to maintain my supply and meet demands. I want to start dropping some of these sessions once he's 6 months,but I still want to be able supply him with some breastmilk. Is that possible and if so how can I do it?
    2 replies | 42 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 10:52 AM
    Hi I just wanted to make sure that there was some reason baby needs to get your milk from something besides you? For example are you back at work or returning soon, or something? I am asking because sometimes parents are told that baby "weaning" to a bottle or cup or "accepting" this alternative by a certain age is important. In fact this is not needed at all unless there are times you will be separated from baby Long enough that expressed breastmilk is needed for those times. There is usually no particular reason to leave expressed breastmilk if you're only going to be gone a few hours, and if baby is eating solids at this point even slightly longer times away maybe fine it depends on how long and how often you are away from baby.
    5 replies | 109 view(s)
  • @llli*toastedpea's Avatar
    Today, 10:15 AM
    Dear ladies, I have a 9-month old baby who became a fussy and distracted feeder at around 5 months, so I think my supply dropped at that point and I got back my period at 6 months pp. I returned to work at 7 months pp and have been pumping at work (3x) since then and I notice that my output varies quite a bit with the menstrual cycle. My supply is highest when I'm ovulating I think - I get anywhere between 5-7oz during the first pump, 4-5oz in the second and around 4oz during the third. But before, during, and for a few days after my period, I get about 3-4oz, sometimes 2.5oz! So I basically supplement the baby with 4-8oz of formula during those 2 weeks of the month, and I don't need to supplement during the rest of the month. It's true that my supply has dropped a bit overall as well because of my long commute+work which results in my being away from the baby for nearly 12 hours. I wish I could pump more often but I'm exhausted, so for now it's just 3 pumps at work + 2 nursing sessions after I get home, and sometimes in the middle of the night (comfort nursing - which is good for supply but bad habit in general at this stage I guess). Anyway, sorry for the long story, but I'd love to do something that would keep my supply up and constant throughout the month. I have a one year goal (probably a fairly humble one given some high standards around here :)), and I want to try and minimize formula as far as possible for the next 3 months. Please help!! :)
    2 replies | 50 view(s)
  • @llli*mama7008's Avatar
    Today, 08:39 AM
    A sippy cup may be too difficult right now (or too fast a flow to just give directly, as you've discovered!) - you could try some of the tips for cup feeding in the link above - partially fill a cup with no lid, hold baby like you would to give a bottle, tilt the cup JUST until the liquid reaches their mouth (but don't dump milk into mouth), and let them lap/drink it up. I would assume, though I haven't fully read the links nor tried this myself, that this would allow you to pace feed to imitate feeding at the breast, too. The couple of times my baby has actually had water from my glass (usually I don't let it go back that far, but I was curious what she would do), this is the method I've used, and it was successful for her at 5-6 months old.
    5 replies | 109 view(s)
  • @llli*2coatskids's Avatar
    Today, 08:28 AM
    Yes, our ped just told us to move along to the cup so now I've bought every sippy cup known to man! She can hold it, but has know idea how to "suck" to get stuff out. I took the plugs out so the milk would just flow and I think most of it comes out her mouth bc it is way too fast.
    5 replies | 109 view(s)
  • @llli*mama7008's Avatar
    Today, 08:21 AM
    Baby, 6.5 months old, had her first solids (a soft sweet potato "fry" - more like baked stick) and the first time it touched her tongue, she threw up. It didn't seem to bother her, and she kept trying to eat more (managed to eat a teeny bite, which is all I wanted her to get anyway), so I just figured her gag reflex was really sensitive to the new food - she's always had a very sensitive gag reflex. But then 30 mins later, she threw up again. I'm assuming her tummy is not ready for solids, so I'm planning to hold off for a while and try again, but I don't know how long I should wait between attempts? Should I just try each month? I know "food before one is just for fun," so I'm not worried about her getting nutrients - she's EBF and very healthy/gaining well - but she is VERY eager to do what we do at the table, now fussing and crying when she sees food go in my mouth she can't have. She's sometimes happy just playing with a spoon or cup, so I always offer those to her while we eat.
    2 replies | 59 view(s)
  • @llli*mama7008's Avatar
    Today, 08:14 AM
    I'm not sure how to make her take a bottle, but have you considered alternatives like a cup? http://kellymom.com/bf/pumpingmoms/feeding-tools/alternative-feeding/ Has a bunch of resources on alternative feeding tools, which you may find helpful. My baby was never able to properly suck on an artificial nipple (bottle or paci) before her ties were revised, and I haven't yet had to try, but I think I would want to do cup feeding as she seems to know what to do there from pretending to drink from my water glass!
    5 replies | 109 view(s)
  • @llli*2coatskids's Avatar
    Today, 08:07 AM
    Not sure why the rest got chopped off... I've tried leaving her with my husband for the day and she made it 9 hrs before caving and taking an oz from the bottle. Would just like some suggestions or similar stories. Hoping nothing is "wrong" bc it seems like she has no interest or clue what to do!
    5 replies | 109 view(s)
  • @llli*2coatskids's Avatar
    Today, 08:03 AM
    Hello! I have an almost 8 month old daughter who has no interest in taking a bottle of EBM. We have tried every bottle known to man and nothing helps, she just chews on every nipple. She did take EBM in a bottle until she was 6 weeks old (here and there just when I would run errands). After that, no more. She had tongue and lip tie corrected at 8 weeks. She nurses beautifully and seems to transfer solids and a puréed foods well in her mouth. She has a strong suck but has no interest in a bottle. I have tried a cup but most of it just dribbles out of her mouth. It's almost as if she knows where the good stuff comes from and won't take it any other way
    5 replies | 109 view(s)
  • @llli*lllkaren's Avatar
    Today, 05:16 AM
    Oh, how stressful! It sounds like you're on the right track with getting help. I hope you can get in to see the ENT soon and that they'll be able to help. How did your baby do while using the nipple shield? Was he able to stay latched longer?
    2 replies | 111 view(s)
  • @llli*isabelofmtl's Avatar
    Today, 02:47 AM
    Signs he's stopped actively drinking, like reduced swallowing?
    1 replies | 113 view(s)
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